Moira Macdonald

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For 415 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 71% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Moira Macdonald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Parasite
Lowest review score: 25 Fifty Shades Darker
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 29 out of 415
415 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    Hope Gap is a deeply sad film, and maybe not what a lot of us are in the mood for these days, but it’s ultimately uplifting, in its quiet way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Moira Macdonald
    The fun is watching the shivery details — such as a shot of the back of Cecilia’s neck, in which we can almost feel the sudden scent of a presence — and appreciating the skill of Moss’ performance.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    There is a touching universality to these life stories, which at this point have a lulling near-sameness: grown children, long careers, lasting passions and friendships (Paul’s and Symon’s is particularly touching), a looming shadow of illness, the nearness of twilight.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    This film is both a loving homage to Austen and a celebration of fashion and decorative arts.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Moira Macdonald
    “Do all lovers,” wonders Héloïse in a passionate moment, “feel as though they’re inventing something?” Portrait of a Lady on Fire, a bittersweet celebration of passion and art, feels like that; you’ve never seen another movie quite like this. In its quiet gaze, love becomes art — and vice versa.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    You leave The Assistant thinking about why some of us are invisible and some of us don’t notice — and about how evil lives in the places from which we look away.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Moira Macdonald
    I enjoyed Downhill purely for Louis-Dreyfus’ performance; we don’t get to see the “Veep” star on the big screen very often, so why not revel in her talent when we get the chance? As an exhausted working mom unable to keep from micromanaging the vacation — and a wife suddenly questioning her choices — she’s funny and moving and utterly believable in every moment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Moira Macdonald
    Sometimes too many ideas collide into each other — a zippy back-and-forth structure in the screenplay gets abandoned, and the pacing in the final act feels off — but Birds of Prey is never boring and often great fun.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Moira Macdonald
    You watch wondering what good actors like Lively, Law, Jeffrey and Sterling K. Brown (as a former C.I.A. officer) saw in this muddy screenplay, and why Morano, best known for the Hulu series “The Handmaid’s Tale,” couldn’t find a way to make them spark.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Moira Macdonald
    If Like a Boss had a decent screenplay, and was competently directed, it might have been pretty good.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    While occasionally the film wanders a bit too far into sentimentality (a scene involving a baby feels like it crosses a plausibility line), watching 1917 is an emotional and moving experience. You think of these two young men as one minuscule piece of an enormous tragedy, filled with individual stories.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Moira Macdonald
    This Little Women purist was moved to tears by this movie, and didn’t want it to end. Beautifully intimate, gentle and wise, it made me — and all of us — part of the March family. And what better Christmas gift could we wish for than that?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Moira Macdonald
    Ultimately, the film’s unwillingness to go deeper makes it fall flat.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    You can imagine how other filmmakers might approach this — it’s a beautifully cinematic story — but no one else would film it quite as Malick has. This quiet, meditative and very deliberate film (nearly three hours long, though not a great deal happens) is at once historical drama, love story and ode to nature.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Moira Macdonald
    “Cats” the movie is deeply, deeply weird, and not in a good way.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Moira Macdonald
    Eastwood’s very good with actors, and the central trio of Richard Jewell make the film worth watching.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Moira Macdonald
    It’s a pretty picture and a sweet adventure, and sometimes that’s enough.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Moira Macdonald
    Johansson and Driver are remarkably, heartbreakingly good in every scene; showing their characters’ journeys to an unflinching camera, letting the gap between them get wider yet unable, for their son’s sake, to completely walk away. It’s a drama playing out on two larger-than-life faces; a family torn apart, and yet enduring.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    Schultz has a lovely way of telling a just-on-the-verge-of-melodramatic story on a very human level.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    Not every moment in the film works perfectly — Matsoukas, on occasion, slips the actors’ dialogue into internal monologue voice-over, which mostly just seems confusing — but Queen & Slim has a remarkable power. You watch it recognizing the world you know, and wishing you didn’t.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Moira Macdonald
    Ruffalo, as a character more polished and reserved than he usually plays, is compelling as ever; he’s able to convey the sense of time passing, with the case weighing down on him more heavily as years slip by.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    In this season of Big, Serious Movies, what a treat to find this wonderfully silly, perfectly paced hall of mirrors hanging out at the multiplexes. It’s as if Agatha Christie came back for a visit, after getting caught up on pop culture in the beyond.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Moira Macdonald
    While A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood is charmingly filmed (I loved the animated depictions of the toy Neighborhood, and the way Heller switches camera formats to give a more old-school portrayal of Rogers’ TV show), it didn’t quite have the emotional wallop I expected.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Moira Macdonald
    As a movie, The Good Liar is just so-so, but as a master class in performance and star quality, it’s a pleasure.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    Whether you care about motorsports or not, Ford v Ferrari is a kick: both a rollicking true story well told, and a moving depiction of male friendship.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    The Irishman is long, to be sure, but it’s never less than compelling — Scorsese, De Niro, Pacino and Pesci, all in their mid-to-late-70s, are each carrying a lifetime of work, with practiced ease.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Moira Macdonald
    The gorgeous, perfect final shot of Pain and Glory — I might have gasped out loud — will make you feel glad to be alive, and in a movie theater.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Moira Macdonald
    Its central characters never find much chemistry — Clarke’s Kate is a one-note character, which is one note more than Golding’s character gets — and I left Last Christmas with many, many questions, none of which I can share here without giving away too much. The elf costume, though? Just right.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Moira Macdonald
    Motherless Brooklyn is lovely to look at — the cast, in addition to their acting talents, all look great in ’50s styles — and I enjoyed the noir-y jazz of the dialogue. (“Everybody looks like everybody to me,” a bartender tells Lionel, who’s looking for someone in the shadows of a club.) But it’s easily half an hour longer than it needs to be, and it’s full of moments that don’t go anywhere.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Moira Macdonald
    Harriet is a handsome and surprisingly quiet film, taking the time to honor the main character’s deep religious faith.

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