Stephen Farber

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For 159 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Farber's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Attack
Lowest review score: 30 Frank & Ava
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 88 out of 159
  2. Negative: 5 out of 159
159 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    Hodge’s performance is what keeps Brian Banks on track. He is powerful in scenes of anger, but he may be even better in purely silent moments where his unspoken reactions are eloquent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    A rich reminiscence of a gifted actor who died far too young.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    An impressive film ... Alternately disturbing and inspiring, it manages to capture the diversity of America in a tight 73 minutes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    Herzog’s film may not be the final word on Gorbachev, but it is affectionate and candid and leaves audiences in a melancholy mood about the sometimes short-lived nature of reform.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    Both Metz and Lucas are solid enough, but their fairly stock characters do not emerge quite as vividly as they might have. On the other hand, Topher Grace is extremely engaging as the hip, rap music-loving pastor who initially rubs Joyce the wrong way but eventually wins her over in a plot development that is not exactly brimming with surprise.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    Aside from the provocative premise, The Wall of Mexico has a few other points to recommend it, though it can’t be considered a complete success. Directors Magdalena Zyzak and Zachary Cotler, working from a screenplay by Cotler, have made some miscalculations that undermine what could have been a powerful exposé of present-day xenophobia.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    South Mountain transcends the limitations of some nakedly personal films to offer an affecting vision of frayed family ties.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    It is Monaghan who keeps the movie on track, capturing Judy’s fire along with her sometimes aggravating tenacity. This honest actress is incapable of idealizing the characters she plays, and her modest, energetic performance makes Saint Judy — which might have been a dry textbook lesson — engaging and moving.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    A fascinating if ultimately failed exercise in histrionics and social commentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    The filmmakers never underline the emotions they want to evoke, and yet by the end, audiences may be moved to tears by this tale of fractured lives that find just the right measure of repair.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    The film is heartfelt and often powerful, but sometimes too sluggish to carry maximum impact.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Farber
    The film has significant problems in the writing and direction, but the first challenge lies in the casting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    Tapping cleverly into one of the newest perils in urban living, Ride will please most audiences looking for a Friday-night thrill ride.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    The film benefits from the fine cast and from many sharp and poignant moments. It's an impressive achievement technically as well.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Farber
    Stern's melancholy on election night in 2016 is genuinely affecting, but despite some incisive footage en route to the depressing conclusion, the film ultimately leaves us feeling that the director has become a little too close to his subjects to probe as deeply as our national chaos requires
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    The film would not have the same impact without the commanding lead performance. Thanks to Ramos’s affecting work, Fistful of Dirt sticks in the memory.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Farber
    Despite impressive performances by Matthew McConaughey and newcomer Richie Merritt, the film fails to engage or enlighten.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    McCarthy’s performance, which is paired with an equally rewarding turn by British actor Richard E. Grant, anchors this bizarre, compelling true story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Farber
    It deserves praise not as a polemic but as a richly humanistic, emotionally searing drama that sticks in the memory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    The film never quite clarifies its own attitude toward Hart. It simply doesn’t spend enough time with him to allow the audience to decide whether he was a truly transformative politician undone by tabloid reporters or just another slick operator. This robs the film of a tragic dimension that it might have achieved.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    The main virtue of the film lies in the thoughtful interviews given by the Israeli and Palestinian negotiators, both the accompanying voiceover commentaries and their later on-camera appearances.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    Beyond celebrating the music, 40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie has something to say about the compromises and reconciliations that are a part of aging, and it turns out to make for a stirring and healing reunion.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    Vreeland’s willingness to include painful as well as flattering details is what gives Love, Cecil its punch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    The film fails to provide many practical solutions to the problems it identifies. Still, it’s an effective piece of agitprop suffused with sadness over the decline of a rich part of the American heritage.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    The resolution seems honest and mature, and a brief epilogue is so powerful that it makes us forget some of the film’s earlier lapses. The emotionally devastating last line socks the whole movie home.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Farber
    The film is overlong and wildly uneven (just as it was two years ago), but it benefits from a strong cast making the most of some sharp moments exposing the underside of male privilege and domination.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Farber
    It is a pleasure to watch the present-day Francis interact with people all over the world and articulate his hopes for improving the lot of the poor. The film is humane and unobjectionable, but in the end, it isn’t pointed enough to seize the attention of skeptics in the audience.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    Set in Rhode Island, the film focuses on three boys who have had a parent in prison (one of those parents is a mother), and it probes the impact on the children with clarity and poignancy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Farber
    The doc—which is sure to stir conversation as well as emotion when it screens at other festivals—will open audience’s eyes to larger problems of child abuse and exploitation that pervade too many countries around the globe.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Farber
    The film honors the hard-working, often unacknowledged craftsmen in the film industry and stirs provocative questions about the fine line between legitimate devotion to an artist and dangerous hero worship.

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