For 31 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 19% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 81% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Cipolla's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 91 Days
Lowest review score: 33 Halloween Kills
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 31
  2. Negative: 2 out of 31
31 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Cipolla
    It wants to be something cute for the family. It also wants to show how belligerent and vulgar young teenagers can be. The problem is that the two never intersect, and it’s jarring, to say the least.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Matt Cipolla
    This one sure is a challenge. Lots of that has to do with how the movie’s successes only become apparent after the fact. Its structure is its story, and it folds in on itself as much as it stacks its pieces on top of one another
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Cipolla
    Scream is not a bad movie. It is, however, a case of mediocrity being the worst sin. For a franchise all about coping with a media landscape that begets disillusionment to produce something just like this, it especially hurts.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Cipolla
    Despite the reasons House of Gucci doesn’t work, none are damning enough to make a bad movie. It’s forgettable, sometimes playing like the sort of cable-TV fare that displaced these tales from the silver screen over the past decade. Yet Scott’s efforts, and especially those of Johnson and Bentivegna, just don’t keep up. And what’s the point of going big if you’re not going to go for it all?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 33 Matt Cipolla
    Every kill on display here is to someone superfluous, immediately forgettable, or both. The special effects are decent at points, but at what cost? To bridge the gap to next year’s final entry? There’s just no impact here.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 33 Matt Cipolla
    It’s obvious that Young wanted to make something unique. Hopefully she strikes a chord in the future, but The Blazing World is just patchwork.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    Karia hasn’t made a deep film or even a particularly unique one, but he’s made one that has enough to get by. It’s not just good—it’s good enough.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Matt Cipolla
    With Days, Tsai turns the audience into the lonely and makes them see the world from the inside out.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Matt Cipolla
    It’s a very well done documentary on a technical level, and those qualities make it quite energizing at times. It’s the pace that truncates some of the details, making Homeroom too brisk to realize all of its moving parts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Cipolla
    There’s often a lack of narrative purpose, and refreshingly so. It follows whatever catches its eye. It, much like Bourdain, is zealous in collecting the excess of surrounding information.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Cipolla
    Textually, problems emerge from the myriad supporting characters, virtually all of whom play like narrative props. The script seems uninterested in its conflict; the filmmaking lacks the style to glue its pieces together.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Matt Cipolla
    The final result is about as much of a time-passer one could make with this script and what must have been a small budget.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    While von Horn’s script has trouble fitting its themes and plot together, Magdalena Koleśnik’s performance commands the good and the bad.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Matt Cipolla
    We’re All Going to the World’s Fair isn’t an exposé on internet culture or social media. Nothing about it is shocking, nor is it meant to be. That’s why it feels so real when it reaches its natural conclusion.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Cipolla
    As a fully-fledged statement, El Planeta wavers about as much as it succeeds. As observational comedy with a bit of bite, it signals good things for Amalia Ulman as a filmmaker.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Cipolla
    Dear Comrades! is—to throw an overused word around—timely, but largely in how it observes the conflict between communism and socialism and how modern audiences confuse the two.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    If anything, Fireball works best as a personification of its own themes. The textbook feeds the truncated, the truncated the tactile. Its own interests and understandings don’t always seem to exist on the same plane, but perhaps that’s okay. They’re still shining. They’ll sort themselves out eventually.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    It’s dissonant, often hypnotic filmmaking. It’s also rote for stretches, with Petzold’s narrative approach surprisingly straightforward enough to make it just decent overall.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    Finding Yingying doesn’t plumb the differences between U.S. and Chinese relations as much as the story alludes to, but the sheer emotion of it all largely redeems it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    For a look at the life of John Belushi, it’s a fittingly brisk one. For a dive into his career, it’s one that, despite a general lack of originality, mines a few solid points.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Cipolla
    Msangi pulls off something most filmmakers don’t: She adapts her own short film to a feature without stretching it out.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Matt Cipolla
    It’s about the many forms of privilege and the intersecting failures they result in. Most of all, it’s about how this United States, this oh so great country of God, can’t understand the difference between liberty and entitlement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Cipolla
    The Wolf of Snow Hollow aims more to be about its small village, but in reality, it’s more about how frayed police officers, especially men, abuse their privileges. It’d be a great vehicle to skewer these topics if the pieces fit together, but they don’t.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 42 Matt Cipolla
    Sorkin doesn’t face these evils for more than a moment at a time. He doesn’t even try to convert the uninitiated, but his movie thinks it does. His script and direction gaze rather than observe, and by the time the score swells and the requisite title cards inform the viewer of its leads’ fates, The Trial of the Chicago 7 has brought virtually nothing to light.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Cipolla
    A collage of distant memories and the realities that threaten them, Residue is an auspicious calling card for its filmmaker.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    Coup 53 isn’t the most coherent in approach or pacing, but its ambition––and overall literacy––ties its knots.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Cipolla
    Talking heads often go on long enough to distract from the overall thesis, and the runtime, while not particularly long, buries its own arc between the then and the now.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Cipolla
    The Mole Agent may stumble through some of its choices at first, but it sticks the landing by finding a cogitative dissonance and refusing to solve it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Cipolla
    For such a wide swirl of contradictions, Epicentro largely pays off.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Matt Cipolla
    For a movie that follows a character’s perspective while remaining aware of his shortcomings, The Father marks a modest and involved debut from Zeller.

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