Peter Goldberg

Select another critic »
For 28 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 76% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Goldberg's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 88 Bitter Money
Lowest review score: 38 Maudie
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 28
  2. Negative: 2 out of 28
28 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    The film finds Dónal Foreman exploring the suggestive gaps that exist between his own biography and that of his father.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    At its best, the film is a testament to how Ruth Westheimer’s practiced decency was literally a saving grace during the Reagan era.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    With the film, Harmony Korine solidifies his position as the premier cartographer of the Sunshine State as a place of unhurried pursuits.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Goldberg
    Its drawn-out descriptions of culinary traditions and practices are enticing enough, but the same can’t be said about the characterizations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Single-minded and direct in its execution, the film is a hard look at the extremes of masculine guilt and healing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    While it pays lip service to the fascinating theatrical norms of pro wrestling, the film ends up expending most of its energy on its search for barriers that Paige can break through.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Goldberg
    This gender-swapped update of What Women Want doesn’t pass up the opportunity to undercut itself whenever it gets the chance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    Throughout Caniba, there’s a singularly disquieting relationship between the filmmakers’ formal experimentation and their subject.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Goldberg
    Even while it asks us to recognize ourselves in a world not too distant from our own, The Oath seems to say that the worst part of a full-fledged American dystopia would be the ruined holiday dinners.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    It's the film's concerted emphasis on Colette's ambivalent nature and desires that reveals her to be an artist just ahead of her time, fighting against, yet seduced by, her present.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Writer-director Augustine Frizzell's film is funny and surprisingly tender, if at times frustratingly uneven.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Goldberg
    Although the film never allows itself to be quite so freewheeling as Bozon’s earlier work, and pales as a result, one of its pleasures is how giddily it suggests its characters finding release from the bureaucratic rigmarole in minor though often inane ways.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Atsuko Hirayanagi's feature-length directorial debut offers a surprising take on the tricky art of communication.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    This is a film about the adolescent pangs to belong that also mines its tale of magic and malevolence for an imaginative allegory about the excesses of scientific inquiry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Goldberg
    Wang Bing's documentaries are angry, raw testaments to the human spirit in the face of social injustice. In this regard, his latest, the harrowing, soulful Bitter Money, is fortunately no exception.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    This is a gruesome art-world fairy tale unafraid to face the bitter details of its hero's tumultuous life.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    The film's meditative and excessive sides never quite cohere, giving the impression of watching two distinct films that are jostling against each other, rather than united in a single story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Throughout, the documentary wavers between a sincere investigation of the avant-garde music group Laibach and self-satire.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Julia Solomonoff's film ripples with a palpable sense of the sheer distance between the down and out actor at its center and his goals.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Peter Bratt's documentary sharply trumpets Dolores Huerta's life and centrality in the turbulent history of social justice since the '60s.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Goldberg
    Even its sensitive and gorgeous choreographies can't fully offer respite from the hollow narrative.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    The film has such a goofy sense of humor and affection for its premise that its uneven narrative is sometimes only as frustrating as a little static on an old VHS.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    The documentary is an insightful portrait of the former American president and the world that he shaped.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    The psychological wars that have made the prequels simmer with tightly wound tensions are given their most cutting treatment yet.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Goldberg
    The film is always at least gut-rumbling and keeps its humor in situations that are morose and awkward.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Goldberg
    Maud Lewis herself couldn’t paint a hurricane that would blow the film’s overburdened narrative off course.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Goldberg
    Its improbable story gives breath to the burden of fate on those living with a past unreconciled.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Peter Goldberg
    The film follows its refugee subjects closely but with a physical and narrative distance that respects their independence.

Top Trailers