Niv M. Sultan

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For 19 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 10% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Niv M. Sultan's Scores

Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 88 Catch-22 (2019): Season 1
Lowest review score: 50 Unbelievable: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 19
  2. Negative: 0 out of 19
19 tv reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Niv M. Sultan
    Mrs. America, the creation of writer-producer Dahvi Waller, deftly reckons with decades of squandered political potential, both in its depiction of the ‘70s and in the parallels it draws with the present.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    Real-world context renders these resolutions reassuring rather than trite: No difficulty in the series is impossible to overcome, so long as the Alvarezes stick together. The promise of unconditional unity that permeates One Day at a Time comes through not only in grand apologies and lessons, but also in subtler interactions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Niv M. Sultan
    Haggard and Freeman’s lightning-strike chemistry fuels their supersonic banter and warm, softer exchanges.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    The first half of the season leverages these characters less as nuanced people than as bundles of eccentricities. ... The second half of the season more deeply examines the ambitions and fears of its characters, as well as the video game industry’s power dynamics. ... Though the episode [“A Dark Quiet Death”] is self-contained, it infuses the rest of the season with subtle weight and sympathy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    Despite the sordid, festering material that the series explores, what ultimately emerges from The New Pope is sheer beauty. It’s an understated grace, one that director Paolo Sorrentino and cinematographer Luca Bigazzi effect with an eye to intimacy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Niv M. Sultan
    In contrast to its halfhearted approach to exposition, The Witcher finds its footing in the graphic depiction of violence. The show’s energetic battle scenes, set to a stirring score by composers Sonya Belousova and Giona Ostinelli, create the impression that the burly, snow-caked background actors of Game of Thrones were moving at three-quarters speed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    Propelled by its magnetic performances, the series is an uneasy, sometimes nauseating, and often fascinating examination of our still-unspooling current moment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Niv M. Sultan
    Throughout the series, Josh often breaks the fourth wall by introducing flashbacks, cuing montages, and contextualizing the apocalypse for the audience. These meta moments are less charming than lazy, rejecting subtle world-building in favor of information dumps. Much of the Daybreak’s comedy is similarly uninspired. ... Insipid comedy aside, Daybreak offers evocative reflections on the premature death of a generation’s childhood.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Niv M. Sultan
    Catherine’s lack of change, along with her consistent ability to outmaneuver her political opponents, robs the series of momentum despite the astonishing range of Mirren and Clarke’s performances. No threat to Catherine’s reign is ever serious, no geopolitical conflict ever out of her or Potemkin’s control. Conspiracies and wars serve merely to punctuate the show’s development of the romance at its core. That love story, however, doesn’t evolve much either.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Niv M. Sultan
    Modern Love’s strongest episodes feature well-defined, believable characters whose eccentricities generate, rather than preclude, a sense of familiarity. ... After episode three, however, Modern Love enters a disappointing lull.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    You can feel Bless the Harts figuring itself out in its first episode. There are bits that go on for too long; Wayne’s internal monologues, for one, move at too relaxed a pace and result in little comedic payoff. But the episode also features promising signs of the madcap humor that the series will hopefully settle into.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Niv M. Sultan
    Unbelievable commits to shedding light on the shortcomings of law enforcement, from the mishandling of sexual violence cases to the prevalence of so-called “bad apples” within police forces. The series, however, addresses these systemic issues heavy-handedly and delivers its didacticism in stilted dialogue.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Niv M. Sultan
    Not an episode goes by that doesn’t make one wonder what Carnival Row could have been had it not bitten off far more than it can chew. There’s much to like here—mostly the kaleidoscopic genre-mixing—but not enough to overcome the show’s confused handling of the socio-political allegory at its core. Would that this beast were more thoughtfully stitched together.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    Despite its proclivity for forced, flat subplots, The Righteous Gemstones is a compelling and humanizing study of its characters, the faith they profess, and the world they strive to proselytize.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    Though thoughtful and moving in its exploration of such suffering, both individual and collective, Years and Years occasionally stumbles by insufficiently using its characters to contextualize its political world-building. ... Perhaps the most significant aspect of Years and Years is the compassion with which it considers its characters.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Niv M. Sultan
    Though the three episodes made available to press are enjoyable enough, thanks largely to the cast’s continued strong performances, they’re weighed down by heavy-handed writing and an inchoate grasp of what powered the first season—namely, its subtlety, surprise, and emotional murkiness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Niv M. Sultan
    Catch-22 is tautly structured, rarely wasting a second as it rapidly cuts away from scenes mid-conversation or mid-word, zigzagging between satirical depictions of war’s inanity—best exemplified by the upper command’s idiocy—and sublime visions of its horror. The series invites our laughter, contemplation, and shock in equal measure.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Niv M. Sultan
    Dead to Me is at its strongest when presenting such tangled psychological landscapes in order to reorient our understanding of loss. It’s funny and sad, often both and rarely neither, a compelling and quietly radical depiction of grief’s emotional haze.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Niv M. Sultan
    The deeper explorations of Shadi and Maysa’s lives are welcome, but they’re too brief. The season might have had even greater impact had it focused more on developing its supporting characters, though one imagines Ramy will make room for that in its inevitable second season. But that’s a minor complaint, as the weight of Ramy’s journey is both significant and unforgettable.

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