Rebecca Nicholson

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For 105 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 16% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rebecca Nicholson's Scores

Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Uprising
Lowest review score: 20 Emily in Paris: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 58 out of 105
  2. Negative: 1 out of 105
105 tv reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    It takes a lot of missteps and mistakes and clever moves to get there. It isn’t clear who he will end up with, until it is. But watching this delightful show weave all those elements together until it finds a path to satisfaction is a real treat.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    I still have a sneaking suspicion that Tehran thinks of itself as slightly more highbrow than it is, but it is a solid thriller, often breathlessly exciting, and has cracked the code of relentless tension.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    I suspect that viewers who have not seen the French original may get more out of this, as the agents’ storylines, about secret daughters and reluctant love affairs and buyouts and sell-offs, have a heightened sense of melodrama that is rarely seen on British television.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    Gaslit has taken its ample ingredients and turned them into a very good, very watchable drama that steadily finds its feet.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    It is a comic book fantasy about LGBTQ+ teenagers, and as such, it softens any hard edges and amplifies the sweetness of the romance at its centre. There is something altogether soothing about the time spent in its company.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Rebecca Nicholson
    It is so inventive, and creative, and original, that it seems petty to quibble. As the story progresses, it gets smarter and weirder, and the surreal twists once again land in an unsentimental yet beautiful place. It dares to ask big questions about trauma, grief and fate.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Rebecca Nicholson
    On the one hand, it is a twisty thriller that knows it is silly and hams that up. On the other, it attempts a serious exploration of consent and power, which sits uneasily with all the fireworks, and barely begins to unravel the knots it makes for itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    As is often the case with anthologies, then, it is a mixed bag, at times more of a curiosity than it is a fully realised vision. But when it works, it really works, and even when it doesn’t quite come together, it is different enough to demand your attention.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    It settles in by episode three, and begins to feel like an indulgent treat, even if it remains a little uneven. The performances are wonderful, almost old-fashioned, reaching for a classic cinema feel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    It is a touch superficial, then, but it is a lot of fun. The whole thing is given a VHS/old film veneer, and all that chest hair and bushy moustaches look the part. For a drama about greatness, though, it just doesn’t quite scale the heights.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    Its early moments may feel like broad brushstrokes, but Merchant has a knack for humanising his characters, no matter how crass they seem on the surface, and he hints at a deeper pain and embarrassment that gives this more heart and warmth than first appears.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Rebecca Nicholson
    This is television at its best and it weaves a spell unlike anything I have seen in a very long time. It demands concentration but rewards it generously.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    Sasha is a woman in pain, and this can be painful to watch. But this drama is invigorating, and refreshingly easy in its own skin.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    Joe vs Carole is a lot to take in, as might have been expected. You can hardly call the source material understated. But it is bracing, fun and surprisingly measured. If the Tiger King saga has not lost its shine for you, there are worse ways to dip into its staggering twists and turns once more.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    While the first two seasons were a lot of fun, Mrs Maisel found herself in a rut during the third, which paired huge set pieces with a meandering plot and episodes that felt far longer than they were.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    Entire relationships form and collapse at a staggering rate. The programme-makers throw spanner after spanner into the works. The spectacle is undeniable. It is hard to look away. ... But am I proud of myself for it? I’m not so sure.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    Each episode may be short and sweet, but the cumulative effect is magical.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    What’s curious, though, is that as a podcast, this format is fantastic, and if Van Ness released this show on YouTube, I would fully accept its giddy, scattergun energy. I watch Netflix on the same browser, and the same screen, but something about it here feels like a less easy fit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    This is enjoyable, steady, perfectly fine. But it is also classic prestige streaming service television, in that it is a little overdone, a little overlong and lacking the touch of ruthlessness that would have made it excellent.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    Yes, it can be a little sweet at times, but it is so generous and genuine that it is hard to judge it for that. As fans of Friday Night Lights may well already know: clear eyes, full heart, can’t lose.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Rebecca Nicholson
    Euphoria has returned as a more superficial version of itself – which is appropriate, I suppose, for some of its more screen-obsessed protagonists. But beneath its cold Bret Easton Ellis styling, there is emotional depth. If only it could find it again.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Rebecca Nicholson
    Its tone is perfectly judged. The show is so pitifully accurate about how cringeworthy teenage life can be that, at times, it is tough to watch. ... I found the very last episode surprisingly upsetting, and wondered if this was really how it would end. And then it pulled out its PEN15 superpower, turned its lights up, and became something touching and brilliant again.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    Tennant promised a “romp” from this updated version of Jules Verne’s novel, and it certainly is lively. This is big television in the vein of His Dark Materials. ... Clearly, there is great confidence in it. It is justified, largely.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Rebecca Nicholson
    It would have been simpler to have made another nostalgia-loving period piece, which doesn’t examine the idea in any meaningful way; instead, it balances its plates with care.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Rebecca Nicholson
    It all seems a little done, which is a strange flaw for a series about a violent amnesiac detective who is supposed to be dead. Of all the shows that might suffer from a sense that you have seen it before, Marcella, surely, should be one of the less likely candidates.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Rebecca Nicholson
    It knows how to tell a story concisely, packing its short instalments with crucial events, traversing emotional highs and lows, but never seeming bloated. ... Brief as it is, this second and perhaps final series should cement its reputation as a low-key gem.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    This is one of those dramas where the audience quickly has to make peace with the fact that every single character can and will make the worst possible decisions, or the plot would grind to a halt.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Rebecca Nicholson
    Novak is an accomplished writer and actor, best known for the US version of The Office, but The Premise seems to take novel ideas and flatten them out.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Rebecca Nicholson
    To say Los Espookys is easy to watch might sound like damning it with faint praise, but it takes serious skill to conjure up a world this strange, and make it look so easy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Rebecca Nicholson
    As always, it is defiantly tasteless (one thorny “dilemma” is resolved by a character’s suicide, and there is a romantic subplot involving a teenager and an older woman), but in turning up the mockery of “the obscene one per cent-er bubble” that Joe and Love now inhabit, it at least finds more space to explore its better themes.

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