Richard Lawson

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For 278 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Richard Lawson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Roma
Lowest review score: 10 The Happytime Murders
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 26 out of 278
278 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Richard Lawson
    Armageddon Time is a damning moral drama that is in thoughtful dialogue with complex matters of race and class.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Richard Lawson
    Had Tom Cruise not been in the cockpit, I suspect very little of that emotional component would be so effective. Maverick—loud and dumb and occasionally thrilling—is an act of arrogance, sure, a veteran movie star happily strutting onto the stage so lovingly set for him. (And which he helped design.) But that proves to be a clever reflection of the character he’s playing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Richard Lawson
    Men
    The film may have just been a failed stab at inter-gender empathy, were it not for its wretched final act. This is where Men takes an abrupt turn into surreal horror, and when something bad starts glinting just beneath the surface of Garland’s apparent motivations.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Richard Lawson
    The film somehow gets more interesting as it goes, swirling up into a climax that is mordant and corny and monster-movie fantastical.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Richard Lawson
    Perhaps a new day of Cage has dawned. One in which he can get back to the business of acting, unburdened by all the constant, semi-loving demand that he just bug out his eyes and dance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Richard Lawson
    Eggers’s action sequences are swift and brutal, filled with the crunch of life extinguished and tossed into the bone pile of time. Skarsgård, hulking and seething, is a fine vessel for the film’s opulent menace. He’s a fearsome, yet elegant, creature of destruction as he hacks and slashes away.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 95 Richard Lawson
    Rather than weak imitation, You Won’t Be Alone is a bold and compelling—and reverent—repurposing of Malick’s technique, turning its gaze on matters more squishy, profane, and fallibly human than Malick’s high-minded considerations of the divine.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Richard Lawson
    There is a chance that much more of Aline is played for comedy than I realize; perhaps the jolts of revulsion and fascination are meant to resolve into a giddy laugh. But the film doesn’t really wink to let us in on the joke, except perhaps for one scene that puts a full, slo-mo view on the results of this experiment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Richard Lawson
    Ambulance is a visual ordeal, but deliberately so. Bay wants us to feel the exhausted tension of his characters
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Lawson
    The curious fun of Daniel Espinosa’s film is in how it embraces the gothic mythology that inspired it. Morbius does eventually become a cluttered slugfest, as all things must. But for much of its run it is a stylish, intriguingly toned story of a man trying to thwart mortality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Richard Lawson
    The Lost City has the bad tang of squandered potential, misusing its massively appealing stars and failing the possibility of its premise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Richard Lawson
    The reality is that there is probably nothing truly novel to be done with Batman at this point. He’s been thoroughly mined for both fun and pathos; try as Reeves and his co-screenwriter Peter Craig might, they can’t squeeze much higher-meaning blood out of a fatally depleted stone. Pattinson, moody and saturnine, does what he can, but he’s not afforded much beyond growling and scowling.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Richard Lawson
    Christie’s cool flint is swapped out for tearful ruminations on lost love in Death on the Nile, an intermittently entertaining but otherwise tiresomely lugubrious trip down crocodile-filled waters.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Richard Lawson
    Moonfall is all cobbled together financing and bad green screen, simulated locations weakly standing in for the real thing and a host of capable but wasted actors. What an accidental irony, that Moonfall should, after all that, prove so weightless.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 35 Richard Lawson
    The film looks pallid and cheap, with pretty much zero nod to the style and panache of Wes Craven’s original. The jokes are heavily telegraphed as Clever Jokes, the references to cinema culture and film structure landing as obligation rather than organic bursts of analytical wit.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Richard Lawson
    What I will say is that director Jon Watts handles this grand convergence of properties old and current with enough verve to almost sustain the long run of the film. But there’s so much brand Frankensteining to be done that there’s really no time for quirk and texture; much of the bounce and sparkle of the past two Holland films is lost.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Richard Lawson
    Where Don’t Look Up finds its strength is in its lead performances, which can’t be undone even by the film’s exhausting, rapid-fire editing and McKay’s aggressive indicating toward his own punchlines.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Richard Lawson
    This new take on the material is more sinewy and sensual. It balances the property’s inherent melodrama with added grit, but not so much extra scuzz that it feels like an overly modern provocation.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Richard Lawson
    There’s some art to be found here, for sure. But there’s not nearly enough of the pop.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Richard Lawson
    Red Notice is limp and dull, and does more to showcase the shortcomings of each of its marquee idols than it does to highlight their bankable charisma. A globe-trotting heist film that heavily relies on zippy banter, Red Notice never finds its groove, instead jerking around between familiar action sequences and humor that never lands.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Richard Lawson
    It’s a lively, messy coming-of-age story which turns the clashing elements of its title into reflections of a certain youthful folly and daring, a penchant for base gross-out humor and big, revolutionary thinking.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Richard Lawson
    There is genuine familial chemistry between Hanks and Landry Jones, effervescing even through the layer of computer wizardry that led to Jeff’s final form.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Richard Lawson
    Samuel, who is also a musician under the stage name The Bullitts, makes an auspicious debut as a feature filmmaker. He knows when to deliver the expected punch and when to add his unique flourishes. The Harder They Fall trots along with invigorating confidence, a vision keenly realized.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 45 Richard Lawson
    Little clarity can actually be wrestled out of Cooper’s dank creation, a shallow, dour film that pays rote adherence to the mandate that horror must and should offer profound personal or social commentary.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Richard Lawson
    The gap between fact and fiction is where Bergman Island finds its murmuring potency. Its maybe unanswerable questions of self and creation give Hansen-Løve’s finespun film a sneaking weight. Perhaps one point of art is the guessing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Richard Lawson
    The Last Duel is a surprising jumble, a motley assemblage of tones that often work in perverse harmony.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Richard Lawson
    The film has a sneaky momentum.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Richard Lawson
    This is not a considered look at someone’s life; it’s a cash-in that just wants to get to the tragic end, hoping that the audience will convince themselves that they felt something along the way.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Richard Lawson
    It sounds strange to say of a film about such impossible sorrow, but Mass is thoroughly entertaining. Or maybe engrossing is a better word. Its incisive dialogue and nuanced performances demand our attention, inviting us into a roiling weather system of guilt and sadness. The experience proves oddly nourishing, clarifying.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Richard Lawson
    Let There Be Carnage tries to recreate the first film’s giddy shock while also upping the ante, taking what audiences liked and slopping more of that onto their plates.

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