For 433 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 A War
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 433
433 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Starting with a premise that a smart-aleck high school sophomore might take pride in, the film rallies late to make some points about patriarchy and female empowerment, but not before a barrage of clichés, tweeness, and inanity.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Cinematic rarity — a genuinely philosophical film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It answers most questions by the end, except the most important one: Is the devil in Miss Sloane, or is Miss Sloane the devil?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The voice-over narrator (Perrin) recites environmentally pious platitudes that offer little enlightenment about what’s on the screen. This is annoying when something strange and unfamiliar is being shown.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Visually, it has the intense intimacy of a dream.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    An opportunity to capture on film a unique cultural enclave is reduced to a Hollywood pastiche.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The coming of age is not just that of character but of a whole nation, and despite the mild-seeming moniker, the Jasmine Revolution earned its victories the hard way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It is epic in scope, intimate in detail, and otherworldly in its dimensions, like the Bayeux Tapestry with special effects and a stentorian soundtrack.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Ironically, the phoniness that iconic teen romantic Holden Caulfield despised pervades Jim Sadwith’s Coming through the Rye, a semi-autobiographical tale of hero worship and literary integrity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The performances are meticulous and passionate, the narrative low-key and obliquely sensitive enough to conceal, until the traumatic incidents keep piling up, the film’s contrivance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Campos really doesn’t need to tack on such heavy-handed irony as the scene near the end of a disconsolate woman eating ice cream and singing along with the theme song of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.”
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Lassgård won’t let you off easy: A scene in which Ove weeps hopelessly before the magnitude of his loneliness will bring tears to the eyes of anyone who has suffered a loss. His Ove is a man indeed.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Contrived, inane, absurd, and occasionally brilliant, it’s all a blur.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The film works adequately as a historical drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Kenner and Schlosser not only remind us of a danger that never went away, but honor the men whose bravery was never recognized.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    What they don’t quite make clear, and perhaps it is impossible to do so, is what really happened in this odd episode of international espionage epitomizing movie-mogul tyranny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    John Landis’s “Animal House” (1978) this is not.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Because of the film’s earnest awkwardness, these excursions into the demimonde come off as campy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The sardonic laughs include title cards with the name of each character who has joined the ranks of the disappeared.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Their non-specific excursion unfolds like a blithe Woody Allen movie without all the name-dropping.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Vitkova brings a distinct gender sensibility to her story, especially with her recurring imagery of milk and blood.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The result is nonstop, epistemological slapstick.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    At its best the film evokes the palpable terror of a city where uniformed thugs could arrest or kill anyone at any time with impunity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Tweel has edited this material into a complex and emotionally exhausting vérité-like tapestry.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bi’s singular vision bears comparison to those of other geniuses such as Tarkovsky, Sokurov, David Lynch, Luis Buñuel and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Like those auteurs, he achieves what film is best at but seldom accomplishes — a stirring of a deeper consciousness, a glimpse into a reality transcending the everyday.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Unlike the Makioka sisters, this quartet lack ambiguity and mystery.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In short, the film inserts us into a solipsistic universe of Norman Lear, one that also overlaps many of the most significant social, political, and show-biz issues of the second half of the 20th century.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Alain might not have the very particular set of skills of Liam Neeson’s character in “Taken” (2008), but he does have the perseverance of John Wayne’s Ethan Edwards.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As he gets older, Todd Solondz outgrows the cheap shocks and easy nihilism and stumbles toward a mellow misanthropy. He compares his new film Wiener-Dog to “Au Hasard Balthazar” (1966) and “Benji” (1974), though it tends more toward the latter than toward Robert Bresson’s masterpiece.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Whatever the turning point, his transformation from feckless academic to stalwart knight occurs too easily. It should be the heart of the story, but instead is just a troublesome detail in a hollow movie.

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