For 432 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Overnighters
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 432
432 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Similar to Joshua Oppenheimer’s “The Look of Silence” (2014) in its confrontation with those implicated in past crimes, Wang’s film differs in that many of her subjects are both victims and perpetrators.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Argott and Joyce subordinate these more pressing political questions to a mirror-box exploration of the nature of truth and the unfathomable secrets of the soul. As such it is thoughtful, sometimes ingenious, but you can’t help thinking that they missed the real story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    [A] peripatetic and ultimately poignant documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Never has space travel looked so sordid, debased, mean-spirited, or crummy, qualities intensified by the (intentionally) ugliest cinematography ever — except for the close-ups of faces — from the great Agnès Godard, Denis’s longtime collaborator. But seldom has space travel served as such an eloquent and tragic representation of the human condition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Oblique, often beguiling, and portentously cryptic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    These men tend to be laconic, tormented, tattooed, impenetrable, usually bearded, potentially or actively violent, with screwed-up families and traumatic pasts. Nothing that a good horse couldn’t cure, or a talented female director.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    There are only two moments in Jia Zhang-Ke’s obliquely epic mobster (or “jianghu”) movie Ash Is Purest White when a gun goes off. Unlike the shots fired in Hollywood movies, these have consequences. As in many of the films Jia has made since his 1997 Bressonian debut, “Xiao Wu,” petty choices prove fateful and marginal lives are swept up by seismic social change.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Von Trotta comes closest to the object of her search when she looks at images from his movies. Especially images of the seashore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Dava Whisenant’s documentary, Bathtubs Over Broadway, offers a glimpse into a world few are aware of: industrial musicals — Broadway-style productions similar to Broadway shows except that they promote products like bathtub fixtures, surgical supplies, and John Deere tractors. They were performed exclusively for company members, sometimes recorded or filmed, then forgotten.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Schnabel tries to re-create van Gogh’s inner workings during the intense last two years of his life — his point of view and his way of looking at the world that resulted in the masterpieces that have since become invaluable investment commodities.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Everett draws effectively from Wilde’s own writings and witticisms.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Westmoreland’s narrative is cluttered with undeveloped subplots and loose ends. He compensates by evoking the era with images drawing from painters like Gustave Caillebotte and Toulouse-Lautrec and soundtrack music that ranges from Strauss-like waltzes to Erik Satie’s “Gymnopédies.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The Captain pretends to be a serious movie about the banality of evil; sometimes, despite itself, it is.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    There is a fair share of such Betty White-ish feistiness on display, but the pathos creeps in unexpectedly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Reed follows the proceedings as they happen and builds the suspense of a top-notch courtroom drama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As for Drucker and Ménochet, they vividly embody the roles of abuser and victim but have little else to work with.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Murky, clunky, but sometimes nihilistically exhilarating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though not as graphically powerful as other documentaries on similar subjects, such as Fredrick Wiseman’s “Meat” (1976) or Georges Franju’s “Les Sang des Bête” (1949), the emphasis on the disastrous global impact of these practices is more disturbing .
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this semi-autobiographical period piece, Simón achieves the rare feat of faithfully recreating the mysterious consciousness of a child. Though her techniques can get repetitive and stall the narrative, more often than not her elliptical editing recreates an innocent’s perception of the slow drift of time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his three-decade run, Rogers touched millions of souls. But the film is honest in questioning whether, in the end, he really made a difference.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though sometimes it seems like a promotional video, the film offers a glimpse into the vagaries of class, culture, celebrity, and social mores since the hotel was first established back in 1930.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Ronit’s ebullient spirit spreads vivacity, discontent, and resentment. She offers the possibility of choice — between secular independence or religious tradition. But Lelio opts for an insipid neutrality that does a disservice to both.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Chloé Zhao’s The Rider achieves what cinema is capable of at its best: It reproduces a world with such acuteness, fidelity, and empathy that it transcends the mundane and touches on the universal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Perhaps Fiennes’s intent is to draw the viewer into the solipsistic intensity of what it is to be Grace Jones. It is a bracing experience, because she is hedonistic, exultant, funny, and fierce.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Sarnet elevates his Rabelaisian folktale into a tragedy illustrated by haunting, metaphorical imagery.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    After watching David Douglas and Drew Fellman’s visually spectacular, technically amazing, and occasionally cutesy documentary, Pandas, you’d think that IMAX 3-D was invented solely for close-ups of adorable panda cubs, their giant doleful, domino faces peering out with cuddly curiosity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The clichéd dialogue, stereotypical characters (except for Toby Jones, who distinguishes himself as the wryly incompetent company cook), and the constrained setting (it takes place almost entirely in the officers’ dugout) deadens the suspense and diminishes the mood of dread endured by those awaiting their doom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    At a time when financial regulations have been gutted, stock market indexes reel, and trade wars threaten, Jed Rothstein’s slick and revealing documentary The China Hustle should only add to the anxiety and gloom.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    If anything, Chernick’s film shows a life that may be too perfect. In addition to his triumphant career, Perlman has a seemingly ideal marriage — to Toby, a woman who is his match in ebullience, wit, and passion for art and music. It has lasted for more than 50 years.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Beautifully photographed, well composed, but disappointingly superficial.

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