For 38 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Pat Graham's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 90 Project X
Lowest review score: 0 Solarbabies
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 38
  2. Negative: 8 out of 38
38 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    On the whole there's not a lot of flesh on these cynically haphazard bones.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Pat Graham
    A few too many moralistic foreshadowings, but most of the time Cox's situations and characters develop on their own eloquently entropic terms.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    I suppose the constant repetition is necessary (Matlin's character only communicates through sign language), but it points up the film/play's willingness to sacrifice situational truth for didactic accessibility.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Pat Graham
    Director Joe Roth (Streets of Gold) seems content with recycling the negative charms of the '84 original and hoping that nobody will notice or care. Roth's no stranger to coarse enthusiasms (he produced the amiably crass Bachelor Party, as energetic as it was inept), but this one's on automatic pilot all the way.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Pat Graham
    Prince's narcissism was easier to take than than that of his contemporaries Sylvester Stallone or Rob Lowe: he didn't regard the rest of the world as an insult to his estimable self.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Graham
    This 1987 film doesn't quite leave its slasher antecedents behind, but the styling is never less than assured, and Ruben knows how to put bland, unruffled surfaces to sinister Hitchcockian uses.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 0 Pat Graham
    Away, away with all of you and your sorry master, director Alan Johnson, whose every prospect for future employment in this darkling realm of TV pilot failure must be waning by the hour.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    Timothy Dalton stars as the 1987 model James Bond in this 15th entry in the series, with the usual assortment of dope smugglers, KGB operatives, and criminal psychos providing a few anxious moments at the welcoming party. Expect the expected.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Pat Graham
    At times a bit too precious, especially inside the young navigator's spacecraft, but the warm regard for character, as well as for our often-inhospitable planetary home, makes for a reasonably good time.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Pat Graham
    Gene Kelly directed, a long way from Terpsichore apparently, though not, alas, from the Thanksgiving turkey.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Pat Graham
    The character interactions are strong, especially for this depleted genre, and Hill's tight, efficient styling recovers a lot of lost formal ground: his framing and crosscutting are as sharp as ever, and the bloodbath finale is, improbably, a model of intelligent restraint, the classicist's answer to Peckinpah baroque.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Pat Graham
    It's grave, lumbering, arrhythmic, and bloated, an emotional hogwallow of catchpenny insights and easy sentimentality...In short, a real bagful.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Graham
    Huyck's direction is resolutely uninvolved—every shot of every arrhythmically paced scene cries out for instant anonymity—and only Jeffrey Jones's sardonic scenery chewing as an archetypally deranged scientist keeps things marginally watchable. Lea Thompson is completely out of her element as Howard's sexpot girlfriend (though graduated, thankfully, from the treacly virginality of SpaceCamp), and as for the guy(s) in the duck suit . . . well, he/they deserve our condolences and prayers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Pat Graham
    Shelley Winters won an Oscar for being her own unbearable self (as Hartman's nagging mother) and Guy Green (The Magus) directed with eyes on the noble Kleenex box and visions of Stanley Kramer running through his noggin.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Pat Graham
    Plenty of strikes against this--moronic story line, obligatory animal mugging, more "awwwww" opportunities than any film since 3 Men and a Cradle--but it's still one of the most accomplished pulp fantasies in a while...When everything finally comes together, it works wonderfully well.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    Some scuzzily noirish moments, thanks to Robby Müller's slick black-and-white cinematography, but once the deadbeat trio get thrown into their cell, the film comes to a virtual halt: it's minimalism reinforcing minimalism, with none of the subtle counterpoint between movement and stasis, environmental opening out and psychological shrinking in, that gave Stranger its small energetic charge.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    Director Joe Camp, the inspirational hand behind the Benji series, shows some remarkable logistic skills in setting up his scenes, and the wilderness photography is never less than impressive, but there ought to be more to harmless entertainment than following wagging tails across the screen. Some formidable displays of technique here, but the treacly anthropomorphism makes it all seem trivial and wasted.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 30 Pat Graham
    Dismal SF deep think that gave birth to an equally dismal string of sequels and TV spin-offs.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Graham
    Angry fish travels to the Bahamas for the Christmas holidays, plotting revenge against the family of a vacationing New England widow (Lorraine Gary). Noel, noel, a charming gift idea with suggestions of inverted seasonal myth—until director Joseph Sargent swamps it all in antimythical literalism and predictable lunchtime theater.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    There's no formal stylization to speak of, but this is, after all, a film about performances, and Medak simply points his camera at the actors and lets them chew away. Some of the chewers are better than others, and Harvey Keitel and Frank Langella especially, coming from opposite poles of intensity and languor, deliver the honest emotional goods.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Pat Graham
    The film rarely strays from easy likability, with Hallstrom's spare, efficient styling creating a sense of chaste northern lyric (simultaneously warm and chilly: everyone wears coats in summer) familiar from early Bergman. More unassuming mongrel than pricey pedigree, but not a bad time in all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Pat Graham
    It's a pleasant enough diversion, in an amateurishly personal sort of way, though Townsend's frequent recycling of actors (for reasons of budget rather than laughs) makes for some odd Pirandellian confusions.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Pat Graham
    Pearce pads out his plot with lots of borrowed bits (notably from The 39 Steps, with Gere and Basinger as manacled fugitives), but the borrowings don't have any resonance of their own: they simply hang on the story like empty thematic husks.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Graham
    Nothing quite works as it should: the rhythms are subtly off, the pace is forced, the comedy overextended . . . and the surfeit of hommages—to the Keystone Kops and Laurel and Hardy and Jerry Lewis and all and sundry—threatens to sink it before it gets out of the starting gate. But there's something to be said for Edwards's insatiable overreaching, and at times the orchestration of pratfalls and comic pairings could hardly be more deft.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Pat Graham
    It's easy to pick this emotional bunny rabbit apart—for the sentimental bathos, the literalism, the radiating wholesomeness (everything David Lynch parodied in Blue Velvet, down to the impeccable small-town streets and flowers framed against a screaming blue sky . . . only Castle gives it to you straight, without irony)—though what's remarkable here, and altogether rare, is the artifice and polish of Castle's studio-rooted style.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Pat Graham
    You want misery? he gives you misery—dark, drear, suppurating medieval oppressiveness; monotony? he gives you that too, lots and lots of monotony; subhuman grotesquerie and primitive superstition? not to worry: this guy didn't direct Quest for Fire for nothing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Pat Graham
    It's not easy keeping track of all the contradictory tensions, and the film seems forever on the verge of spinning totally out of control, though whose control—Hunter's? Elmes's? anyone's?—it's hard to say. Still, it's more a success than a failure, if only because the confusions are so protean.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Pat Graham
    The snickering humor that percolated through the Coens' debut, Blood Simple, is the whole show here, and it's damn near hysterical.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Pat Graham
    The whole film seems ideologically forced and out of place, an attempt to resurrect the retentive virtues of Ford and Hawks without the cultural context that gave them expressive strength.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Pat Graham
    Bolt's moralizing ironies (as leaden here as in A Man for All Seasons and assorted David Lean scenarios) are enough to sink a thousand war canoes, and Joffe doesn't help things along with his patronizing vision of native innocence: the Indians only exist to be sentimentalized—as angels, victims, and amiable rehab projects for enterprising Christians.

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