For 73 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Schager's Scores

Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Wormwood: Season 1
Lowest review score: 30 Picnic at Hanging Rock: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 60 out of 73
  2. Negative: 2 out of 73
73 tv reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The Scheme lays out its saga via prolonged interviews with Dawkins, which inevitably slants the material in his favor. Since Dawkins often undersells his somewhat shadier practices, that bias is occasionally frustrating, leaving the documentary feeling less than wholly reliable—an issue compounded by unnecessary and chintzy dramatic recreations starring Dawkins himself. Nonetheless, neither shortcoming is enough to interfere with the film’s lucid recount of the ensuing ordeal.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Save for a few minor missteps concerning Wyatt’s foolishness and Ruth’s less-than-wholly-believable anger over her own dad’s assassination, Ozark once again handles its business with merciless efficiency.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Dark Side of the Ring once again balances its wealth of great talking-head interviews and archival footage with cornier elements such as fuzzy dramatic recreations and soundbite-y transitions to commercial. Furthermore, it occasionally detours away from more interesting avenues of exploration—such as Jericho’s unelaborated-upon comment that Benoit’s scandalous crime almost destroyed wrestling—in favor of sensationalistic angles, which makes it at once immensely watchable and frustratingly shallow.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    It’s neither scientifically accurate nor remotely believable, but it is an entertainingly gonzo saga of suspense and intrigue—regardless of what Freud might say about viewers’ desire for such trashy stuff.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Dirty Money’s tales are swift and incisive; restricted to an hour, they slice away unnecessary narrative and argumentative fat to get straight to the fetid heart of the matter. That also means melodramatic manipulation is in short supply.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    After humoring Stewart’s account, as well as synopsizing the Zodiac’s reign of terror, The Most Dangerous Animal of All surprisingly swerves in its final installment, pointing its inquisitive gaze squarely at Stewart himself. ... The sight of the once-confident and composed Stewart trying to defend his mistakes, and charade, is enlivening. Moreover, it turns the entire affair into a critique of both itself and, by extension, the true-crime genre, where sensational claims and pretzel-logic explanations are routinely, and easily, presented as trustworthy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    If Knappenberger’s series sometimes lingers too long on certain narrative elements, the motivation for such minor missteps is pure: to convey the full extent of Gabriel’s agony and Pearl and Isauro’s villainy. ... It succeeds at inciting outrage at the wide-scale callousness that caused this nightmare to occur. ... It’s a sprawling, heartbreaking portrait of true evil.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    There are upwards of 20 main characters in Narcos: Mexico, and it’s a credit to showrunner Eric Newman—and their team of capable screenwriters and directors—that they all turn out to be distinctive and compelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Guided by countless video and audio recordings that Schneider made during this period—capturing conversations he had on the phone, and in person, with just about everyone in his orbit—The Pharmacist details the man’s mission with amazing immediacy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Mythic Quest often plays like a mild lark uninterested in pushing itself into truly gonzo territory. Once its protagonists’ quirks and hang-ups have been firmly established, the series is able to play off of those attributes to wittier ends. Yet even so, none of its central figures are distinctive enough to stand out from any number of like-minded comedy efforts.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Once more griping about the trivial and the absurd, the star is in fine finicky form in the 10th season premiere, this time around complaining about overactive pregnant women, excessive use of talcum powder, and cups of java that are so cold they don’t pass the “nose test” (i.e. David sticking his schnoz in the cup to gauge the beverage’s temperature).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Through a wealth of trial footage, archival news broadcasts, new interviews and prison phone conversations, Killer Inside persuasively contends that Hernandez was the byproduct of a perfect storm of negative developments.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    All in all, Whiteley’s docuseries is a gripping inside peek at the world of top-flight athletics, where calamities are always one misstep away, physical agony and emotional devastation are ever-present, and the process of forming a cohesive team is complicated by the thorny hang-ups that everyone brings to the table.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    A professionally mounted and consistently engaging regurgitation of stock crime-fiction archetypes and entanglements, it’s a bilingual work (available now) less interested in reinvention than in solid, straightforward dramatic thrills. On that count, the series achieves its modest goals—and, thanks to a few unexpected flourishes, occasionally exceeds them.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    It’s one thing to stoke audiences’ imagination and anxiety with uncertainty, but do it for too long, and to no conclusive end, and what you’re left with is characters, situations and conundrums that are increasingly impossible to care about—especially when the show has nothing enlightening to say about them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Overflowing with cannily edited archival footage (dominated by Lucas police-confession videos, and TV news reports) and illuminating chats with principal players. ... The Confession Killer is awash in heartbreaking stories about the collateral damage wrought by this sham.