Sophie Gilbert

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For 188 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sophie Gilbert's Scores

Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Mrs. America: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 Space Force: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 188
188 tv reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Mare of Easttown is just a subtle, textured portrait of a place where some people are suffering, and a woman is doing her imperfect and insufficient best to help them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Sophie Gilbert
    AMC’s newest British crime drama is replete with violence, slathering on the carnage like so much frosting on a cake, but its excess is intentional and its pacing exquisite. ... I love it. I cannot get enough of this show. ... Gangs of London isn’t for the squeamish, but its baroquely complex universe can be a thrilling one to visit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    The overall style is part Adam McKay (who, incidentally, produced the series), part winking Daily Show segment, part Crazy Frog music video. ... Hoback asserts that QAnon is a role-playing game that’s somehow managed to bleed into reality, with all the awestruck marvel of a man who hasn’t personally suffered its consequences. After watching the series, you might conclude that it would be more meaningful, and more productive, to hear from someone who has.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Men in Kilts has a visceral appeal that’s distinct from its hosts, as delightfully squabbly and equipped with double entendres as they are. It offers, quite simply, an escape from others, without an escape from companionship.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Verbosity isn’t his forte (“Mmm, it’s very good” is his standard response to culinary excellence) so much as exquisite presentation and an understanding that he’s in on the joke.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Kay, an English writer who worked on the BBC America series Killing Eve, brings to Lupin some of his previous show’s impudent spirit, as well as a willingness to tweak its audience’s expectations.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Sophie Gilbert
    It tells instead of shows, maybe because its visuals are consumed with the stylistic tics of network procedurals: a saturated color palette, recurring images slowed down to a nightmarish crawl, exterior shots so gloomy, they’re almost Stygian. This is storytelling that feels the need to constantly regain its audience’s attention after each commercial break. More troubling, though, is the show’s tenuous conception of its central character.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    Dylan’s motives are impossible to fault: She tells the filmmakers that she wants to share her experiences again so that others who have endured what she has feel less alone. She deserves to get to do that, and if more exposure brings catharsis, then so be it. But the paradox is that in portraying events so selectively, Allen v. Farrow leaves too much room for yet another public wrangling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    Lakshmi’s flirtatious manner, her unquenchable glamour, allow her to Trojan-horse Taste the Nation’s true intentions for viewers who might be expecting a vaguely patriotic travelogue through America’s most iconic meals. What she’s offering instead is one of the most fascinating food series to emerge in recent years: a ruthless indictment of how a nation’s cultural heritage has been constructed out of the people and traditions that it has consistently and brutally rejected.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    So much attention is paid to establishing Mason as a complicated and sufficiently pained male protagonist (and Rhys, to his credit, has a greater range with watchable mournfulness than anyone else on television) that the other elements of the story can get lost. ... The stylistic self-indulgence and narrative nebulousness are more of a shame because when Mason finally finds himself in court, all the pieces of the show fall into place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Sophie Gilbert
    A writer less volcanically talented than Coel might struggle to weave one of these themes into a 12-part series; that she’s able to explore so many different layers of power while creating such a compulsively watchable show is striking.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Sophie Gilbert
    [Space Force] is so strange and ill-conceived and ill-timed that not even Carell’s avuncular bonhomie can save it. For all its cinematic trappings, Space Force is a series with a single joke running through it, and that joke is American idiocy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    There’s indisputable value in giving voice to people who were rendered voiceless for most of their adult lives, and in letting them explain how the systems that were supposed to protect them repeatedly failed. But Filthy Rich also suffers from a lack of clarity, hovering over its primary subject rather than targeting its punches. The series is eminently watchable, and enraging. But it comes no closer to unraveling Epstein than any previous reportorial attempts have managed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    The show rests on the chemistry between the two actors, and their ability to convey wordlessly what each character is thinking. On-screen, Edgar-Jones and Mescal generate so much intensity that any scene without the two of them almost feels like an affront. ... Their relationship is the force that sustains the story, not anything specific that might happen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Sophie Gilbert
