For 90 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Pat Padua's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Personal Shopper
Lowest review score: 25 The 9th Life of Louis Drax
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 66 out of 90
  2. Negative: 9 out of 90
90 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Pat Padua
    Fans of the director may be a little mystified by what at first seems like something of a commercial sellout, by a director known for more challenging material. And indeed, The Whistlers has more than enough sex and violence to satisfy the average action movie fan. But dig a bit deeper, and you’ll find a mother lode of meaning just below the surface.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    A mostly smart and sexy crime drama, even if it loses steam by the time the ridiculous ending rolls around.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    If The Traitor proves anything, it’s that an 80-year-old filmmaker can still pounce.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Even if you’re not familiar with the source material, this Chinese production provides plenty of supernatural thrills for the modern young adult.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    At once charming and bittersweet. But the film loses focus a little as it heaps accolades on the late actor.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The Angry Birds Movie 2 is not great cinema. But the animated sequel — inspired by the popular Angry Birds games, available on mobile devices and other platforms — goes above and beyond what is to be expected from such things.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    The movie has its flaws. Still, for anyone with a soft spot for the mute gaze of man’s best friend, it’s hard not to shed a tear — or two — during The Art of Racing in the Rain.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Unfortunately, in the filmmaker’s narrative-feature debut, she takes the theme of betrayal and turns it into fodder for a sitcom, and not a particularly funny one at that.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    5B
    5B is ultimately about survival, and the struggle at its center is undeniably a heartbreaking one. Too often, however, the filmmakers get in the way of their own story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    “Echo” recalls a fertile era in the history of American pop music. But all too often, it wanders out of the very canyon that defines it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The film has more than enough true material to fuel an effective thriller, but director Aviva Kempner doesn’t quite manage to bring this fascinating figure to life.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    If its heart-pounding romance doesn’t make you cry, its sorely needed sense of optimism will surely make you smile.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    “Wild Nights” largely sidesteps the worst tropes of biographical drama, but when it falls, it falls hard.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Fortunately, the [animated] reenactments are rendered with sensitivity, respectfully capturing the wide-eyed curiosity of a young woman, and conveying her story in a way that archival footage and family photos cannot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Moviegoers may be happy to hum along with the jaunty soundtrack — and maybe even sympathize with the movie’s unlikely couple — but it’s unlikely to hold anyone entirely in its thrall.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Yet despite the stirring performance at its heart, the movie is ultimately too restricted by its own dramatic conventions, and it only seldom comes to life.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Shazam! operates as a thrilling fantasy and a comedy about the learning curve of growing up. It’s also a stirring tale of the heroic potential that lies inside each of us, if only we’re put to the test.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    “Ash” may not hit the dizzying heights of “Sin” but, compared with “Mountain,” it’s a far more consistent and satisfying ride.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Dragged Across Concrete may not be the kind of movie you’d expect to emerge from such inspiration, yet the impassioned energy of those composers is echoed in Zahler’s feverish yet stubbornly patient approach to storytelling.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The trouble with the film is that this animal love story also saps some of the franchise’s main strength, which has always been the almost pet-like relationship between humans and dragons.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Ultimately, Happy Death Day 2U doesn’t live up to its aspirations. Landon’s script may be better than his direction, but he leaves a potentially resonant subplot — one that involves existential questions — flat and lifeless, as if our most important choices were of no more consequence than a joystick maneuver.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Padua
