For 71 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Simran Hans' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 An Elephant Sitting Still
Lowest review score: 20 Bel Canto
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 71
  2. Negative: 1 out of 71
71 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    The film lurches into conventional horror-thriller territory as it progresses, though there are interesting moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    The CGI critters are seamlessly integrated with the 35mm cinematography, the film stock’s grain smoothing the visual tackiness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Simran Hans
    The gravitational pull of sex, death and the void is palpable.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    Writer-director Victor Levin’s caustic take on the romcom works better as a treatise on the genre than as an example of it. The staging of the individual scenes feels like an afterthought, with the stars and script doing all the heavy lifting. Still, the scaffolding is there.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Simran Hans
    Clearly, it’s intended as a vehicle for Wilson, who is credited as co-producer, but it’s Hathaway who steals the show.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    The dilemma she presents is ethical: is it fair to ask someone to traumatise (or retraumatise) themselves for the sake of art? Rather boldly, it seems as though Decker is also asking the question of herself.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Simran Hans
    This one hits its stride somewhere in the middle, bounding confidently towards its hopeless, poetic conclusion.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Simran Hans
    There’s a tepid, cross-cultural romantic comedy trapped inside this televisual hostage drama. The reliable Moore is trapped too. Even she can’t animate the material, leaving the graphic denouement feeling like a bum note.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    The final battle is giddily cathartic, but the catharsis arises from prioritising character development over plot and spectacle. This, I imagine, will be the Avengers’ legacy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    Mostly, though, as a B-movie, Greta works; the moments in which it leans into its own silliness are its best.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    Directed by Tina Gordon Chism, co-writer of What Men Want, the film is cute enough, even if key ideas aren’t especially novel: it’s lonely at the top; we need to connect with our inner child; everyone is insecure as a teenager.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Simran Hans
    The attempts at authentic stoner dialogue soon become tedious, with too little plot or character development grounding the inanity (Hill’s self-written script also features an eyebrow-raising overuse of the N-word).
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    Inviolata is Italian for “unspoiled”, and the word could apply to its people as much as their straw-gold land.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    The film feels more like an elbow in the ribs than a slap on the wrist, revelling in the miscommunications between Susan the Sasquatch’s literal-minded monkey brain.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    The film’s sometimes tiresome sense of humour is laddish in its embrace of viscera (blood, boils, vomit and live spiders all feature), but as the narrative trots (or, rather, plods) along, its men are revealed to be endearingly less so.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    There’s a sense of Stranger Things camaraderie among Billy and his foster siblings, who are actually fun to spend time with, and the film’s message of found family is a sweet one. Still, its overblown finale overstays its welcome, teeing up the team as mainstays in the inevitable sequel.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    Cameos from Pete Davidson and 30 Rock’s Tracy Morgan are enjoyable diversions but the jokes themselves are less high-concept, hinging on the men’s thoughts, which are mostly predictable (and predictably crass).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    The material feels more like a play than a film, its drama shrunk down into a single, digestible day, but it’s affecting in its muted seriousness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    Rafeea, a non-professional actor and Syrian refugee, is the film’s secret weapon. At times, the tragedy unfolding on screen feels borderline unwatchable, but his strange, fascinating, eerily adult face offers a litany of minute expressions. There is a wisdom, a soulfulness, and an icy, angry candour that feels lived rather than performed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    Simon’s fly-on-the-wall mode is a distancing tool, but shouldn’t be confused with ambivalence. Exposing the mechanics of decision-making is an implicit reproof of increasing conservatism, both of La Fémis itself and the film-makers they are producing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Simran Hans
    I’m a huge fan of Cornish’s 2011 debut Attack the Block, but this film isn’t nearly as energetic or enjoyably wacky as its predecessor. In fairness, it’s pitched at a considerably younger audience, but at two hours it drags; less patient children may struggle.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    The tone is weird, seesawing between broad comedy (Tig Notaro and Octavia Spencer as hardened adoption agency workers) and manipulative melodrama (I hate to admit it, but a standoff between Pete, Ellie and Lizzy moved me to tears).
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Simran Hans
    At times, it feels as though we’re watching something we’re not supposed to be seeing, such is the detail of the emotional degradation on show; in this sense, it’s impossible not to read it as something of a nihilistic suicide note.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    Kechiche is quite brilliant at using stretches of time to create space for actors to let their characters breathe. It’s a sleight of hand that makes the intimacy on screen seem as though it’s unfolding organically, deployed to particularly dexterous effect in one sequence that takes place in a bar.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Simran Hans
    The film feels thin, drab and ultimately unable to harness the collective power of its otherwise talented cast.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Simran Hans
    I like Branagh’s eye for landscapes too; space is used elegantly, while widescreen canvases glow green and orange.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    The final set piece is a little protracted, but the jokes are mostly sharp and enjoyably self-referential and the songs still catchy (one track is titled Catchy Song).
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Simran Hans
    For a movie about the undead, Japanese director Shin’ichirô Ueda’s horror comedy is certainly lively.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Simran Hans
    There are a few rascally moments, such as Jim Broadbent settingoff roman candles in his back garden, but mostly it’s a staid affair, laden with dragged-outscenes of the gang doing thejob.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Simran Hans
    Mimicking the relapse-recovery cycle of addiction, the film’s timeline moves in unsatisfying narrative circles that stall the already shallow stakes.

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