Sonia Saraiya

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For 66 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sonia Saraiya's Scores

Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 95 Fleabag: Season 2
Lowest review score: 10 Insatiable: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 46 out of 66
  2. Negative: 3 out of 66
66 tv reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    The show’s emphasis on Sofie—and in particular, the cult she was involved with—seems to come at the expense of its desire to shed light on Australian immigration.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Space Force doesn’t have quite enough story for its first 10 episodes—though these days, that’s par for the course for the first season of a streaming show. What the series does have, in spades, is a much more ineffable quality: tone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Search Party is both over-the-top and fantastically understated. It simmers with the high drama set in motion by its first season finale, but is set in an airless world that has no space for moral reckoning.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    Strictly speaking, it works better than it should. There’s so much sunk into the production that the world of the show really comes alive, and the mystery is engrossing and unpredictable. ... . But the story doesn’t let us into [Sister Alice (Tatiana Maslany) and her controlling mother's] interior lives quite enough. It’s a glaringly deficiency, because the series spends altogether too much time wading in the shallows of the men’s feelings—be it Perry, E.B., or one of the dozen-odd suits that end up holding significant information.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s a wild balance to strike, and if the show can’t quite keep all its plates spinning at once, it makes the moments where the show comes together pop with exceptional clarity. At its best, I May Destroy You ruffles your feathers unpleasantly, creating moments that trigger an urge to laugh uncontrollably commingled with a sense of spreading unease.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    There’s something loving about this homage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Line Of Duty makes an excellent effort at modern British life. It does fall short in places, but I give it a lot of credit for trying.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    What follows is a soapy, ambitious sci-fi season that takes big swings and follows through, engaging with not just class struggle but also leadership, loyalty, compromise, and coalition.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The series presents life as something that happens simultaneously with music—not just adjacent to it, but surrounded by it. Refreshingly, the camerawork tells the story without gimmicks—no slo-mo, no flashbacks, no dream sequences. The result is that time, too, seems to be composed of music, moving forward at the same tempo.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Parks and Rec delivered to its fans what the show is famous for: Hope, sweetness, enthusiasm, and light comedy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Beyond illustrating the angst of their mutual attraction with a thousand penetrating angles, Normal People’s TV adaptation fails as both an adaptation and as a standalone show. Without the details of the book, the story is featureless erotica, 12 episodes of two gorgeous people struggling to handle the implications of their ferocious attraction. ... The series strips Rooney’s novel of much of the tone and detail that makes Connell and Marianne worth reading about.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    A breezy, delightful season of television, practically built for quarantine marathon-watching. Its twists are fairly predictable, and its drollery is openly derivative of other teen hits—Riverdale, Glee, and Sex Education, in particular. But you don’t watch something like this because it’s innovative; you watch it because it feels good to consume as much of it as possible.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Run is distinctively Jones’ voice, but it has a lot of what made Waller-Bridge’s work so popular: dark humor, unstable chemistry, razor-sharp editing, and a narrow focus on the contradictions of human intimacy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    The show is committed to fascinating female characters—and it’s particularly rewarding to watch Oh perform her character’s deep grief and despair, lending surprising dignity to her disheveled sweatpants and plastic bags. But something about the humor skews horribly wrong. Villanelle has become so murderous that it's difficult to enjoy her humor. ... Killing Eve feels safe.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Sonia Saraiya
    With astonishing nuance, Mrs. America pulls together the threads of the feminist movement at this moment, noting the discord between some and the rapport between others. The series really sings once it’s populated by these other characters—each singularly appealing, each attempting to define marriage, feminism, and the movement for themselves as they go.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    While illustrating his psyche, the show refuses to minimize Joe/Will’s actions, either. And in this season, as in the last, our antihero desires to be better, even though he can never quite manage it. As his life spirals out of control again, You challenges us with his good intentions, his troubled past, and his endless need to be loved.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    There is, empirically, way too much going on. But Truth Be Told is romp, albeit kind of a gory one. The story is ridiculous, and gloriously so. ... It can be a bit much, but the show earns it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    Nostalgic wish fulfillment carries the show further than it has any right to—but it’s not enough to make eight episodes cohere into a season, or for three seasons to cohere into a story. ... Maisel’s greatest character is none of the series regulars. It’s Luke Kirby’s take on real-life comedy great Lenny Bruce.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Sonia Saraiya
    The season makes for a less sexy, more studied viewing experience. The first half of the season, which focuses on political skirmishes in the late ‘60s, is especially slow going. ... The new cast is impressive, but The Crown has lost a bit of its verve.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    If you love watching a bunch of armored space soldiers shooting at each other with blasters, you’ll have nothing to complain about. But—sans history, motivation, or facial expressions—it rings a bit hollow, lacking the achingly human element of the Star Wars universe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Sonia Saraiya
    It’s an intensely faithful adaptation of the books, in a way that tends to bog down the suspense and pace of the story. ... The adaptation is, as a result, flatter and more conventional than the book deserves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    To be sure, Peak Content has demonstrated a bit too much fondness for the “[notable figure], but cool” dramatic premise, which has yielded both hits (Riverdale) and bombs (remember Will?). But Dickinson has so much to imagine about Emily—and such a sense of humor—that the idea feels fresh.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Essays are round pegs, and episodes are square holes; few installments of Modern Love carry enough dramatic heft or character work to be worth the effort, and none retain what is so lovely and sharp-edged about the prose that inspired them.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    The show is so ambitious, with its multiple timelines, storytelling structures, and perspectives, that it’s perpetually surprising.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    There’s something hot, heady, and transporting about this fantasy of shared rule—a world full of treasures ready for the taking, a woman in charge, and a man who adores her without hesitation. ... Catherine the Great reframes her desire as part of her glory—and revels in that glory, without asking too many awkward questions
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Sonia Saraiya
    Ultimately, the world is much more interesting than the spree of murders within it, or the love story, such as it is, between Philo and Vinny. Carnival Row has built a fascinating metaphor for colonial power, resettlement, and migration—but doesn't quite know what to do with all that raw material.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    The first 20-ish minutes are the most honest work Ansari has done, a litany of observations about the status quo that reveals a hunger and frustration that was buried under his happy-go-lucky persona. ... There’s a bit of flab, especially in the back half. ... But whatever soul-searching or image management that Ansari has gone through since the babe.net story has made him a better performer—one who is more able to dwell in gray areas of comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Sonia Saraiya
    Based on how wonky and uneven the tone is this season, it feels as if Stranger Things has no idea how to raise its emotional stakes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Sonia Saraiya
    Season seven is the most satisfying it’s been in years because the story gets the chance to lay itself to rest. It’s the same show, but tweaked and trimmed, well-oiled and screwed-down, to a few major relationships in a few essential places.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Sonia Saraiya
    Specificity might have helped Euphoria be less provocative—these aren’t your kids, they’re some kids—but frankly, that would have been besides the point. Euphoria wants to provoke. That’s what the cool kids do.

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