Robbie Collin

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For 504 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robbie Collin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Wild Pear Tree
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 38 out of 504
504 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Too hectic to be scary, and with a plot that’s regularly bogged down in optimistic franchise-building spadework, The House with a Clock in Its Walls never quite grasps what made its inspirations tick.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    While the Black magic of old was a great fit for Iron Man 3 – the writer-director’s last venture into franchise territory – it turns The Predator into a shrill, murky, retrograde bore, whose handful of punchy ideas get lost in the cracks of its terminally haywire plot.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    This is an innovative, occasionally provocative, often frustrating film, but one whose perspectives on guilt and victimhood offer a new angle on a notorious case.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    It is less a true-life thriller than a kind of justice procedural – and a sharp, scouring work of moral seriousness from Greengrass.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    All-pervasive millennial unease – the sense the world no longer works as it used to, or should – is Vox Lux’s plangent root-position chord, and the film offers no easy cure – beyond Celeste’s genuinely great, and Gaga-like, music.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Even when the heist gets underway, the film takes its time about everything: what Zahler has essentially done is put a 15-minute mid-blockbuster set-piece on the rack and stretched it out until its cartilage pops. The duration is part of the point – you can’t do gnawing fatalism in a hurry – but the repetitions and languors here can feel presumptuous.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Audiard’s expressionistic flourishes are in shorter supply here than usual, although the shootouts have a dreamlike quality, with pistols blasting showers of sparks like miniature steam train funnels.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Dispassionate engagement won't fly here. You either stagger out early or plunge in up to your elbows.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    There is a danger of filing Peterloo away as an “important film” – but it is also a complex, rousing and rewarding one for anyone prepared to meet it on its own unapologetically ambitious terms.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Half-fish, half-fowl and altogether inspired, it is a dazzling mosey through the creeks and canyons of the Coenesque, whose scattershot format and by turns bizarre and macabre sense of humour belies a formal ingenuity and surgical control of tone that keeps the viewer perpetually off-guard.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    The story of A Star Is Born may be as old as show-business, but it is also electrifyingly fresh – a well-known melody given vivid, searching new force.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Its relentless, almost hallucinogenic craziness makes it a hard film to engage with, and the viewer drop-off rate when it launches on Netflix later this year will undoubtedly be steep. But as a mad satire of movie-world tumult, and a furious love letter to the business that made and unmade its maker, it could scarcely be improved.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    This is a skewer-sharp and scabrously funny film, stuffed with quotable deadpan exchanges, often punctuated by that now-trademark Lanthimos camera manoeuvre, the wide-angle whip pan that seems to ask “now what?”
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Every individual scene feels filled with the lucid detail of a formative recollection or a recurring dream.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Chazelle has always specialised in virtuoso endings, and his sure hand and sharp eye brings this ambitious character study smoothly into land.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    Despite the clumsy writing and production design, Thirlby and Hurt acquit themselves perfectly well, and Jürgen Prochnow makes an enjoyably ripe appearance as a former Nazi who unwittingly helps direct Ari towards his target.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Teen Titans Go! To The Movies may be unflaggingly daft, but outright silliness is rarely this smart.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    There are no depths to which The Meg won’t sink. But as trashy cinema goes, it all feels a little too well behaved.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    The first film’s very specific pleasures are comprehensively encored.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    As music documentaries go, it’s one of the quietest you’ll see – but it’ll be ringing in my soul for a long while yet.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    The First Purge is as visually hair-raising as its predecessors, with the usual range of inventively horrible masks worn by the Purgers (the costume designer is Amela Baksic), and a brilliantly achieved transition from a hard-edged, social-realist visual style in the film’s opening act to the overtly John Carpenter-esque gloss and throb of Purge Night itself.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Perhaps a Sicario series would make sense after this, though part of me wants to keep this story for cinema: if the market wants franchises, let’s have more like this, please.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    This is categorically not a film that will be universally admired – but even as it cleaves to old formulas, it transports your mind to new terrain that feels genuinely and frighteningly hostile, and leaves you with plenty of mental souvenirs by which to remember the trip.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Robbie Collin
    The film staples together two snazzy-sounding ideas – an ecologically inclined disaster movie with dinosaurs, and, later, dinosaurs on the loose inside a stately home – without considering whether the end product’s sheer snarling hideousness might just prove an intelligence-insulting turn-off.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Though the film resists easy categorisation, it often tumbles along like queer screwball, which chimes with its original French title: Plaire, Aimer et Courir Vite, or Give Pleasure, Love and Run Fast. It’s a fine manifesto, and Honoré’s film excels at all three.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Shoplifters is compassionate, socially conscious filmmaking with a piercing intelligence that is pure Kore-eda. This is a film that steals in and snatches your heart.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    A social-realist blockbuster – fired by furious compassion and teeming with sorrow, yet strewn with diamond-shards of beauty, wit and hope.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Robbie Collin
    Dogman unfolds its relatively straightforward story with both thrilling style and serious moral force: it’s a sensation judged on either bark or bite.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Robbie Collin
    Even when the film feels like a circuitous, effortful mess, it’s often an intentional one – and for everything in the film that doesn’t quite connect, that element of self-portraiture, with the artist as sap, strikes a wistful chord.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Robbie Collin
    Ceylan expertly draws your eye and ear to the drama behind the drama, and gives the most gently naturalistic scenes the weight and grain of visions. The word visionary has been flogged by the film business to the point of redundancy, but with The Wild Pear Tree, Ceylan reminds us he has earned every letter of it.

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