For 36 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 73% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sam C. Mac's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The House That Jack Built
Lowest review score: 25 A Ghost Story
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 36
  2. Negative: 6 out of 36
36 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    The anguish expressed and experiences described by the survivors certainly can overlap with each other, and even become repetitive, but it’s ultimately this unification of perspective that gives Dead Souls its authority—and that allows it to become an incisive reappropriation of collectivist solidarity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    It’s a quixotic and profound statement on the spatial and temporal dissonances that inform life in 21st-century China.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Spike Lee styles the film as a popular entertainment, forgoing the theatrical satire typical of his late-period state-of-the-nation joints, like Bamboozled and Chi-Raq, and settling into the accessible rhythms of the contemporary sitcom.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 100 Sam C. Mac
    The film becomes an even broader consideration of individual fascinations and follies, of ways of responding to art without the boundaries of morality and reason.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Whenever Panahi's architecturally rigorous study of the self, society, and artistic communion threatens to get too self-conscious or loaded, the filmmaker tends to leaven the tension with humor and gentle irreverence.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    The film is most exhilarating as a breathless vessel for mood, one that just so happens to conduct itself within reconstructed period settings that are as obsessively detailed as the reverently curated soundtrack.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    Asghar Farhadi falls back on the expository dialogue and dubious perspectival shifts that he frequently resorts to as a means of wrapping up knotty narratives.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Sam C. Mac
    Michel Hazanavicius co-opts Jean-Luc Godard's personal life for cheap prestige-picture sentiment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Stephen Loveridge fully understands that even the trifurcated title of his film may not be entirely equipped at capturing the extent of M.I.A.'s many-faceted identity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    The latest entrant in this now-Disney-owned franchise is largely content to further the themes and narrative strategies of J.J. Abrams's predecessor.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Call Me by Your Name is a fairly straightforward coming-of-age story that's at its finest in moments when the relationships take on larger meanings than their literal context implies, and Luca Guadagnino finds evocative aesthetic expressions for them.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Yance Ford’s film builds into an emotionally, intellectually, and aesthetically complex work of essay and memoir.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 25 Sam C. Mac
    An empty exercise in imitative long-take aestheticism, A Ghost Story fills its distractingly round-cornered frame with endless repetitions on a visual gag.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    The film leaves the lasting impression of a story that takes place in its own elitist and hermetically sealed world.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Sam C. Mac
    Sleight never shows much interest in exploring how blackness can inform its genre's tropes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Sam C. Mac
    The film is neatly organized around not only the changing of the seasons, but a Disney-branded "circle of life" ethos.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 25 Sam C. Mac
    It isn't until its final moments that Lady Macbeth turns into the kind of meaningless, mean-spirited, and proudly irredeemable non-character study that likens it to, say, last year's emptily foreboding Childhood of a Leader.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    Beach Rats is most compelling when it puts a self-aware focus on Harris Dickinson’s sculpted male figure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    Rogue One is less the fetish object that The Force Awakens is because it at least has the ambitions to create its own character dynamics and plot routes rather than coast on existing ones.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    The film's searching images counterpoint the hyper-articulate methodology of its characters' sense of imbalance and uncertainty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Loving finds little grooves of humanity to explore in its characters, and in its milieu, in between expected plot beats.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Sam C. Mac
    Yourself and Yours‘s commitment to its various extreme ambiguities is a crucial facet of the film’s success.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    It's pock-marked by the conservative dramatic conventions and broad political gestures that have marred much of Ken Loach's recent output.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    What tends to right Moonlight, even when Barry Jenkins's filmmaking drifts into indulgence, is the strength of its actors.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Derek Cianfrance's film is a beautifully sustained study in adult themes of emotional crisis.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Sam C. Mac
    Cameraperson is certainly a collection of memorable images, but it's more so Johnson's facility with narrative, on a micro and macro level, that impresses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    Stark Trek Beyond emphasizes the inter-personal dynamics of the USS Enterprise, and functions best as an extended team-building exercise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Sam C. Mac
    Brady Corbet reaches for a dreary self-importance akin to Michael Haneke’s The White Ribbon.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sam C. Mac
    The simmering insinuations of Nicolas Winding Refn's film eventually flower into full-on exploitation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Sam C. Mac
    The issue with X-Men: Apocalypse is that Bryan Singer suggests so many possible directions to go in and still chooses the least interesting one.

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