Stephanie Merry

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For 327 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Merry's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Look of Silence
Lowest review score: 0 A Haunted House 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 71 out of 327
327 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 37 Stephanie Merry
    Flower can’t quite nail the necessary tone, aiming for dark, but missing the comedy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 37 Stephanie Merry
    Norwegian director Roar Uthaug has had past success with nail-biting suspense, as in his well-received 2015 disaster movie “The Wave.” He can’t quite replicate that same tension here, however. Watching a tiny-but-tough woman survive one danger after another tests not only our credulity, but our patience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Merry
    What was a steamy battle of wits in the novel looks more like a chemistry-free charade onscreen. Instead of character development the audience gets torture galore, whether it’s Dominika being doused with freezing water while naked and tied to a chair or a particularly sadistic character flaying someone alive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    Like a real-life game night, the comedy may not leave a lasting impression, but it’s plenty of fun while it lasts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    In the grand scheme of movies for kids, the stop-motion comedy is hardly a stinker. But it’s also less fun and inventive than you’d expect, given the company’s stellar, Oscar-winning track record.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    The performances remain subtly powerful, especially Karam’s. Tony is a man whose unpredictable rage can be sparked by one wrong move, but Karam infuses the character with pathos through the subtlest gestures and facial expressions. El Basha, who is also moving in his role, was the first Palestinian to win best actor at the Venice Film Festival.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 37 Stephanie Merry
    The romantic drama is painfully contrived and insistently predictable.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Stephanie Merry
    A charmer from its first action-packed frames to its over-the-top jailhouse-musical scene during the end credits.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    Don’t overthink it, in other words. All “Showman” asks of you is that you give yourself over to the holiday-cheer machine, if you can. Like the circus, it’s an experience that’s been engineered for this precise moment in time, and not one minute longer.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    The movie still holds power, mostly thanks to Leuenberger’s arresting, self-contained performance as Nora. She plays the character as an enigma, the last person you’d expect to lead a cause.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    Not only is it a wholly original story, but it also honors a culture that’s so often overlooked by the movie industry. That alone might have made it a hit, but Coco has so much more to offer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    Wonder does occasionally suffer from kid-movie pitfalls, straining to be cute or mining humor from ridiculously precocious little ones. But mostly it succeeds in telling not one complicated story, but many, and giving the experience of being a confused or lonely or scared youngster the space it deserves.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    “Murder” may lack urgency, but it does have style. The sets, the costumes and the vistas are stunning.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Merry
    A good idea and a stellar cast lost inside a sloppy script that mostly retreads last year’s laughs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    For all the story’s cosmic echoes across the ages, the pacing just feels off. Still, the approach is inventive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Stephanie Merry
    The acting ensemble has a believable, brotherly chemistry, especially Teller and Taylor Kitsch, playing a troublemaker who initially teases Brendan brutally before the two warm up to each other, forming an adorable bond.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    Visually, it’s spectacular. Conceptually, it’s jaw-dropping to simply considering the effort that went into this. The story, however, doesn’t always hold its own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    What starts out trivial gradually turns into a drama about big ideas: mortality and the meaning of life; the value of relationships and the vulnerability they require.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    Stronger isn’t always easy to watch; Jeff makes bad decisions and life gets messy. But it does feel like a realistic depiction of one man’s life.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    “Kingsman” is essentially a live-action cartoon, one that aims for an audible reaction and little else. That may not be the world’s loftiest goal, but whether it results in a gagging eww or a chuckle, it’s a plan that usually succeeds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    In the end, Viceroy’s House works, but mainly as a historical refresher on the 70th anniversary of Indian independence. As drama, it’s a reminder that truth is sometimes more affecting than fiction.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Merry
    The story often feels like a collection of (so-so) jokes, forcibly strung together in a tenuous narrative.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    The uneven tone especially undermines the ending — one that’s as tragic as it is predictable. Viewers may expect — even crave — to feel an emotional impact, but the movie hasn’t laid the groundwork.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Stephanie Merry
    The drama is a realistic and methodical meditation on family obligation, personal sacrifice and — of course — the power of architecture. That makes Columbus as lovely to look at as it is to ponder.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    The movie often undercuts itself by spelling things out rather than hinting at them, belaboring emotions and ideas to ensure that the audience understands what the characters are feeling and thinking.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    “Brigsby” never ventures into the caustic simply for the sake of comedy. These days, that’s refreshing. There aren’t many movies that value sweetness over cynicism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    Girls Trip accomplishes exactly what it sets out to do: shock and amuse. Along the way, it reminds us how important old friends can be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Stephanie Merry
    The story it tells is conventional, chronological and straightforward. And that’s enough. With a story this charming, who needs bells and whistles?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Merry
    Every element of the movie feels fabricated, from the stilted conversation to the ­all-too-convenient obstacles the movie keeps throwing in the path of progress.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Stephanie Merry
    For all its late-in-the-game silliness, The Exception is a solidly acted, well-told tale about how love of country holds up in the face of other, less nationalistic passions.

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