    A thoroughly engrossing take on a familiar scenario.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Still, the movie has a kind of optimism that is reflected in the new generation of English thespians in its young cast: Imrie is the son of actress Celia Imrie, and Serkis is the son of actor and filmmaker Andy Serkis.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    While the young cast does its best to sell the gleeful music, its delirious premise eventually loses steam, as do the songs, which are stronger in the first part of the film. Yet despite this doomsday setting, Anna and the Apocalypse ultimately delivers an uplifting message.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    While the movie doesn’t shy away from confronting the obstacles of foster parenthood, it never fully earns its happy ending.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    With its charming character animation and inventive art direction, The Grinch is a vast improvement over Ron Howard’s live-action adaptation of the same story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    The film lacks the very imagination it touts, along with another trait that it links to exceptional athleticism. That’s obsession.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Here, however, Atkinson may even outdo Cruise, with the comedian hurling his 63-year-old body into the service of comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Sometimes feels like a horror movie with a contact high.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The movie gives some depth to its misfits, and ultimately sends the valuable message that nobody should be ashamed of who they are.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    In his effort to inject fresh blood into this gory franchise, which has already seen four sequels (including two “Alien” crossovers), the filmmaker can’t seem to summon up that old Black magic.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    It’s unfortunate that the tribute to veterans that is so much a part of the movie’s marketing turns out to be little more than a framing device that’s dispensed with for most of the plot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Its NBA all-star cast — well hidden under layers of makeup — has a winning chemistry making them easy to root for.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Grown-ups might not roll over for Show Dogs, but children almost surely will. With its fart jokes and smart-alecky canines, this talking-animal comedy is aimed at a young audience anyway. For dog-loving adults, well, it’s just engaging enough to make them prick up their ears.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    A lowbrow comedy so irreverent it could almost be considered a subversive indictment of law enforcement, not to mention lowbrow humor. Almost, that is, if it were remotely funny.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Given its pedigree, Sgt. Stubby takes fewer liberties than some fact-based war movies. Bolstered by an irresistible protagonist, the tear-jerking script by Lanni and Mike Stokey makes up for shortcomings in animation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Director Alison Chernick profiles the violin virtuoso, through his performance, of course, but she also reveals a personality as expressive as his musicianship.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The film’s central metaphor — life is like wine — is an overripe one.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    As Nur, Kanboura delivers a performance that is the most varied and effective of the movie’s three stars, growing from the shy newcomer to become the story’s moral center and heart.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Yelchin’s performance — grizzled, neurotic — is sadly on-the-nose, making us feel as if we’re watching the last act of a troubled young man.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Like its protagonist’s fleeting relationships, the film never completely connects.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Despite a glorious performance by Nicolas Cage as a vicious father, this vivid satire of a world turned upside down is marred by writer-director Brian Taylor’s sloppy filmmaking.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    In some ways, My Friend Dahmer is a typical coming-of-age movie about an awkward teen. What distinguishes this particular case of adolescent angst is that it’s the true story of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    The film’s young slashers are irredeemably smug and obnoxious, and their bloodthirsty craving for social media likes, represented by heart icons that float out of their cellphones after each murder that they document — without implicating themselves — fuels a vicious satire.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    An intermittently effective biography, marred by a frequently intrusive score.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    This is one movie that no one needs to relive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    Simultaneously earnest yet maudlin, Te Ata lacks the one thing its subject is said to have possessed: a gift for storytelling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    To its credit, Trophy neither shames its subjects nor offers an easy solution. Rather, it takes a reasoned and thought-provoking view — from many angles — of a problem for which there is, as Trophy argues, no quick or simple fix.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Thanks to the director Khan — who co-wrote the script and has an obvious fondness for her characters — The Tiger Hunter transcends comic stereotypes. But its predictable success-story arc isn’t entirely convincing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    Despite a few well-timed jump scares, Friend Request never really builds much tension.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    Writer-director Danny Strong’s feature debut embodies the very phoniness that the author — and his signature character, Holden Caulfield — railed against.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Although many of its subjects are endearing characters, the film’s scattered approach undermines its point about the simple endurance of an artifact.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Kidnap is a solid and economical piece of filmmaking. It just goes to show: A big budget isn’t necessary to make a big impression.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Tinged with madness and heartbreak, Endless Poetry is the unmistakable byproduct of, as the character of Alejandro puts it, “a heart capable of loving the entire world.”
