For 78 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sarah Ward's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 90 Girl Asleep
Lowest review score: 30 The 5th Wave
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 59 out of 78
  2. Negative: 2 out of 78
78 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    Finding its genial, quirky groove early, John Sheedy’s family film flirts with tweeness but ultimately bubbles with the same spark as its can-do protagonist.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    Diving deep into dark material yet always remaining afloat, it’s a potent feature debut from Australian filmmaker Rodd Rathjen.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sarah Ward
    As fascinating as the film’s production process proves, it’s the results of their creative labours that entrance and enchant.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Sarah Ward
    For a film so tied to a thoroughbred showcase, this broad crowd-pleaser blatantly relies on well-worn parts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    In its most poignant, resonant moments, the film feels both devastatingly personal and affectingly revelatory: a simultaneously forceful and tender piece of existential contemplation that’s intricately tied to Wilczynski’s life but still universal in its themes. But when it meanders, which is perhaps more often than it should, it requires serious commitment from its audience.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Sarah Ward
    The Gentlemen is a disposable crime caper on autopilot. Propped up by an all-star ensemble, particularly the sturdy Charlie Hunnam and scene-stealer Colin Farrell, Guy Ritchie reclaims the genre that brought him to fame but does little more than shuffle battered parts into an intermittently entertaining configuration.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Sarah Ward
    Never making an obvious move, like its subject, the end result veers close to avant-garde. That’s a term that Cunningham himself famously and continually shunned; however Kovgan clearly doesn’t share the same concern.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Sarah Ward
    Angel of Mine isn’t without its bumps, but its equally challenging and cathartic payoff is worth the journey.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    If any colour represents the long-term impact of war, it’s the blend of beige and grey that fills The Load’s quietly powerful frames.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 90 Sarah Ward
    In pairing the aftermath of a natural disaster with the minefield that is female adolescence, it proves its own surreal, savage and superbly performed creation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    While the narrative’s dramas feel paper-thin, even as they touch upon timely themes of equality, multiculturalism and the treatment of refugees, the feature’s optimism always shines.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Sarah Ward
    An energetic, irreverent, autobiographically inspired affair filled with key swapping, children running amok and a rotting 200-tonne whale, the film proves a mixed bag but, given the era on display, its messiness always feels appropriate.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    If the film didn’t rest on such composed performances, it might have conjured melodramatic disbelief, but the excellent Fehling and Montgomery play their pivotal figures with the requisite nuance.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Sarah Ward
    The feature’s heart is in the right place, especially in advocating that age shouldn’t be a barrier. But Poms is a by-the-numbers feature which couples its empowering message with routine gags and muddled conflict.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sarah Ward
    Unrelenting as its tone may be, the feature proves a delicately layered, deftly shot work that makes an incisive statement about the prevalence of apathy, arrogance and egotism in contemporary China and beyond.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    Petrunya is careful to maintain the ideal balance, parodying the ridiculous response to its protagonist but never downplaying its realism.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sarah Ward
    Mascaro’s striking aesthetics give the film a texture and atmosphere that aligns the audience firmly with its protagonist; she’s seeking transcendence, and the movie she’s in approximates it one lustrous frame at a time.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    The Breaker Upperers might suffer from a too-neat third act, but it wins hearts and hearty guffaws along the way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    [An] earnest, entertaining and imaginative old-meets-new adventure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    In addition to the obviously authentic rapport between the quietly compelling Hill and impressive first-timer Perham, populating the feature’s frames with as many non-actors as possible also adds detail and texture.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    The film’s coming-of-age story might remain familiar, its emotional arc may be broad, and its messages about self-belief and taking chances fall into the tried-and-tested camp, but DeBlois still builds an engaging, sincere and tender world brimming with depth and detail.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Sarah Ward
    Grimly upbeat rather than merry, and relentless rather than frenetic, the film’s gritty zest is splashed across the screen with momentum, but also to the point of overuse. It serves a late heist set piece well, yet wears thin in a sea of training, thieving and fighting montages elsewhere.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Sarah Ward
    As predictable as their tale may be, Chaplin, Tena and Verdaguer serve their characters well, with the former and latter particularly impressing with the material.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    Though the film doesn’t scrounge too deeply, offbeat gags, ample emotion and parallels with human nature all go hand-in-hand.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    Distinctive 2D animation mixes graffiti-strewn, street-level realism with playful stylisation...for an aesthetically striking, instantly immersive and highly memorable end result.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Sarah Ward
    Try as he might, Rowan Atkinson’s slapstick pratfalls and rubbery expressions can’t stretch over the feature’s brazen attempt to rehash past glories.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Sarah Ward
    It’s a playful inversion of the bigfoot legend, cautioning against unthinking compliance, championing curiosity and encouraging putting oneself in another’s shoes (or feet). Still, this all-ages affair is as blunt as it is busy; children will warm to the movie’s ceaseless energy, but parents might take longer to thaw.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Sarah Ward
    Writer/director Anthony Maras largely sticks to the dramatisation playbook, but does so in an effective, affecting and empathetic fashion.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Sarah Ward
    This essential documentary is necessarily, unflinchingly grim; the cinematic equivalent of walking in the survivors’ shoes, and a complex, challenging but crucial viewing experience that burrows its immense sorrows deep into the audience’s bones.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Sarah Ward
    If The Nun leaves a haunting impression, it’s of a missed opportunity to capitalise upon a visually distinctive antagonist within an existing hit series. The end result feels like an exercise in joining obvious franchise dots and paving the way for future films.

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