Sophie Gilbert

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For 202 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sophie Gilbert's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Documentary Now!: Season 3
Lowest review score: 20 Space Force: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 202
202 tv reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    It’s wacky, unsettling, and remarkably assured.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Despite some of its more predictable twists, The Girl Before is riveting, even counterintuitive. Brühlmann, the director, takes material stuffed with clichés and gives it a subtler texture.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Sophie Gilbert
    Critiquing Pam & Tommy as a single, unified work is hard because it’s such an awkward hybrid of genres and ideas. ... I enjoyed this show. It made me think about Anderson differently—as someone who’s survived extraordinary victimization and typecasting and who’s managed to redefine how she’s perceived. But the series, which so often feels like it’s trying to atone for our old mistakes, seems intent on pointing out ethical transgressions while looking right past the notable void at its own core.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    The whole thing feels much too rote and timid for HBO—even if the costumes deliberately evoke modern sensibilities and wouldn’t be out of place on the ladies of And Just Like That, who are trying as resolutely to assert their relevance in a changing world as Agnes is. The mood is too saturnine, the occasional nods to social criticism too stilted.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    A ponderous, melancholic muddle whose primary motivation seems to be making amends for sins of the past. I watched it all without stopping, occasionally hiding my head in my hands.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Sophie Gilbert
    He still effuses charisma out of his pores, still reels viewers in with the lone hook of a skeptical eyebrow. He’s still brutally sarcastic. ... But the tone has changed. A panel discussion in the first episode, among veterans who say their lives and lungs have been scarred by burn pits, is urgent in a way that feels more suited to the nightly news than to comedy TV. ... The second episode, “Freedom,” is more emblematic of what the series could be. It’s a withering take on the American right’s response to the coronavirus pandemic that counters shouty talking points with acute logic.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    It’s a scattered, frivolous confrontation with history that neglects the more crucial parts of the Clinton impeachment. ... Even when the series does allude to larger elements within American politics, it does so with such an emphatic tone that the point itself is hard to take.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    About four episodes into the new season of Apple TV+’s The Morning Show, I stopped expecting it to have the qualities of a prestige television series—narrative complexity, emotional resonance, logic—and began simply appreciating it for what it is: one of the most batshit-expensive soap operas ever made. ... If you can meet The Morning Show on those terms, its second season is quite a ride. ... The Morning Show is camp: earnest, schlocky, nonsensical drama that’s not ruined by its excess and ridiculousness, but redeemed by it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Sophie Gilbert
    Within its tight frame, the series packs in more than shows three times its length. It’s particularly rewarding in its portrayal of Ji-Yoon’s personal life. ... What truly sells The Chair, though, is how fast and funny it is while throwing around a legion of informed ideas about a well-trodden subject.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    The series, as it cycles through satire, horror, and prestige psychodrama, can’t quite decide whether the wellness industry is a virulent scam or a desperately needed curative for broken souls. ... Nine Perfect Strangers connects only occasionally with its characters as human beings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Sophie Gilbert
    The White Lotus seems to fit within a spate of recent HBO shows about rich people rotting in their own toxic privilege—Succession, The Undoing, Big Little Lies—but it’s baggier than those shows while also being, in fleeting moments, more insightful.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Sophie Gilbert
    Apart from the setup, which implicates viewers more than anyone—the obsessive investment of a bunch of so-called grown-ups in the lives of beautiful young adults feels creepy at best—the new show is a carbon copy of the old one, only less white and less straight. ... The reboot rarely connects with its characters; instead, it seems to feel faintly sorry for these icons of doomed youth, as constrained by their self-presentation as they are.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Sophie Gilbert
    The genius of Hacks is how deftly it critiques decades of TV comedy, reminding viewers of what’s missing now (stars of Deborah’s wattage and grace) as much as what’s changed for the better.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    An ensemble series of monologues on the theme of loneliness that, rather than resonating in this particular time, feel stiff and flat.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Mare of Easttown is just a subtle, textured portrait of a place where some people are suffering, and a woman is doing her imperfect and insufficient best to help them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Sophie Gilbert
