Stephen Dalton

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For 150 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Dalton's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 90 I Am Not a Witch
Lowest review score: 20 Mortdecai
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 68 out of 150
  2. Negative: 12 out of 150
150 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    Quincy is an unapologetically partisan insider's portrait. The material is rich and the cast list starry, but the overall package veers a little too close to gushing vanity project in places.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The splatter violence is fairly tame by modern gore standards, and the episodic narrative sags in places, but the ecological subtext and feminist folk-horror elements make this almost entirely female-driven road movie an agreeably fresh addition to the zombie canon.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Dalton
    Dolan has labored hard to yoke together these tricksy, time-jumping, intertwined plots, reportedly editing down a mountain of material over two years. In the process, a whole character played by Jessica Chastain was surgically removed. But however long he tinkered, Dolan has not quite salvaged a story whose default setting seems to be mirthless, ponderous navel-gazing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Dalton
    Crucially, like its predecessor, Gloria Bell maintains a warm but rigorously unsentimental tone despite material which could easily lend itself to mawkish sentimentality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Dalton
    Corbet's high-caliber melodrama combines food for thought with sense-blitzing spectacle. Between screaming tantrums and booming anthems, it leaves us with a nagging sense that history never quite repeats itself, but sometimes rhymes. Usually to a thumping disco beat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    The intent is noble and the attention to detail admirable, but the overall effect is obstinately unmoving.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Dalton
    A fable-like story about a young African girl banished from her village for alleged witchcraft, it blends deadpan humor with light surrealism, vivid visuals and left-field musical choices.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    Unashamedly formulaic and relentlessly puerile, The Festival is no better than it needs to be, which may be as much commercial calculation as artistic limitation.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Stephen Dalton
    With an ineptitude so thorough it borders on genius, Cummings achieves the rare feat of making Sheeran appear even more boring in person than he is on record.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    Sadly, Berk’s stale screenplay simply lacks the heft or depth to lift it above third-hand homage to earlier, better, smarter films.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    The screenplay to The World Is Yours is sporadically hilarious though rarely subtle, relying a little too heavily on boorish stereotypes and slapstick violence for its broad humor.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    As an experiment in collaborative, exploratory docudrama, The Dead and the Others is an admirably committed enterprise. Sadly, as a cinematic experience, it is flat and functional.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    As a timely yarn about the mistreatment of minorities, both in Sweden and worldwide, Border is rich in allegorical layers. But as a thriller at least partially rooted in supernatural genre conventions, its relentlessly dour Nordic glumness drags a little. Social realism and magical realism make uneasy bedfellows.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    A banal and patronizing cautionary sermon for lovestruck ladies torn between heart and head, sexy-dangerous bad boys and dependably dull husband types.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    While Angel brings little new to the lexicon of serial killer biopics, it hits the target as an effortlessly palatable aesthetic experience, more shiny period pageant than probing character study.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    The premise is smart, the ingredients classy and the overall look stylish. But Niccol’s paranoid anxieties about the totalitarian dangers of cyberspace feel oddly glib and dated, light on thrills or narrative logic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    The Endless is not just about latent power struggles within cults but also within families, and about how both are eclipsed by more ancient, malevolent cosmic forces.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    British director Sophie Fiennes certainly finds Jones a spellbinding subject in Bloodlight and Bami, securing intimate access to the veteran diva over several years without ever quite managing to spill her secrets.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Ghost Stories is a witty and well-crafted love letter to old-school horror tropes.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Dalton
    Mirren always brings a touch of class, of course, even to deluxe schlock like this. But Clarke is something of a blank leading man while the secondary characters are mostly pale phantoms sleepwalking through a thinly drawn plot.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Dalton
    Any meager pleasures that Lies We Tell offers are purely technical.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Dalton
    Somewhere in the murky depths of this modestly gripping thriller lurks a more interesting film about real-life monsters, the kind that prey on human minds not human flesh.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Clearly weighted towards Gitai's own liberal political stance, but incorporating a range of other views too, West of the Jordan River is a dry and sometimes depressing film, but informative and humane too.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    Sheikh Jackson is a little too somber and straight-faced for its goofy premise, its protagonists often unsympathetic, its tone sometimes corny and melodramatic. But it is also an offbeat charmer that boldly sets up its bizarre conceit and runs with it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    Collins has crafted a mesmerizing modernist memorial to ancient Celtic traditions, even if its determinedly slow pace and diffuse narrative will likely leave some viewers unsatisfied.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    For all its high-caliber talent mix, The Snowman is a largely pedestrian affair, turgid and humorless in tone. The cast share zero screen chemistry, much of the dialogue feels like a clunky first draft and the wearily familiar plot is clogged with clumsy loose ends.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Dalton
    ever Here wears the outer clothes of a crime thriller to cloak a more haunting, disturbing, open-ended rumination on voyeurism and identity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Dalton
    Breathe is clearly aiming for the same heart-wrenching emotional heights as James Marsh’s Oscar-winning Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything. But this is very much a crude copy, its noble intentions hobbled by a trite script, flat characters and a relentlessly saccharine tone that eventually starts to grate.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Dalton
    The gory carnage is sparingly but vividly staged, the suspense-driven plot twisty enough to tax the brain.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Dalton
    Untaxing as drama, thin as entertainment, but modestly enjoyable as a revved-up caper movie, Overdrive is pure escapist fluff with a light French accent. Which still makes it smarter, leaner and cooler than any of the Fast and the Furious films it shamelessly mimics.

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