For 3,263 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mick LaSalle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Live Free or Die Hard
Lowest review score: 0 The Darkest Minds
Score distribution:
3263 movie reviews
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Aside from being annoying, depressing and repulsive, Chaos Walking has a lot going for it. It’s directed by Doug Liman (“Go”) and takes place in a fully imagined other world. Plus, it stars Tom Holland and Daisy Ridley, who are smart and watchable, and the movie does get better as it goes along.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Ultimately, no matter what angle you see Bliss from, the story converges on a choice and a question: Which world do you choose to live in? And what can bring a person back to reality?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    The drama builds and builds until the last seconds and never really lets up. It’s a striking debut from Meneghetti, in his first feature film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    As Baby Boomers continue to dominate the culture through sheer numbers, you can expect more movies about demented parents. But a good rule of thumb for those who’d attempt such a story in the future should be this: If you want us to care about crazy old Dad, show us that he was once something more than an abusive sperm donor. Show us that he was once a decent father.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Judas and the Black Messiah quietly announces its modern relevance by presenting as sophisticated a depiction of systemic racism as you could hope to see in a movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Sure, The Mauritanian is better than staring at metal bars and better than two hours of rigorous legal preparation. But it isn’t better by much.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The goal here was to be absurdist, relentless and light. Well, Barb & Star is light — so light it floats off and vaporizes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    I Care a Lot is notable for its colorful supporting and featured roles — Chris Messina as a mob lawyer, Peter Dinklage as a Russian mobster and Eiza Gonzalez as Marla’s girlfriend. But the main attraction is Pike, who doesn’t try to make us like her. She commits to the character’s nature and holds us with her honesty, her intensity and her unmistakable pleasure in getting to play someone appalling.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Stevens, Fisher, Mann and Dench are all fine. All have good moments. The problem is the script, the script, the script.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Going into The Violent Heart, you must understand that the ending is insanely ridiculous. This is not to say that it’s not entertaining — in a way, it’s even more entertaining for being insanely ridiculous. But by the end, you will in no way be able to regard The Violent Heart as anything resembling a serious movie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    I hated this film. I hated every minute of it, and at times it even made me angry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    So The United States vs. Billie Holiday is a misfire, and what a shame, because Andra Day had it in her to be great in this. The movie just didn’t let her bring it out.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Hopkins makes himself transparent. He lets us see both who this man was and what he is now. There’s dignity in the crumbling facade and child-like terror in the eyes — and a warning to those who’ll be lucky enough to live so long.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Cherry is like three different movies in one: the teen years, the war experience, and then life as a drug addict. It’s held together by the smart writing, by the overarching tone of tragic absurdity, and by Holland, who hits every bump on Cherry’s way down.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Nomadland is too singular a film to dismiss on technicalities. It’s very much its own thing, very much an original experience, and must be counted as some odd kind of good movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    All of it works. All of it holds together, guided by the sure hand of director Simon Stone, who subtly imparts his sense of the story. His idea is that everyone involved mattered, and so we come away with an impression of an entire moment of time.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    in addition to the quality of its dialogue, Levinson’s script is a testament to the value of talking and listening, past the point of discomfort, past the point it hurts.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Though he crafts a story worthy of a thriller, Hancock’s main concerns here are twofold: the type of personality drawn to this kind of police work, and the effect this work has on them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Our Friend is both a tribute to a friend and to those rare people that are too humble to realize their own wisdom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Any Agnieszka Holland movie is worth seeing, even if Spoor isn’t up to the director’s best (“In Darkness,” “Europa, Europa”).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    The acting is uniformly strong, which says something about King as a director.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Certainly, the actors seem to be having a good time, even if the people they’re playing are utterly miserable. Hathaway’s comic timing has become a marvel in recent years, but Ejiofor, too, exults in the chance to throw off his usual gravity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    What’s fascinating about Kirby here is that even when she appears to be doing nothing, she’s worth watching.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Thompson and Asomugha are nicely paired. Too much is made by critics of the notion of “screen chemistry,” but there is something complementary in the personalities of these two actors, as well as in the roles they’re playing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    The beauty of Soul is that, just as animation is finding more being demanded of it, Pixar is answering that demand. It is making the case for animation as an ideal vehicle for exploring the grand, the general, the universal.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    The last five minutes of Midnight Sky are touching and beautifully acted — if you’re willing to wait for it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    Apart from the excellence of this film, Fennell may have tapped into something tonally that truly expresses the moment we’re in. Point being, we’re in a time of horrible ridiculousness, and ridiculous horribleness. The revelation of Promising Young Woman is that its heightened reality feels more real — closer to actual reality — than comedy or drama.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    It’s a grand bogus mess passing itself off as a philosophical statement. It has its moments, but they’re few. Often, it’s a beautiful-looking film — but it’s beauty without substance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    This is a bad film by a good filmmaker. It has the veneer of substantiality, but it’s unsubstantial. It is the product of sincere conviction and artistic confidence, but both were misguided. Every filmmaker needs to take the occasional chance, as Christopher Nolan did with “Tenet.” Not all chances pay off.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    The main event here is Swank, who was a plaintive and sentimental figure in her earliest movies and has only fully come into her strength in youthful middle age. This strength makes Fatale an entertaining diversion and holds out the promise for something deeper and more satisfying in the future.

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