    Mrs. America is maybe the first great television series of 2020, a project that manages to capture the complicated essence of real characters while telling a story at both micro and macro levels. ... It’s Schlafly, played as an elegant coil of wound ambition by Cate Blanchett, who turns Mrs. America from a starry historical miniseries into a stunning explainer on the poisoning of national politics.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    This is Maron’s moment to shine. The comedian, actor, podcast host, and oddly empathetic interviewer of people from Brad Pitt to Barack Obama is, for the chronically angsty, a surly priest of powerlessness. ... It’s consoling to watch Maron dismantle this particular moment in history so ruthlessly—refusing to allow for the possibility of absolution, but still crankily taking the turmeric anyway. Because in the end, you just don’t know.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Sophie Gilbert
    Devs is immediately ponderous, alienating, and full of unintentionally funny details. ... Devs is only the latest in a series of puzzle-box shows more preoccupied with their own cleverness and their labyrinthine twists than with the burden of watchability. ... And the show’s aesthetic details—the score by Ben Salisbury and Portishead’s Geoff Barrow, the Kubrickian jumps and color-blocked portrait shots—feel so detached from the story that they’re often insufferable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Sophie Gilbert
    Determinism aside, this is a zanier, sillier Westworld, and much more entertaining for it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Sophie Gilbert
    Schlocky. ... Hunters is a strange show, all aestheticized violence and infantile philosophizing. ... What’s most maddening about Hunters is that much of it works in individual pieces, even though the whole is a sweaty, overseasoned smorgasbord.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    The popularity of easily digestible true-crime narratives has led to a glut of stories such as this one, ambitious and rote and unable to indulge in the skepticism or the soul-searching that subjects as consuming as the opioid epidemic merit.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    The three-hour-plus ceremony, the kickoff to awards season, was characterized by escapist highs and rude reality checks.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Sophie Gilbert
    Delightful escapism still has its place, but it usually comes within a tighter frame. More than ever in Season 3, Mrs. Maisel drags, or offers gags that are as uncomfortable and prolonged as a teeth cleaning.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    A character who, in Season 3, is becoming more and more unknowable. ... Colman, an indubitably brilliant actor, brings more of herself to the part than Foy did, but she’s able to capture the markedly divergent aspects of a woman who’s a wife, a mother, and a monarch in a long line of failures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Sophie Gilbert
    The series is the rare documentary excavation, though, where more distance would help. Everyone interviewed has some kind of profound connection with the case itself, when the more intriguing questions at this point involve the people who watched from the sidelines. ... The Preppy Murder offers just enough analysis to tease these kinds of deeper reckonings, but it’s ultimately up to viewers whether they choose to dig further.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Sophie Gilbert
    The first three episodes made available to critics are remarkably flat for such a lavish venture. ... When The Morning Show finally gets its setup established, and starts to grapple with the consequences and the meaning of what Mitch has actually done, the show finds some momentum. It’s at its most fascinating, and meaningful, when it’s picking at the cultural scar tissue left by so many allegations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Sophie Gilbert
    Mrs. Fletcher, though, is missing an opportunity to say something profound about people and the inconvenient discrepancies between what they want and what they need. The series benefits from two remarkably deft performers, who paint outside the lines of their characters. (All seven episodes are directed by women, including the veteran Nicole Holofcener and the performer and writer Carrie Brownstein.) But in the end, I wanted more—more insight, more illumination, more interrogation of the differences between sexual freedom and freedom itself.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Sophie Gilbert
    When Watchmen is at its most humane, its most imaginative (as it is in the sixth episode, “This Extraordinary Being”), it feels like superlative television. The breadth of its vision, coupled with Lindelof’s imperative to poke at the relationship between nostalgia for the past and destruction in the present, make for storytelling that vibrates with urgency and insight.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Sophie Gilbert
    As a primer on the nefarious influence of British tabloid journalism—a story that’s ever more timely and relevant—Press is entertaining. As a drama with A Point, it can veer toward cliché, with its sneering plutocrats and obvious sympathy for the Herald’s lofty ideals. But there’s something deeply satisfying in seeing how differently the sausage gets made, whether it’s 24-hour scandals about TV personalities or sober exposés about hospital budget cuts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Sophie Gilbert
    Payton’s story as a wealthy white teenager empowered by his own self-delusion is too familiar a tale to be so lightly drawn.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Sophie Gilbert
    I appreciate that The Deuce is telling this story, and that it encourages people to consider how the perpetual human urge to have or to watch others have sex is an ethical minefield. But I miss the way the show used to let us connect with its characters and the human frailty of their desires. They used to feel things; now they’re numb, parts of a storytelling engine that is running its way toward an important, but impassive, end.

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