Ryan Lattanzio

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For 28 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 14% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ryan Lattanzio's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 91 The Boys in the Band
Lowest review score: 33 Breaking News in Yuba County
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 28
  2. Negative: 1 out of 28
28 movie reviews
    • 24 Metascore
    • 33 Ryan Lattanzio
    It’s the kind of movie that seems to suck your soul out while you’re watching it, variably crass and slapstick humor landing with a bloody thud.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Ryan Lattanzio
    While it certainly offers up a necessary-if-dour vision of patriarchy-dominated life in this particular corner of Europe, by-the-numbers storytelling and a flat, visual style occasionally lead to dramatic intertia. Still, Gashi is powerfully, effectively steely as a woman who must take matters into her own hands, even when they are tied by society.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Ryan Lattanzio
    The film shimmers with beauty and sadness despite its length, and the Japanese director’s background as both a photographer and a documentary filmmaker brings a gossamer naturalism to this realistic tale about a young woman’s regrets over abandoning her child years after the fact.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Ryan Lattanzio
    Atlantis is a political howl from the soul about a decaying Europe. But its cold, violent exterior turns out to be a bleak disguise for what is an unexpectedly sweet love story at its molten core.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Ryan Lattanzio
    While the meandering sensibility of Acasa, My Home makes it a tough sit at times, the spell it casts through its all-access dive into subterranean life brought to the surface forms a compelling addition to one of international cinema’s deepest, and ever-growing, pockets.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Ryan Lattanzio
    The actors ably carry the script, as if aware they’re pawns in a genre exercise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    The actors’ gifts are all heightened by Msangi’s delicate touch in this empathetic portrait of immigrant life in America that is, refreshingly, less interested in big drama than in a family quietly building itself back up when it may be too late.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Ryan Lattanzio
    The pop icon’s stardom is so etched in concrete at this point that he could tell his fans just about anything and they would never stop listening. So it’s a pity that the documentary vehicle that surrounds him isn’t more forthcoming about the man beneath the wife beaters and airtight skinny jeans who sends so many swooning, but surely must, at times, feel lonely late at night like the rest of us.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Ryan Lattanzio
    This is a gentle and joyous film not to be slept on, even as its low-key aura lulls you into a soothed state of mind.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    Madre turns out to be the least twisted, and most empathetic, entry in the damaged mother movie canon in some time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    While the narrative hardly goes into the fully unhinged direction it teases, it’s pleasantly askew and always marching to its own strange and, slightly off, beat.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Ryan Lattanzio
    Chiseled as a haiku, director Wayne Wang’s Coming Home Again opens a window onto dying days in all their ugliness, but also onto their possibility of redemption for a mother and son.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ryan Lattanzio
    The script is half-baked and rushed, too much of a collage of other, better movies, and too coy to embrace its trashiness or ever go beyond PG-13 levels of horror.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Ryan Lattanzio
    Run
    There’s enough go-for-broke and whiplash-inducing shifts in tone on display to suggest this filmmaking duo has a future, even when their characters don’t seem to have a past.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Ryan Lattanzio
    The result is a sophisticated, tart-tongued revival, and a gayed-up “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” that surmounts the challenges faced by stage-to-screen adaptations, specifically the utter confinement to a single space.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    While the film, both written and directed by Lacôte, is grounded in oral traditions that may seem exotic to certain viewers, the movie is really about the universal power of storytelling regardless of tongue — and how it can be used as a way to survive.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Ryan Lattanzio
    There is no reason to care about anyone in Antonio Campos’ The Devil All the Time, a sweaty, bloated mess of a movie that flushes a knockout ensemble down the drain.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Ryan Lattanzio
    The Broken Hearts Gallery will fit snugly on the shelf for tweens and teens as a source of comfort and maybe even empowerment, an ode to rebuilding, when the dissolution of a relationship leaves you feeling like a husk of yourself.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Ryan Lattanzio
    The 24th means well, and while it, sadly, mostly elicits a shrug, what the film lacks in pizzaz it more than makes up for in educational value, for better or worse.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Ryan Lattanzio
    While Margiela’s visions likely deserve a more radical treatment onscreen, Holzemer’s film offers perhaps the most complete insight yet into one of fashion’s most elusive geniuses.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    Despite the claustrophobic entrapment in a violent and hyper-masculine world, The Shadow of Violence is an ultimately moving morality tale announcing a confident new voice in international cinema. Not to mention a powerful vehicle for its two leads, Jarvis and Barry Keoghan.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Ryan Lattanzio
    The origins of the room in question are never explained, which is half the intrigue, but mostly the frustration. The core conceit is enough to make The Room a not entirely wasted ride. Still, enter with care. It’s a mixed bag, but upon exit, it somehow runs through the mind.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    While the film is hardly as transgressive as its subject, it manages to be unexpectedly moving, and a nostalgic time capsule of an art-world rebel whose unorthodox methods and decidedly politically incorrect vision couldn’t exist today.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Ryan Lattanzio
    Relic exists firmly in the realm of allegory, and if you’re looking for answers to the film’s spooky ambiguities and uncanny set pieces, you won’t find them. James is more concerned with creating an atmospheric rumination on intergenerational trauma, death, and dying that also happens to be a striking horror movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Ryan Lattanzio
    It’s a clever exercise in no-frills science fiction that should please fans of the genre, but it’s more than just a sci-fi exercise thanks to a script that prioritizes, and cares about, its characters.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ryan Lattanzio
    The movie’s topple into melodramatic excess is fitting for a film set in the 1960s, a time dominated by melodramas. And also like the cinema of the 1960s, there’s a grit and urgency to To the Stars, of something bigger and darker coming along with the changing times.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Ryan Lattanzio
    Though hardly subtle in its metaphoric intent, this story of a rural cult of all women, segregated into “sisters” and “wives,” led by a single powerful man makes for an unnervingly effective thriller dripping with atmosphere and foreshadowing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Ryan Lattanzio
    In these trying times, you generally can’t go too wrong with Almost Love, a film where, for the most part, everyone is nice to each other and just trying to be a good person. But the third act becomes a pile-up of soap-operatic incidents that try too hard to advance plot arcs . . . that are less interesting than the spiky, perky characters at their center.

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