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    [Kaley Cuoco] breathes Harley into three-dimensional life by revealing a more vulnerable, damaged and insecure side of the villain. ... With snappy animation and a fleet pace to match, Harley Quinn is enlivened by its anything-goes approach.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Refusing to deviate from its formula except in minor ways, it’s a cat-and-mouse game that never lets the latter escape the clutches of the former—a situation that, in the final tally, results in monotony, and winds up squandering a host of great individual performances from David Tennant, Haley Atwell, Jérémie Renier and the incomparable Nina Hoss.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Dramatizing the origin story of the famed Staten Island crew as a pastiche of every gangster and drug-dealing cliché imaginable, Hulu’s eight-part series is both ill-conceived and consistently dull. ... Only alive when its protagonists are crafting beats and verses, it requires twice as long as Showtime’s recent doc Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men to say half as much.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Schager
    The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance isn’t just a masterwork of practical puppeteering, production design, and CGI artistry. .... This return to the planet Thra exceeds any and all nostalgia-tinged expectations, delivering a multi-strand quest that’s exciting, funny, charming, and mythic—and sure to satisfy newbies and die-hards alike. ... It’s the rare prequel (or sequel, for that matter) that not only justifies its own existence but proves to be an immediate genre classic in its own right.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    [Cohen's] impressively restrained and charismatic performance helps this suspenseful saga transcend its more conventional moments, turning it into a character study about an individual torn between two worlds and identities, and a gripping account of the sacrifices sometimes required by patriotic service.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    The soul-crushing dread that comes from looking into an abyss and realizing that you may never comprehend its nature is vividly felt in the performances of Groff, Torv and especially McCallany, who is phenomenal as a morally upright man struggling to maintain his composure, and sanity, in the face of unspeakable inequity. It’s an endeavor that, in season two, only grows more difficult, as threats emerge around every corner—and outside every unlocked back door.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Where the series ultimately thrives, though, is in its characterizations, which transform in unexpected ways over the course of the first six episodes (which were all that was provided for press).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    No One Saw a Thing thus plays as a treatise on the ugly ramifications of brutality and disengagement. It stumbles a bit, though, in trying to make too strong a connection between McElroy and these ensuing incidents. ... An alternately transfixing and frustrating meditation on the short- and long-term costs of violence on a community’s psyche.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    There’s simply no dynamic undercurrent propping up Pennyworth. That’s a problem considering that its surface-level action is standard-issue, all frantic chases through London’s misty streets, bouts of fisticuffs against generic ruffians, and subplots involving Alfred’s army mates Dave Boy (Ryan Fletcher), who’s a wild-and-crazy drunk, and Bazza (Hainsley Lloyd Bennett), who has no discernible personality traits. ... Unsurprisingly, the most engaging elements of Pennyworth are its bad guys.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Alternately fascinating and frustrating. ... While Neville and Malmberg’s atypical non-fiction approach is initially refreshing, their disinterest in so much of the output that made Rubin a unique icon eventually becomes disheartening. Moreover, it results in repetition.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    At its best, which is often, this vision of tomorrow from Russell T. Davies—creator of the original Queer as Folk, and the showrunner who revitalized Doctor Who back in 2005—plays like a bracing “what if” scenario told from ground level. And if its balance of realism and out-there fantasy eventually falters, it remains an unsettling speculative saga of tomorrow, and the vigilance required to prevent the destruction of everything we hold dear.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Dark skillfully pulls on its narrative threads until they’re head-spinningly knotted. In the four episodes provided to the press, it expands on most of its myriad aspects, developing its central relationships, introducing new antagonists (including a shadowy puppetmaster), and disclosing more about its overarching mythology.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    From its window-dressing address of Nazis’ “final solution” attitudes toward Jews, to its dutiful recreation of Petersen’s submarine set pieces—in which alarms sound for each incoming attack, the crew goes quiet as it’s stalked by enemy destroyers, and rapidly escalating sonar beeps presage imminent danger—Das Boot is a handsome endeavor that’s never urgent or unique. Or, consequently, necessary.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Schager
    Deadwood: The Movie is the perfect ending to television’s all-time best show. ... Just as it’s to be expected, Milch balances such touchingly somber moments with instances of camaraderie, treachery, violence and absurdity.

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