For 432 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Dangerous Men
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 432
432 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The best part of Ron Howard’s long-winded and fitfully moving Pavarotti occurs at the beginning with footage from 1995 of the world-famous tenor — who died in 2007, at 71 — visiting an opera house built in the middle of the Amazon jungle. The legend has it that Enrico Caruso had performed there 100 years before.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    What emerges from this pretentious if diverting mishmash is a story that is equally predictable and contrived, but nonetheless offers some worthwhile insights into the notion of the male gaze and the subjugation of women.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    These successes are inspiring, but deeper and more complex emotions are unexplored. It’s no fault of Foy’s performance; she brings depth, humor, and conviction to her role as the devoted wife. Garfield, on the other hand, labors mightily but can’t overcome the superficiality of the character as scripted by William Nicholson (“Shadowlands”).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    After Love is like being stuck at a dinner with an unpleasant couple who won’t stop squabbling.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    A climactic contest takes place in arctic weather that would rival any New England Patriots playoff game. Had the filmmakers drawn more on this rowdy, hardy spirit, not to mention the hirsute gravitas of Peter Mullan, it might have done justice to its legendary subjects.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Or maybe Major, like Oedipus, is really searching for herself? Do people even have selves? Are identities and souls just a bunch of clichés spun out by teams of screenwriters? If these questions interest you, do yourself a favor and watch the 1995 original movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    If “It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946) had mean Mr. Potter standing on the bridge ready to jump, rather than James Stewart’s beaten down hero George Bailey, it still would not have been as namby-pamby as Mark Pellington’s treacly and bromidic The Last Word.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    There is no continuity in narrative or character and it’s all shot in an elliptical, heavily stylized, gaudily lit (much of it looks like it’s shot through an algae-filmed aquarium) collage.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    As the film darkens, it intensifies its focus on tragedy and atrocity and begins to do some justice to one of the largest and least known genocides in history.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    An opportunity to capture on film a unique cultural enclave is reduced to a Hollywood pastiche.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Ironically, the phoniness that iconic teen romantic Holden Caulfield despised pervades Jim Sadwith’s Coming through the Rye, a semi-autobiographical tale of hero worship and literary integrity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Contrived, inane, absurd, and occasionally brilliant, it’s all a blur.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Whatever the turning point, his transformation from feckless academic to stalwart knight occurs too easily. It should be the heart of the story, but instead is just a troublesome detail in a hollow movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The Meddler is a disappointment after the talent Scafaria demonstrated in her 2012 feature debut “Seeking a Friend for the End of the World.”
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Riggen has no shame when it comes to jerking the tears — surging music, cute children, suffering children — and sometimes her manipulations work even on the hardest of hearts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    It follows the lead of more recent Hollywood disaster movies like “2012” and “The Impossible.” It features just one family; everyone else is part of the scenery.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Exhausting and seemingly endless.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Zada gets credible performances from Dormer and Kinney, but their characters undergo such unlikely psychological contortions that these efforts are to no avail.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The fundamental problem with this Macbeth is that it insists on reducing the mystery of motivation to the pop psychology of a magazine article.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The pre-Thanksgiving release of Jonathan Levine’s The Night Before celebrates those Christmas blessings that are beloved by all: scatological humor, smarmy sentimentality, and gross product placement.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Only in the epilogue does the film mention that none of the miners was compensated and no one was held responsible.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Underneath its mea culpas lies a subtext that exonerates the post-Third Reich generations of its past.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Greer and Lyonne play off each other well; the combination of readily corruptible innocence and reluctantly innocent corruption elevate the material. Their badinage and interactions suggest a genuine sisterly relationship, with a long history of resentments, betrayals, and co-dependence. Too bad the filmmakers try too hard at making you laugh, and not hard enough at making you feel.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Barber, who directed the neglected, unabashedly satisfying vigilante thriller “Harry Brown” knows how to get the blood pumping and stoke an audience’s craving for righteousness, vengeance, and vicarious sadism. What he lacks is the woman’s touch, if by that one means nuance, ambiguity, and empathy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The movie, though, is not so good. If it came down to acting instead of chess, we might have lost the Cold War.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    No Escape is a tense but utterly predictable exercise in Western xenophobic paranoia and guilt.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    In the end, this feeble effort remains tainted, however unfairly, by the creator’s personal life. Maybe Allen should have titled it “Rationalizing Man.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Will miracles never cease? Alas, they do. Pausing pregnantly between clauses to add to their trite profundity, Quentin recites the moral of the story, and it’s as phony as the towns of the title.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    In Dito Montiel’s treacly, programmatic film, Williams succumbs to a recurring neediness, earnestness, and sentimentality.

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