For 2,525 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Me and Orson Welles
Lowest review score: 0 She Hate Me
Score distribution:
2525 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Without an actor of Broadbent’s poise and humor, The Sense of an Ending – which, I must add, is appropriately also the title of a famous work of literary criticism by Frank Kermode about theories of fiction – would be a bit too fusty.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    What makes Get Out more than just a slam-bang scarefest is that, in its own darkly satiric way, it is also a movie about racial paranoia that captures the zeitgeist in ways that many more “prestigious” movies don’t.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The action and special effects are mostly first-rate and Vogt-Roberts maintains a vaguely satiric tone that sidesteps schlockiness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    The film is a real rarity, made even more so by the fact that what has moved us so profoundly are a bunch of pop-eyed plasticine figures.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    It’s all terribly cliché-ridden and predictable, and the best I can say for it is that Shannon and Gugino do their best to convince us otherwise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Set in 2029, Logan is the closest thing to a valedictory the Marvel universe has yet concocted. Depending on how sentimental you are about these things – me, not much – it’s a bittersweet event.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Alternately discursive, philosophical, agitprop, and accusatory, the film itself is a species of essay.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    The Istanbul interviewees believe it is their responsibility to look after the cats but not confine them as indoor pets. This responsibility is a matter of almost spiritual deference.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There is barely a whiff of genuine transcendence in this grand-scale extravaganza. The special effects are courtesy of Industrial Light and Magic, but the magic here is largely industrial.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    At least “Hidden Figures” was savvy enough to please its crowds. A United Kingdom, with its saintly good folk and sneering bad folk emptily exhorting, is closer to a dry historical tutorial.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It’s an important subject, lucidly presented.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The film’s only real drawback, shared by its predecessor, is that it is simply too inventive. There must be more jokes and gags and throwaways per second than in 20 other comedies put together. It’s both exhilarating and exhausting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    As any kind of introduction to Ibsen, this film is more a turnoff than a turn-on.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If nothing else, I hope that The Comedian signals an attempt by De Niro to once again take acting seriously. Without much supporting evidence, he’s still routinely called our greatest living actor. There’s still time to make good on that.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Farhadi’s new film, The Salesman, isn’t his best, or even second best, but it offers up glints of what, at times, makes him one of the best directors around.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    His performance in Gold, as Kenny Wells, isn’t quite up to his Oscar-winning work in "Dallas Buyers Club," but it’s nevertheless a rousing feat without which this movie would have far less to recommend it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    The Red Turtle benefits from being open to all sorts of possibilities and interpretations because we sense that Dudok de Wit respects our imaginings. He allows them to take shape right alongside his own.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The Founder remains fascinating largely because Keaton is so good at guile and bile. Not once does he wink at the audience or overplay the obvious. His Kroc is magnetically repellent – more so, I venture to guess, than the filmmakers intended him to be.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    Shyamalan is a one-trick pony who needs to find a new rodeo.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Silence, though conceived on a grand scale, is an almost obsessively personal, at times even private, film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film, which swivels frantically between first responders, survivors, and investigators, has a percussive force, but its best scene, unbearably tense, is a quiet one, when a Chinese app designer (an excellent Jimmy O. Yang) is carjacked by the Tsarnaev brothers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It’s clear from the way writer-director Martin Zandvliet sets up the story that the fiery Rasmussen, who denies the boys adequate rations and pens them indoors at night, will eventually soften. It’s to the film’s credit that he does so in ways that are eminently believable.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It’s all fitfully sharp and amusing but hardly a masterpiece.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The story that Hidden Figures tells is so irresistible that you can almost forgive the fact that the movie itself is resistibly unoriginal. It’s an unabashed crowd-pleaser with a heavy history lesson undertow.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Driver’s low-key charisma in the role rescues it from terminal dullness, and there are a few fine sidelights.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Almodóvar is attempting to create a continuum of genres as well, one that particularly involves the traditional Hollywood “women’s picture” and film noir. That he doesn’t altogether succeed is perhaps due to the fact that Almodóvar is too enraptured by old movie conventions to give them a new life.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The strongest exchange in the film comes when he is confronted by several angry black activists who believe what he is doing is self-abasing and hurtful to the cause of civil rights. It is left for you to be the judge. I think he’s a hero. Every little bit helps.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    I, Daniel Blake is one of his better efforts because the story is powerfully focused and the acting is strong, which is not always the case with Loach's films.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Without Bening, whose performance is a watchful and laid-back marvel, 20th Century Women, written and directed by Mike Mills, would still be borderline worth seeing because of its supporting cast.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Pratt does a creditable job of playing distraught without seeming like a ninny, and Lawrence at least looks stylish, though she’s not called upon to do much acting. You can almost hear her saying to herself, "I wonder what David O. Russell has planned for his next movie and can I pretty please have a role in it?"

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