For 593 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Pauline Kael's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Right Stuff
Lowest review score: 10 Revolution
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 593
593 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Pauline Kael
    Ernst Lubitsch, who directed, starts off on the wrong foot and never gets his balance; the performers yowl their lines, and the burlesque of the Nazis, who cower before their superior officers, is more crudely gleeful than funny.
    • The New Yorker
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Pauline Kael
    One of the best 'New York' movies ever made.
    • The New Yorker
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Pauline Kael
    This stylized movie of ideas is a lean, impressive piece of work.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Pauline Kael
    Mostly it gets by on being good-natured enough for you to accept its being clumsy and padded and only borderline entertaining.
    • The New Yorker
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Pauline Kael
    This ghost movie has an overcomplicated plot, but it has a poetic feeling that makes up for much of the clutter.
    • The New Yorker
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Pauline Kael
    Once you get past the clumsily antic early scenes, the moody texture can take hold of your imagination. At its best, the film is a soft Irish kiss.
    • The New Yorker
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Pauline Kael
    A good-natured and engaging minor novel by Steinbeck, turned into a good-natured and engaging (though corny and quaint and picturesque) film at M-G-M.
    • The New Yorker
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Pauline Kael
    Extraordinarily simple, yet deeply, emotionally rich.
    • The New Yorker
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Pauline Kael
    The director Peter Yates and the writer Steve Tesich try to make a new, more meaningful version of a 40s melodrama, but their Manhattan-set thriller bogs down in a tangle of plot.
    • The New Yorker
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Pauline Kael
    The script goes from one formula to the next, and it reworks the pranks of generations of male service comedies, but the director, Howard Zieff, refurbishes the stale material with smart small touches, and Goldie Hawn has such infectious frothy charm that she manages to get laughs out of ancient routines about a tenderfoot going through the rigors of basic training.
    • The New Yorker
    • 95 Metascore
    • 60 Pauline Kael
    The film seems to go on for about 45 minutes after the story is finished. Audrey Hepburn is an affecting Eliza, though she is totally unconvincing as a guttersnipe, and is made to sing with that dreadfully impersonal Marni Nixon voice that has issued from so many other screen stars.
    • The New Yorker
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Pauline Kael
    This unapologetically grown-up movie about separating is perhaps the most revealing American movie of its era. Though the director, Alan Parker, doesn't do anything innovative in technique, it's a modern movie in terms of its consciousness.
    • The New Yorker

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