    AMC’s newest British crime drama is replete with violence, slathering on the carnage like so much frosting on a cake, but its excess is intentional and its pacing exquisite. ... I love it. I cannot get enough of this show. ... Gangs of London isn’t for the squeamish, but its baroquely complex universe can be a thrilling one to visit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    The overall style is part Adam McKay (who, incidentally, produced the series), part winking Daily Show segment, part Crazy Frog music video. ... Hoback asserts that QAnon is a role-playing game that’s somehow managed to bleed into reality, with all the awestruck marvel of a man who hasn’t personally suffered its consequences. After watching the series, you might conclude that it would be more meaningful, and more productive, to hear from someone who has.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Men in Kilts has a visceral appeal that’s distinct from its hosts, as delightfully squabbly and equipped with double entendres as they are. It offers, quite simply, an escape from others, without an escape from companionship.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Verbosity isn’t his forte (“Mmm, it’s very good” is his standard response to culinary excellence) so much as exquisite presentation and an understanding that he’s in on the joke.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Kay, an English writer who worked on the BBC America series Killing Eve, brings to Lupin some of his previous show’s impudent spirit, as well as a willingness to tweak its audience’s expectations.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    It tells instead of shows, maybe because its visuals are consumed with the stylistic tics of network procedurals: a saturated color palette, recurring images slowed down to a nightmarish crawl, exterior shots so gloomy, they’re almost Stygian. This is storytelling that feels the need to constantly regain its audience’s attention after each commercial break. More troubling, though, is the show’s tenuous conception of its central character.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    Dylan’s motives are impossible to fault: She tells the filmmakers that she wants to share her experiences again so that others who have endured what she has feel less alone. She deserves to get to do that, and if more exposure brings catharsis, then so be it. But the paradox is that in portraying events so selectively, Allen v. Farrow leaves too much room for yet another public wrangling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Lakshmi’s flirtatious manner, her unquenchable glamour, allow her to Trojan-horse Taste the Nation’s true intentions for viewers who might be expecting a vaguely patriotic travelogue through America’s most iconic meals. What she’s offering instead is one of the most fascinating food series to emerge in recent years: a ruthless indictment of how a nation’s cultural heritage has been constructed out of the people and traditions that it has consistently and brutally rejected.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    So much attention is paid to establishing Mason as a complicated and sufficiently pained male protagonist (and Rhys, to his credit, has a greater range with watchable mournfulness than anyone else on television) that the other elements of the story can get lost. ... The stylistic self-indulgence and narrative nebulousness are more of a shame because when Mason finally finds himself in court, all the pieces of the show fall into place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sophie Gilbert
    A writer less volcanically talented than Coel might struggle to weave one of these themes into a 12-part series; that she’s able to explore so many different layers of power while creating such a compulsively watchable show is striking.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Sophie Gilbert
    [Space Force] is so strange and ill-conceived and ill-timed that not even Carell’s avuncular bonhomie can save it. For all its cinematic trappings, Space Force is a series with a single joke running through it, and that joke is American idiocy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    There’s indisputable value in giving voice to people who were rendered voiceless for most of their adult lives, and in letting them explain how the systems that were supposed to protect them repeatedly failed. But Filthy Rich also suffers from a lack of clarity, hovering over its primary subject rather than targeting its punches. The series is eminently watchable, and enraging. But it comes no closer to unraveling Epstein than any previous reportorial attempts have managed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    The show rests on the chemistry between the two actors, and their ability to convey wordlessly what each character is thinking. On-screen, Edgar-Jones and Mescal generate so much intensity that any scene without the two of them almost feels like an affront. ... Their relationship is the force that sustains the story, not anything specific that might happen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Sophie Gilbert
    Mrs. America is maybe the first great television series of 2020, a project that manages to capture the complicated essence of real characters while telling a story at both micro and macro levels. ... It’s Schlafly, played as an elegant coil of wound ambition by Cate Blanchett, who turns Mrs. America from a starry historical miniseries into a stunning explainer on the poisoning of national politics.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    This is Maron’s moment to shine. The comedian, actor, podcast host, and oddly empathetic interviewer of people from Brad Pitt to Barack Obama is, for the chronically angsty, a surly priest of powerlessness. ... It’s consoling to watch Maron dismantle this particular moment in history so ruthlessly—refusing to allow for the possibility of absolution, but still crankily taking the turmeric anyway. Because in the end, you just don’t know.

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