Matthew Gilbert

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For 1,137 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matthew Gilbert's Scores

Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Sons Of Hollywood: Season 1
Score distribution:
1137 tv reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The miniseries certainly has a sense of dystopia coursing through it, particularly when world events turn grim; but then the humanity of the characters and, in particular, their profound bonds buoy everything we see. I was surprised by how moved I was at times at the fates of the Lyonses.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s good, if you like gritty crime drama and crooked cops; and, based on the three episodes available for review, it’s going to get better. ... The scope of “City on a Hill” is more ambitious than most of the Boston stories we’ve seen, including Affleck’s “The Town” and “Gone Baby Gone,” and that gives it distinction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    After watching the first three episodes of season two, I’m still not sure I can say that the return of “Big Little Lies” is altogether necessary. But I can say that it promises to be thoroughly enjoyable and smart, with the same conspicuously good acting, the same sharp David E. Kelley writing, and the same spectacular Monterey views that contrast so well with the characters’ dark inner lives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Matthew Gilbert
    There are moments when the series is a bit too obvious in its efforts to be contemporary, in order to expand the saga of Barbary Lane beyond the 1970s sensibility where it began. A bit about a pair of twins, Ani and Raven (Ashley Park and Christopher Larkin), who are obsessed with becoming rich and famous through Instagram, is grating. But the attempts to reveal a wide range of sex and gender identities are generally refreshing, and they help make this return to Barbary Lane and the spectacular views from its roof a little more than nostalgic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The movie serves as a lovely farewell to Milch’s show. ... It’s not sentimental so much as poignant.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    The four-parter is such a powerfully human take on one of our justice system’s most heinous blunders. Director and co-writer Ava DuVernay doesn’t appeal solely to our conscience; she goes for the emotional jugular. ... All of [the actors] are remarkable; there’s not a glitch in the casting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a fine piece of work that stands solidly on its own as a collection of intertwined set pieces that build chronologically to an emotionally devastating climax.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Yes, watching this miniseries is a grim affair, and I mean that as a great compliment to creator, writer, and executive producer Craig Mazin and director Johan Renck. There’s nothing here dulled by the decades that have passed by, no compromises to make it all more watchable. It’s a nightmare well-told.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    “Gentleman Jack” is British period drama, and it’s also a lot of fun.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Compellingly dark and twisty.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    The new “Zone” appears to be uneven, with both some nice tweaks, notably a more acute awareness of bigotry and terrorism, and — at an unmerited hour per episode — some frustratingly muddy storytelling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Matthew Gilbert
    I didn’t laugh even once; instead, I cringed over and over at the bland repartee and the way each character has one primary quality, which he or she telegraphs to us at every chance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The show is a smart, irreverent spoof, shot as a mockumentary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Six is not enough, and the final half-hour of the season arrives too soon. She clearly has more to offer than her excellent “SNL” sketch work. Amy Schumer has covered some of the same territory, but in a broadly comic way. Bryant has a light touch that buoys the humor, and she brings admirable restraint and sweetness to the drama. She’s a treat.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Matthew Gilbert
    Better Things is the kind of intimate show that captures the characters' mundane expressions of love, frustration, and loneliness so accurately that you forget about the art and effort behind them--the sensitive scripting, the genuine acting, the respectful direction.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    Leaving Neverland is not a particularly imaginative documentary, in that it sticks to a straightforward narrative, and, in its empathetic approach, doesn’t bother trying to include views from “the other side.” But ... It’s a shattering, unforgettable piece of work that will change forever the way I hear Jackson’s music.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It has flaws and excesses, but the series, whose first season is available on Friday, nonetheless lands in the sweet spot between comedy and drama, and between a plot-and-action-driven narrative and character exploration. ... By the time Mary J. Blige and Cameron Britton (he was serial killer Edmund Kemper on “Mindhunter”) show up as time-traveling assassins named Cha-Cha and Hazel, respectively, I was fully onboard, at least for this one season.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Weirdly wonderful. ... All of the other kids in Maya and Anna’s middle school are played by real kids, which makes the pair’s acting feat even more impressive. They pass as 13-year-olds even amid a cohort of the real thing. ... There are countless moments of insight and comedy in the episodes, but they aren’t linked up dynamically. That said, the friendship between Maya and Anna offers a series of ups and downs that, while not particularly twisty, satisfy.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The elements in Russian Doll may sound somewhat familiar, particularly the “Groundhog Day” repetitions; but they are all recombined to form something that is both fresh and revelatory.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a witty and sufficiently demented comedy created and written by Chris Kelly and Sarah Schneider, former “Saturday Night Live” head writers. ... There are plenty of jokes about the fickleness of Chase’s fame in the social media age, but Cary and Brooke are the show. ... Together, they’re a milder version of Billy and Julie in “Difficult People.”
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s a brisk, superficial, but smart film that essentially reminds us--repeatedly--of the potential outcomes in all the information we willingly provide about ourselves online.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    [The second season] is a great improvement, with some of the warmth and cohesion that were missing [from season one]. Shaw and her team seem to be more aware of the themes in play, more deliberate in building the episodes toward emotional peaks instead of letting them float in place as raw, envelope-pushing non sequiturs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Matthew Gilbert
    [Mahershala Ali's] performance gives the season its unifying theme, and at times the case is most compelling for the ways it intersects with his life. Despite the shadowy distractions, True Detective is a solid procedural led by a faceted leading performance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s well-acted all around and paced briskly enough to take up seven hours without filler. There’s nothing particularly ingenious about it; but there’s no looking down on a good story smartly told.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    Dirty John is little more than a fancy Lifetime movie. ... There is some pleasure in watching the inevitable unfold, particularly since the cast is solid. Britton is, as usual, a sympathetic lead, even if her character is written to be shallow. And, as her daughters, Juno Temple and Julia Garner are formidable. ... As with Debra, John is written as a flat bad guy whose deeper drives are inscrutable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s as amiably engaging as it is enlightening while it looks into the ups and downs of a newly realized bisexual.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Matthew Gilbert
    The limited series, about the long, complex friendship between Elena and Lila, breathtakingly renders Ferrante’s world on the poor outskirts of Naples in all its simple beauty and cruelty. But its first two episodes, set in the 1950s, are elevated most by Elisa Del Genio and Ludovica Nasti, who play the preteen Elena and Lila, respectively. ... Insightful and clear-eyed, My Brilliant Friend takes you there.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    Stiller and the writers get a little carried away with the dull work these men had to perform before they escaped. But still, the acting carries us through, as if we’re under a dark spell.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Matthew Gilbert
    The Danny plot is fine--nothing special really, although Dornan is excellent and manages to bring a good sense of transformation to an underwritten character. ... But Dinklage, like Dornan, manages to convey a fully dimensional person despite the skipping of narrative steps.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 0 Matthew Gilbert
    An abominable, grating, crass, predictable, and lazy new Fox sitcom.

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