For 550 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Stewart's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Gloria Bell
Lowest review score: 0 Would You Rather
Score distribution:
550 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Action flick machismo suffers an identity crisis in Stuber.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Midsommar is no slouch on chills, but they creep up slowly, like a bad trip from one of the Swedes’ festive glasses of hallucinogenic tea, and are leavened with an occasional dash of humor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    The satire’s so meta that its whiny protagonists threaten to eclipse the joke.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Annabelle Comes Home is so low stakes it’s barely a movie — more like a very special “Brady Bunch” episode in hell.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Tremblay is charming as an eccentric kid marching to his own tune, but the film’s attention wanders like a goat separated from its herd.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The scrappy striver narrative may be an overly familiar one at this point, but director Tom Harper (the BBC’s “War & Peace”) gets a terrific performance from Buckley as Rose chases her dreams while living the kind of turbulent life that has always inspired the best of country songs.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Even with a title this generic, there’s less to Murder Mystery than meets the eye.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Plus One is the latest evidence (see also: “Always Be My Maybe”) that the romantic comedy is making a long-awaited comeback, with some overdue modern tweaks.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Even with a cast this lovable, The Dead Don’t Die falls short of the killer zom-com it could have been.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    It has no real reason to exist, other than to be a passable option for parents whose children are too young to handle PG-13 fare and feels like it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    Domino, though, is the dregs: This thriller may be randomly set one year in the future, yet it’s hopelessly regressive — a parade of lame stereotypes that feels directed by an out-of-touch Old Hollywood old guy (De Palma is 78).
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    The Poison Rose doesn’t aspire to transcend any clichés, and judging from the flagging energy level of the actors, everyone involved knows it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Q Ball is a moving and dynamically shot portrait of the Northern California prison’s basketball team, which is sponsored by the NBA champion Golden State Warriors.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Zoey Deutch is fine in a non-demanding role as the requisite starry-eyed female student, and Danny Huston (“Wonder Woman”) gives us a softer side as Richard’s weepy best friend. But this is, at its core, a one-man show, and given the uncertain future of Depp’s career (being axed from the “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise, for example), it might also have been titled “Johnny Says Goodbye.”
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Hogg (“Exhibition”) sets The Souvenir in the 1980s but shoots her subjects with the long-armed reserve of a period piece; the ivory-complexioned Byrne bears a resemblance to 18th- and 19th-century European portraits glimpsed throughout.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Sara Stewart
    In a time when climate news is near-uniformly depressing, this is a nature documentary that pays loving and hopeful tribute to the complex web of life — and it won’t scare your kids.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Sara Stewart
    Poehler isn’t quite cynical enough to pull off a comedy in which, to paraphrase “Seinfeld,” there’s no hugging and learning, but Wine Country could have been improved by keeping its emotional scenes more in reserve — like a high-end cabernet.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Would it have been tacky to visually play up the connection between Tolkien’s harrowing experiences on the WWI battlefield and his depiction of Mordor in the books? Perhaps. Beyond the briefest of allusions, Karukoski tastefully leaves that to the imagination. But this — like much of the film — is a tastefulness that induces sleepiness. Tolkien’s estate was not supportive of this film, understandably: The legendary author’s work is memorial enough.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    At stark odds with the director’s earlier work is the color palette of this one — that is to say, the film is nearly devoid of it, a haunting wash of multilayered grays. This is one Shadow that deserves to be in the spotlight.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    It’s blessed with an ace comic foil in Theron, who out-snarks Rogen in scene after scene. The duo makes a terrifically fun on-screen couple, with the kind of zingy banter (thanks to Dan Sterling and Liz Hannah’s screenplay) found in black-and-white movies pre-dating the term “rom-com.”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    At a certain point, the pattern of Knoop’s reticence, then acquiescence to Albert’s masquerade becomes slightly repetitive, but JT LeRoy still gives a compelling inside look at the head-scratching hoax that succeeded, in part, due to musty notions of what a hot shot writer ought to look like.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    The movie’s one saving grace — so to speak — is Raymond Cruz (Tuco from “Better Call Saul”) as a priest turned shaman. He, at least, injects a little wry humor into a film that otherwise bored me to tears.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Elisabeth Moss is a primal, predatory force in Her Smell, a female-centric spin on the classic debauched rock star story.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Ultimately Unicorn Store shows little appeal beyond, perhaps, a young-adult audience with a very high tolerance for glitter.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    As actor pairings go, you couldn’t hope for better than Oscar winner Sam Rockwell and nominee Taraji P. Henson. So why is The Best of Enemies such a slog?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The film manages to be both hopeful and devastating — and recommended viewing for anyone who subscribes to the facile notion that abused women should “just leave.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Us
    Us is more expansive and messier, a Rorschach blot of a movie, riffing on primal fears and a raft of ’80s references. Is it a pointed cultural take or just a gleeful scare-fest? It depends on what you choose to take from it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    It’s Schoenaerts, one of this generation’s finest actors, who makes The Mustang a moving look at human potential for redemption and rehabilitation.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Stewart
    Salma Hayek, as their vengeful ex-boss Eva Torres, is fun to watch as she plots to outwit them time and again, but ultimately, there’s no one here to really care about.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Sara Stewart
    There isn’t a moment of I’m Not Here that didn’t have me fervently wishing I wasn’t here.

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