Sheila O'Malley

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For 458 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sheila O'Malley's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Lost Daughter
Lowest review score: 0 The Haunting of Sharon Tate
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 61 out of 458
458 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    All My Puny Sorrows has all the elements to pack a devastating punch, but there's no real sense of urgency. It's like people are just marking time, like the end has already been determined, it's just a matter of resigning oneself to the inevitable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    There are some similarities in all of this to Joachim Trier's "The Worst Person in the World" (particularly the women’s hairstyles, as well as all that running), but the mood and tone is entirely different, less meditative, less mournful.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    "Stanleyville" is part Stanford Prison Experiment and part MTV's "The Real World." It's part Milgram experiment and part "Squid Game."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    Even with the excellent central performance by Karen Gillan, playing a "dual" role—herself and her own copy—Dual makes for a strangely tepid viewing experience. Deeper exploration is not on the table.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Sheila O'Malley
    My soul rejected what I was seeing. My response was: What in the Uncanny Valley is going on here?
    • 34 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The film is best in its embrace of the random, its moments when the talented and funny cast goof off with each other, responding to one another's eccentricities.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The final sequences are the only "stock" moments in this very specific family drama, and something about the last scene left me cold. But the rest is so effective and emotional, a dedicated portrait of trauma passed down through generations, it doesn't matter.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    An engaging and sneakily profound film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Huda's Salon does not stop for one second to take a breath, and the subjects revealed have enormous and urgent philosophical reverb.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Cyrano gets the big things right, and Dinklage embodies it all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Strawberry Mansion sacrifices nothing. It's whimsical but it's poignant, it's light-hearted and it's deep.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Catch the Fair One is a revenge-thriller, and a satisfying one, since the evil on display is so total. However, the satisfaction is hollow. Hopelessness is the dominant mood.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Last Looks works best in its twisted often-incoherent plot, where no character is generic. Everyone has a secret. No one is on the level. Surfaces lie.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Sheila O'Malley
    It's a vast understatement to say that Vonda McIntyre's book deserved way better treatment than this.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    Borrego, an awkward thriller pasted onto a moody strangers-forging-a-connection drama, doesn't allow itself to be what it so clearly wants to be.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Sheila O'Malley
    Harrowing, unpredictable, painful, confrontational, this is a movie for grown-ups.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Cinematographer Samuel Calvin is to be commended for his striking work, and Reece shows an intuitive understanding of when to move the camera, and—more importantly—when not to move the camera. It's all very elegantly put together.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Writing with Fire is a powerful piece of work, although it moves at a mostly slow and steady pace.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Of all of the things Tatiana Huezo captures in Prayers for the Stolen, her first narrative feature, the terror of the night is most unnerving.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Cusp, with its dreamy imagery of golden sunsets and thunder-y twilights, empty Dairy Queen parking lots, and birds taking flight, is a mood-driven piece of work, sensitive to landscape and environment, and the girls' casual comments about rape (just one example) stand in stark contrast.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    It's one of those rare films where the title has real meaning, one that grows in power the moment the credits roll.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Sheila O'Malley
    The Souvenir Part II is more, though, than Julie's progression towards a completed film. It could be called, with apologies to James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Sheila O'Malley
    The movie may be hard to explain, but it's very fun to watch. It's a fast-paced delirious movie about a very slow unchanging world.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Luzzu is a moving portrait of a world in flux, and one man attempting to survive the changes thrust upon him by a baffling outside world.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Sheila O'Malley
    Written and directed by Aharon Keshales, whose debut (2010's Rabies) was an attention-getting nail-biter, South of Heaven—with a couple of exceptions—is inert and unimaginative.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Titane, this year's Palme d'Or winner at the Cannes Film Festival, is an extreme movie, violent and pitiless and funny, but the space it provides for not just tenderness but contemplation makes it an "extremely" thought-provoking film as well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    The Mad Women's Ball is part psychodrama and part melodrama, and it wears those mantles proudly and confidently. Each scene throbs with urgency and emotion. Nothing is unimportant. At the same time, the film is highly controlled, with a taut assured script.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    Blue Bayou is sunk, on occasion, by its own symbolism, and how it wields said symbols. It's not enough to use a symbol visually, and let the audience put two and two together. A character needs to have a long monologue where they explain the symbol and pontificate on how the symbol is relevant to the circumstances.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    The script is often very witty, peppered with sharp observations and two very entertaining performances, but there are underlying problems the movie cannot overcome.

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