Rory O'Connor

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For 166 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rory O'Connor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 After the Storm
Lowest review score: 0 The Last Face
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 5 out of 166
166 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Making every moment grim is to risk over-saturation, but Davis and Holmer’s deft direction keeps things compelling here, skilfully leaving plenty of things unsaid and with the confidence to allow key events to happen offscreen or in the margins.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Rory O'Connor
    Pacifiction draws you in with its sense of mystery and surrealism and leaves you ultimately agog.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Shot in gorgeous natural light by Denis Lenoir (the cinematographer on all but one of her films since Eden), and backed by a soundtrack of typically esoteric needle-drops, the director delivers her finest in years by doing what she’s always done best: a humanistic story of when to love and when to let go.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    It’s dazzling and uneven, seductive and flawed, and only [Cronenberg] could have made it. There’s no beating the genuine article.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Its dizzying culmination of ideas proves more feature than bug.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    Ruben Östlund might like his fish in a barrel but he’s a ruthless shot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    As swings go, Three Thousand Years of Longing is a miss, but there is something infectious about Miller’s confidence here: you’re never too far from an idea to enjoy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    A fevered, hypnotizing, meticulously detailed period piece with a protagonist so monomaniacal the film could almost be considered high camp.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Brunner’s doom-metal vibe isn’t always easy on the eye, and while images in Luzifer shiver with portent as early as the opening frames–all muck, rain, and knackered-looking bodies––there is a clarity from cinematographer Peter Flinckenberg that saves it from being too sullen.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    It’s compelling viewing, if a bit uneasy—not just for the flashbacks to those early COVID days of respiratory machines and people in HAZMAT suits, or the film’s second half, which covers the lack of egalitarianism in the vaccine rollout, and how those decisions ravaged non-Western countries and accelerated the rise in variants.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    A rare and elusive sense of myth is captured in The Tale of King Crab.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Thomas’ Bravo, recalling both Mikey Saber and Mickey Rourke, has a protruding gut, slicked-back hair, an alcohol problem, and some deep-rooted mommy issues. The film is all his.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Drawing a number of deeply felt performances from her cast, it is an aching period piece, if frankly staid, that comes complete with many of the genre’s most reliable tropes: sharp intakes of breath; glances stolen through laced curtains; and love, as ever, in opprobrium.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    Yes, Dario Argento’s first film in ten years is pretty fun, for a while—and no, not near his best.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    It isn’t difficult to imagine Denis–one of the most cerebral, confounding filmmakers we have–constructing Fire, with its oddly trivial love triangle and omnipresent string section, as a duplicitous farce; a way to upend our expectations of how a film like this should look.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    All that flare and stealthy humor give the familiar sense of a young director attempting to flex every creative muscle at once. Seldom is this advised, yet it’s nothing if not thrilling to watch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    The experience is nothing if not grueling, and Fists‘ willingness to heap misery on characters who are already truly down ultimately leaves a callous taste in the mouth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Belle is the most ambitious work yet from Hosoda.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    It is a film of two contrasting halves: Solange’s warm and fuzzy naivety and her cold coming of age.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 67 Rory O'Connor
    It will sound like sacrilege, but Days could be the rare case of a Tsai Ming-liang film that doesn’t ever quite connect up and one that might even benefit from some cutting back.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    A Hero is perhaps a touch too sinuous and convoluted to be considered alongside his great early works, but it plays to his strengths and sensibilities—a clear return to form.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    It is a boiling-hot provocation: funny, revolting, spicy as hell, and with a striking subtext of gender fluidity and sexual identity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    At 145 minutes, few locations, and very little dialogue, this unflinching look at the fate that awaits us is anything but expeditious—yet it demands to be seen, a radical film with as much capacity to shock as it does to burden the tear ducts. It is amongst his very best.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Playing out at breakneck speed, it is awash with flights of fancy: outbursts of sex and violence; aliens and murder; sepia-dripped nostalgia; jarring temporal and spatial uncertainty; homoeroticism; etc. That sense of dizziness is only further confounded by Vlad Ogai’s shifting sets and richly detailed production design, and cinematographer Vladislav Opelyants’ long roving takes. Its cast has the sense of a troupe. The frame is always packed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    Hansen-Løve’s cinema has reached higher ceilings than this, but it is a restorative sojourn just the same.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Rory O'Connor
    It’s a graceful, aching film that sculpts and stretches Murakami’s story into an enchanting three-hour epic (my, do the minutes fly by) about trauma and mourning, shared solitude, and the possibility of moving on. The narrative also doubles as a lovely ode to the car itself, and the strange ways that people open up when cocooned inside them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    A blistering work of meta filmmaking.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Rory O'Connor
    Though ambitious in reach, its tone is one-note, stilted, and saccharine sweet; its ideas as disjointed as they are ultimately unsatisfying.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Rory O'Connor
    Verhoeven, as always, is more interested in playing games and is always at his best when needling an audience’s ideas of good taste.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Rory O'Connor
    A daring work of meta-filmmaking in which Hogg loops backwards to re-reexamine her own past.

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