Randall Colburn

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For 79 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Randall Colburn's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 91 Weiner
Lowest review score: 16 War Dogs
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 48 out of 79
  2. Negative: 11 out of 79
79 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Ahari’s script is perhaps too focused on the secrets of its central couple, which are compelling but foreshadowed in a belabored way. By the end, the emotional catharsis is dulled somewhat by the sheer obviousness of it all, not to mention the convoluted route Ahari takes to get there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    It’s a jarring journey, filled with twists that snap and sting like bear traps, and an endurance test, too, especially for the squeamish.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    It’s a valid mission, one supposes, but rendering Bonnie, Clyde, and their cultural impact in such a one-dimensional fashion doesn’t add weight to its subjects. It only serves to strip dimension away from their own story.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    The Day Shall Come remains a riveting watch, though, if only for Morris’ deft, lightning-fast pace and the cast’s mastery of his language. ... The problem is that the film’s humanity is often eclipsed by its big-picture message and satirical edge.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    A singular work, brimming with ideas, by a budding visionary with a hell of a lot to say.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    While one wishes the beats were a touch more oiled, the film’s strengths reside outside the confines of narrative.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    It’s easy to get swept up in Booksmart‘s pace and pleasures, but take a breath and you might find yourself longing for a world that’s at least a touch more familiar.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    Us
    Us is something of a frustrating watch, a visual and technical marvel that just doesn’t seem to know what it is. Unlike Get Out, which only swelled in impact as you left the theater, Us is best viewed on a visceral level, not an intellectual one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Ánimas packs a lot into its 90 minutes, and occasionally suffers for it. There’s a dourness to the movie, a self-seriousness that won’t make it anyone’s favorite escapist flick. But while it wears its themes on its sleeve, they remain undoubtedly striking and thought-provoking, especially in an age where the issue of mental illness is being discussed on a global scale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Randall Colburn
    There’s a fundamental problem here, one of conception, not of execution.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    It’s vital in the sense that there aren’t enough third-party chronicles of this undeniably potent force in the online world, but it’s sloppy in how safe it feels — it’s easy to imagine the stars agreeing to speak so long as certain topics were either breezed over or avoided entirely.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Randall Colburn
    There’s a rich, hilarious novelty to the film’s juxtaposition of glittering pop and ultraviolence, but by virtue of the clear disconnect between story and song, that novelty quickly wears thin.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    It’s moving stuff, even if Kore-eda threatens to dilute his themes by overindulging in them. Shoplifters overstays its welcome somewhat as the third act rolls on, with an epilogue that seems to exist only to absolve characters that don’t quite deserve it. The empathy is admirable, but one wishes for a touch more restraint, especially in the wake of such an emotionally devastating climax.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    Cam
    It’s gripping stuff, especially since Goldhaber and Mazzei map out an endgame that’s maintains an intriguing ambiguity while still providing a definitive conclusion.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 33 Randall Colburn
    Hunter Killer has thrills, but they’re of the cheapest variety.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Randall Colburn
    22 July is a thoughtful, gutting achievement that you’ll likely never want to watch again. Greengrass’ approach here is graceful and deeply resonant, but it’s undoubtedly draining, especially considering you still have roughly two hours to go after the shootings that ignite the narrative
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Randall Colburn
    To watch it is to open a pizza box that’s been jostled a few too many times. Inside, the cheese clings to the cardboard, sauce splashes against the sides, and pepperonis drip with grease. It might be sloppy, but you’ll be damned if it don’t still taste good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    What makes A Prayer Before Dawn so powerful is also what makes it so punishing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Randall Colburn
    While the script is fundamentally flawed, the direction doesn’t help. Young, who previously helmed the brutal 2016 indie Hounds of Love, feels out of his element in the sci-fi action realm.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 58 Randall Colburn
    The franchise, however, feels less solid than Washington’s performance. There’s a formulaic quality to it, an aversion to the basics of world-building that gives The Equalizer 2 an outdated feel in a cinematic landscape where more attention is being paid to continuity and myth-making.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 42 Randall Colburn
    How It Ends ends with something of a whimper, leaving us feeling as if a compelling story was undercut by being told through its least interesting characters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    The First Purge is every bit as nakedly, hysterically symbolic as its predecessors. But if there’s one thing that the current political climate is teaching us, it’s that a subtle touch isn’t always the solution.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    As was the case with the majority of blaxploitation films, the original Super Fly’s appeal wasn’t in its story so much as the ways in which it carved out an unapologetically black vision that served to capture a particular era in terms of its themes, music, and fashion. X has done that here, but he’s also crafted a crowd-pleasing summer blockbuster that will appeal to the modern filmgoer.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Drew Pearce‘s Hotel Artemis...falls victim to much of what ails any ensemble picture — rushed plotting, forced coincidence, indulgence — but still manages to make a big impression.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Randall Colburn
    The only subtlety to be found is in the performance of singer and actress Charlotte Gainsbourg, though it’s her co-star, Jim Carrey, who will be the subject of most of this strange, ugly film’s discussion. And why not? It’s a bizarre, fascinating turn for Carrey.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    You know the characters, the beats, and the general arc. You know how it will end before the first act concludes, and that’s fine. The journey’s pleasant enough.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 33 Randall Colburn
    Unfortunately, the good stuff comes not only too late, but is more or less undone by a head-scratcher of an ending.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    Hawke is too committed for Toller’s humanity to not shine through. It’s a layered, transformative performance, his gritting, introverted Toller bearing no traces of the rambling, loose-limbed Hawke of Richard Linklater’s canon.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    It’s a mess, but a glorious one, the kind of ambitious, unapologetic project that’s most notable for its perspective.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Randall Colburn
    Hereditary‘s horror functions on multiple levels. What we see is undoubtedly terrifying, but it’s how we see it that truly distinguishes the film.

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