For 56 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sam C. Mac's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 To the Ends of the Earth
Lowest review score: 25 Lady Macbeth
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 37 out of 56
  2. Negative: 8 out of 56
56 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    Song Fang’s latest moves glacially along in a largely unchanging emotional register, always keeping us at a distance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 25 Sam C. Mac
    Walt Disney’s Mulan remake perfunctorily recycles the worst aspects of the 1998 animated version and roundly fails to convincingly execute the few deviations that it does attempt.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Sam C. Mac
    If Kurosawa is less interested in narrative dynamics, it’s because he’s focused on an acute understanding of societally and sociologically conditioned behavior.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    The hegemony of history is rigid, but Lou Ye is still able to disrupt it in the form of its representation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    The film’s masterstroke is that its fugitive antiheroes are framed by an environment that reflects their criminal lives back at them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    The film succeeds as a stingingly personal missive aimed squarely at Brazil’s right-wing president.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    The only thing that keeps Parasite just slightly below the tier of Bong’s best work, namely The Host and his underrated and similarly themed 2000 debut film, Barking Dogs Never Bite, is the overstuffed pile-up of incident that occurs toward the end.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Sam C. Mac
    The film is Quentin Tarantino’s magnum opus—a sweeping statement on an entire generation of American popular culture and an almost expressionistic rendering of the counterculture forming at its margins, gradually growing in influence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Robert Eggers loosens the noose of veracity that choked his meticulously researched but painfully self-serious debut just enough to allow for so much absurdism to peek through.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Terrence Malick’s film means to seek out souls caught in the tide of history, but which move against its current.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    Pedro Almodóvar’s latest only occasionally captures the spry, comedic rhythms and impassioned intensity of his finest work.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    Bruno Dumont seems perpetually aware of the trap of familiarity, which may be why he indulges in some of his most inscrutable filmmaking.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    Bertrand Bonello’s quixotic, slow-burn genre film is political largely in the abstract.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    In Jim Jarmusch’s film, what starts as a subtle undercurrent of knowing humor curdles into overt self-referentiality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Where The Projectionist ultimately excels ... is as the kind of cultural microcosm that makes Ferrara’s other documentaries feel at once urgent and incredibly rich in their broader implications.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    It’s through exercising a certain kind of madness that the film connects even at its most disjointed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    Creed II is absent of both the topically political atmosphere of Rocky IV and the bravura action of Ryan Coogler's Creed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    It reveals itself as neither committed New Wave subversion nor skillful homage, but rather a weak and uninspired imitation.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    Ying Liang’s film is righteously and vigorously angry about injustices committed by the Chinese government.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 38 Sam C. Mac
    Instead of offering a probing, nuanced view of the burgeoning technologies and sciences involved in this relatively new outgrowth of the OBGYN industry, though, Tamara Jenkins uses her setting as fodder for lame and discomfiting physical comedy.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it’s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives Dead Souls its authority—and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    It’s a quixotic and profound statement on the spatial and temporal dissonances that inform life in 21st-century China.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Spike Lee styles the film as a popular entertainment, forgoing the theatrical satire typical of his late-period state-of-the-nation joints, like Bamboozled and Chi-Raq, and settling into the accessible rhythms of the contemporary sitcom.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 100 Sam C. Mac
    The film becomes an even broader consideration of individual fascinations and follies, of ways of responding to art without the boundaries of morality and reason.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Whenever Panahi's architecturally rigorous study of the self, society, and artistic communion threatens to get too self-conscious or loaded, the filmmaker tends to leaven the tension with humor and gentle irreverence.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    The film is most exhilarating as a breathless vessel for mood, one that just so happens to conduct itself within reconstructed period settings that are as obsessively detailed as the reverently curated soundtrack.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    Asghar Farhadi falls back on the expository dialogue and dubious perspectival shifts that he frequently resorts to as a means of wrapping up knotty narratives.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Sam C. Mac
    Michel Hazanavicius co-opts Jean-Luc Godard's personal life for cheap prestige-picture sentiment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Stephen Loveridge fully understands that even the trifurcated title of his film may not be entirely equipped at capturing the extent of M.I.A.'s many-faceted identity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    The latest entrant in this now-Disney-owned franchise is largely content to further the themes and narrative strategies of J.J. Abrams's predecessor.

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