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Quirky to a fault, the film’s most absurd moments are nevertheless grounded by the human need for connection.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Much of the film’s appeal is from the quiet determination of the patriarch Sung, unflappable under the stress, and the family and community who rally around him.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Although the film ultimately strikes a celebratory tone, the stark divisions it reveals offer an unsettling look at the state of public discourse.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Padua
    It’s a treat to watch an actress at the top of her game, flexing her interpretive muscles in a showcase that is inventive and thought-provoking.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    There are some inspiring people in the film, and one wishes it had been edited to focus more on their stories. In the end, Tomorrow is less a movie than a long public service announcement.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Dyrholm, who deservedly took the prize for best actress at last year’s Berlinale for her sensitive performance as Anna, movingly captures the struggles of a middle-aged career woman who revels in the new freedoms of the 1970s, while ultimately falling victim to them.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Although the central match in Chuck is effective, and hits all the right beats, unlike the best of the “Rocky” movies, the drama outside the ring is less potent than drama inside. This, despite strong performances by Schreiber and — especially — Moss, a grounding presence who summons a toughness not usually seen in her work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    In Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary, documentarian John Scheinfeld shows that the music of one of jazz’s most experimental saxophone players still speaks to audiences today.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Unforgettable borrows elements from film noir, Lifetime movies and slasher flicks and updates them for the Internet age. But this forgettable thriller will simply make you remember other, better films.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    Anyone much taller than a Smurf may turn blue long before its 81 minutes are over.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The documentary I Called Him Morgan, which charts his brief life and career, offers classic tunes and a vivid history of the New York jazz scene, while never quite managing to sell the drama inherent to its tale.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    The Boss Baby (adapted from the 2010 book by author and illustrator Marla Frazee) is a sweet adventure tale about sibling rivalry that ultimately becomes a moving tribute to family and brotherhood.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Pat Padua
    You don’t need to be familiar with Assayas’s previous work to enjoy Personal Shopper. It works in two realms: as an engrossing ghost story and a drama that addresses profound matters of life and death.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    I Am Michael, is an intermittently affecting — but not entirely convincing — conversion story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Overall, “Shoot First” is a breezy look at a professional whose work remains endearing, despite some highfalutin claims.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    This taut political thriller, set amid the soulless office architecture of K Street, has an ostensibly liberal bent, but its antiheroine’s Machiavellian methods turn the film’s subject away from its cause, portraying lobbyists and politicians in a dark light.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    As with giallo, The Love Witch features deliberately wooden acting, and can be a little boring at times. But it’s a stunningly photographed, fascinating reinterpretation of classic melodrama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    You don’t have to understand the lyrics — or even like the music — to find We Are X entertaining, even, at times, moving.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    What Now? is at its best when it focuses on his comic presence. Even if his jokes don’t all land, his train of thought is all you need for an entertaining performance that is funny, angry and sometimes just weird.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    “Lovers” suggests that any film — even this one — can have the manipulative power of propaganda.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    London Road comes across as no more than tabloid karaoke.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Max Rose seems to come from someplace personal, but its pain feels dialed down a notch to make it easier to digest. Still, the movie gains resonance from its look at what may be the final years of a movie legend.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    White Girl vividly charts what is at times a violent culture clash. But it is the young lovers’ desperate attempt to bridge the gap between their worlds that makes the film so deeply moving.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Padua
    Unfortunately, this film’s dark premise is drowned in whimsy and a forced childlike wonder.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Despite the violence, the real horror of Don’t Breathe may be the sense of futility that all its characters feel, whether they can see or not.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    Ghost Team should have spent more time with its big-hearted living characters instead of chasing after dead ones.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Gleason portrays great strength and great suffering in equal measure, lending vivid credence to tired platitudes about what it means to live life to the fullest.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    At times, the film seems pat in its portrayal of modern Judaism struggling to maintain tradition in a changing world. Tonal shifts are problematic, with a maudlin score that evokes television melodrama giving way to quirky, sped-up sequences that treat family drama as light hijinks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    Through the example of friendship and cooperation, The Innocents shines a glimmer of hope on a period of great doubt.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    The Witness makes an encouraging case for the argument that society is not as apathetic as we fear. But it also reveals a troubling phenomenon: our willingness to accept all that we are told as truth.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Padua
    The film’s most profound subject matter may simply be the passage of time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Padua
    The documentary Hockney presents such an immersive portrait of its subject — artist David Hockney — that by the end of the film it feels like we are looking at the world through his eyes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    Manhattan Night gets by on the strength of its visuals and a few vivid central performances, but by the time we find out whodunit, it doesn’t really matter.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    Pali Road toys with some interesting questions about the line between romantic love and fantasy. In the end, however, it’s no more than a mildly scenic ride.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 37 Pat Padua
    There are more than 6 million potential love stories in Rio de Janeiro. Unfortunately, none of the 10 that have been assembled in the anthology film Rio, I Love You is any good.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Padua
    The film’s likeable leads almost carry off a dark premise: that the love that strengthens this couple also makes them dangerous.

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