For 432 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Rider
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 432
432 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Subtlety and irony are not among the film’s virtues.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    In Dito Montiel’s treacly, programmatic film, Williams succumbs to a recurring neediness, earnestness, and sentimentality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, director Bill Condon and screenwriter Jeffrey Hatcher are clueless, and come up with an incoherent, implausible, contrived mishmash.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the self-conscious derivativeness and allusions, Tsai’s debut already demonstrates the contrariness and motifs that have distinguished him as a unique, difficult, and transcendent filmmaker.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Occasionally the camera gets jumbled around, blacks out, and hisses with static as if it had been tossed in a dryer. Then it regains composure and reveals — an old playbill! A figure in a mask with a noose! The birth of a new franchise and the death of a great genre.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The film is engrossing and entertaining if sometimes trite and manipulative and totally bogus.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Unlike “Something in the Air,” or even “Saint Laurent,” Eden is utterly apolitical.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    As a directorial debut, Losing Ground astonishes with its assurance, subtlety, and style.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It is hard to rate Vikander’s acting abilities from this performance. Her sly automaton in “Ex Machina” had more emotional range.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    All this desperation and squalor reeks of authenticity. Many of the actors are from the streets themselves, and such locations as a crash pad rented out by a dotty lady could never be dreamed up by a Hollywood screenwriter.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    A bittersweet, wryly comic, keenly observed look at senescence.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Alonso sustains an atmosphere of otherworldly immanence in a vivid setting, with a style involving long takes with characters posed as if in tableaux vivants.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though the narrative of “Marnie” bogs down toward the end, this does not diminish its spell.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    There’s no end in sight, and that’s what’s really insidious.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    The film is stuck in the inconsequential rut of the series. The characters are static, and the comedy is situational rather than dramatic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    More disappointing than the film’s inertia and amorphousness is its sacrifice of the real-world themes of class, money, corruption, and power. Unable to decide what story he wanted to tell, Téchiné hedges his bets and loses everything.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Such miserable people; why should we care? Maybe because Ceylan does. By staging this petulant misery in a snow-filled world of melancholy, unearthly beauty, he underscores their tragedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bonello takes on the point of view of Saint Laurent himself, exposing a visionary world seen from within that is as strange and wonderful as that of a magnificently stitched garment turned inside out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Related with stolid majesty, with long shots of brooding landscapes and close-ups of opaque faces, the film provides poor preparation for the subversion of genre conventions to follow.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The duo provide a bit of wit and warmth amid the contrived subplots and the self-satisfied moralism.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A 2009 film only now getting theatrical distribution in the United States, it is perhaps Farhadi’s richest, most complex and ambitious.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    So despite Tcheng's effort to add a metaphysical layer to the film, it pretty much repeats the narrative seen in many other documentaries about the fashion world, from Wim Wenders's “Notebook on Cities and Clothes” (1989), to “Unzipped” (1995), to “Valentino: The Last Emperor” (2008).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Plympton will be cheated if Cheatin’ doesn’t at least get nominated for a best animated feature Oscar.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The film at times genuinely touches on the bittersweet magic of first love.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    As a suspenseful true crime story, 24 Days succeeds. As a warning against the ever present dangers of anti-Semitism, it is eloquent and disturbing. It’s in combining the two that Arcady mishandles the case.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    A sometimes clever but ultimately clichéd comedy.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The film is so bizarre, contrived, manipulative, and meretricious that anything is possible.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It’s an awkward balancing act. The result is more Benigni than Bertolucci, and though Diliberto achieves moments of poignancy and touches on insightful psychological truths, it doesn’t look like he’ll be winning any Oscars soon.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    When the two veteran actors team up in Vermont writer-director Jay Craven’s wry, uneven Northern Borders, adapted from Howard Frank Mosher’s novel, they mesh so well they almost hold the rest of the movie together. But their nuanced performances underscore the weakness of the rest of the cast, and Craven’s erratic tonal shifts from the whimsical to the sentimental trip up the episodic plot.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    It tries to bridge the gap between pop culture and cultural elitism, between high art and the common commodity that everyone else buys tickets to see. A worthy goal, but it results in a movie that has none of the virtues of either.

Top Trailers