Rory O'Connor

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For 134 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rory O'Connor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection
Lowest review score: 0 The Last Face
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 5 out of 134
134 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Chen is never blatantly forthright in showing the prejudice at work in Ling’s day-today, allowing it instead to subtly seep into the film; we need only sift the tea leaves.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Rory O'Connor
    Contrary to the setup’s illusions, Brühl distances and thus absolves himself by making Daniel a nasty caricature–arrogant, speaking in brooding actorly tones, eager to pose for selfies and flirt with fans. Had he played it straight, Next Door might just have been vital.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    There are plenty of laughs but also, of course, moments to trouble the tear-ducts.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Nagy’s is a story of bleakness, a test of endurance, and a reminder that war is a hell that, atypically, refuses to rely on gratuitousness. And it ultimately, just about, earns that overbearing solemnity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Rory O'Connor
    It feels a complete whole––a wry intertwining dialectic on modern desires––yet each scene is uniquely bracing: beautifully poised, exquisitely observed, and even erotically charged––rife with unabashed seduction, though always close enough to farce to keep things kösher and to keep you guessing (it’s telling that we barely glimpse a kiss).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    It is an incendiary, playful, and wonderfully exasperated piece of filmmaking that shows a director trying to draw some threads of sense from our current malaise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    The director’s charms and gamely energy make foreknowledge something of a moot point here. The passion has clearly remained, most keenly pronounced in the moments when the octogenarian reveals his own influences.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 16 Rory O'Connor
    Indeed, the strangest thing about Mainstream (and it is a strange, strange film) is just how out of touch it feels. Granted, if it were easy to make a viral video we would all be doing it; yet what Coppola and her team have come up with is just so lame and off the mark and nauseatingly self-satisfied.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    Perhaps the most interesting thing in Hopper/Welles is that you can’t quite tell if the battle-scarred veteran is looking to wrap an arm around the younger man or is trying to defeat him.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    It is a thoughtful, unquestionably moving piece of work with much to say about the inner lives of the women at the center, but it could have used another gear
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    The protagonists of Wife of a Spy often act out of character, which all bodes efficiently well for the film’s slippery web of conceit, but ultimately quells a great deal of something the film is otherwise lacking in: feeling. It is, for my money, Kurosawa in low key; an interesting inclusion to a wonderfully idiosyncratic career.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    It is not a flawless achievement, but The Disciple has that feel of a burgeoning master: the patience and sureness of touch; the controlled surrealist flourishes; the sheer ambition and scope.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Rory O'Connor
    With all its sex and brutality, and the allegations surrounding its megalomaniacal creator, Khrzhanovsky’s project might not be for this world. However, it remains that rare thing: an artwork with the capacity to tap into our fears and even our hatred; to live in the imagination and to astonish. A shock of the new.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    It is a staggering film; one that defies categorization and a unique achievement that must be seen to be believed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Jia’s earnest approach has always been endearing and Swimming Out sees it in full flight.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    In taking a centuries-old piece of mythology as its source material, Undine ultimately forgoes the inventiveness and sensuality of its first half by slipping into relatively bland predictability. And for a filmmaker who thrives on disregarding narrative conventions, it feels a fatal error. “Relatively” is the key here. This is still Petzold after all, if not peak Petzold.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Woman Who Ran looks and feels like a pleasant farce in comparison to much of Hong’s recent output.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    The vast majority of the film functions as a hypnotic if frankly monotonous dialectic (ruminations on Christ, honor, “we were just following orders,” war, love etc. that become more heated as time goes on) that is assured to alienate most anyone without a minor in philosophy or the vocabulary of academic text.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    The characterizations are threadbare and simple: Saul and Zama are the downbeat 99% (his creepy mask recalls both Joker and Anonymous); Miller’s character represents soulless commerce. What Funny Face lacks in social commentary, however, it makes up for in mood.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    As darkly comic as it is foreboding–and boasting an outrageously rich and nuanced central performance from the great Icelandic actor Ingvar Sigurdsson, who plays the larger than life Ingimunder, a man more than capable of living up to the scale of his own name–A White, White Day takes the tropes of a psychological thriller but presents them with a virtuosic and austere visual flare.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Like the ramshackle family it so fondly depicts, Babyteeth is not without its flaws but it does suggest a confident new voice in independent cinema.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    In My Room is not so much about loss, but self-discovery.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Ema
    Ema is Larraín at his most freeform.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    As indebted to the mood and visual language of Game of Thrones as it is to the Bard’s texts, Michôd provides finely worked entertainment with a compelling and significant central performance from Chalamet–who frankly hasn’t had to carry a film in quite this way before.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    Jenkin’s script is peppered with comedy, occasionally of a more subtle variety than men dressed as penises—even if that drew the biggest laugh.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    The Laundromat is an air-tight, tumultuous info-graph about our rotten to the core financial systems and, in particular, the 2016 Mossack and Fonseca leak, when millions of the Panamanian law firm’s files were anonymously leaked to the press.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    For all its merits, however, Joker relies on perhaps a touch too much exposition as it attempts to shape a digestible origin story.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    Marriage Story shows Baumbach reaching an entirely new level in his most consummate film to date.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    Ad Astra is, for all other intents and purposes, as straight faced as they come, a film that considers the big questions of interplanetary travel and contact but signposts its conclusions too early–and can’t help getting bogged down by them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    Much like his beleaguered lead character, Jude manages to maintain a rousingly lewd sense of humor for the duration of the film’s substantial running time.

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