Stephen Whitty

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For 200 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephen Whitty 's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Manchester by the Sea
Lowest review score: 0 Misconduct
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 95 out of 200
  2. Negative: 30 out of 200
200 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Whitty
    A warm gathering of Scandinavian artists, with Sweden’s Skarsgård and Norway’s Hovig both excelling under Norwegian director Maria Sødahl’s attentive care.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Whitty
    Rather than including people with their politics, the filmmakers depend on flashy sleight-of-hand, distracting us with a deceptive narrative trick that isn’t nearly as fresh as they think.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Whitty
    As a brief, brightly-coloured, virtual babysitter – lasting just long enough to keep the children diverted while you check in and out of that last Zoom meeting, and get dinner on the table – it dutifully fulfills its obligations. But anyone looking for much beyond that in this tale of a flying squirrel – well, they’d have to be nuts.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Whitty
    Even for a film about time loops, everything feels overly familiar. (Note to filmmakers: Simply referencing the film you’re stealing from doesn’t excuse the theft). And unlike Mark and Margaret’s do-over day, in the end the whole thing slips by without leaving any impression at all.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Stephen Whitty
    Despite the constant effort and genuine warmth of star Melissa McCarthy, the film’s stitched-together stories come apart early on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Evan Morgan’s sometimes weird, sometimes whimsical thriller delivers a grown-up blend of film-noir tropes and deadpan humor, for a comedy-drama which starts off lighthearted and then deftly darkens.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Spun mostly of sugar and air, this film is a lightweight, but mostly sweet, treat – and a lovely reminder of when pictures could just be low-key amusements, and the pandemic hadn’t yet turned cities into ghost towns.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    In a way, the film is its own genre – the found-footage documentary. There are no interviews with other people, no self-described experts. Just Hoon, who – adding to the film’s melancholy sense of waste – comes across as an unspoiled, charismatic and mostly amiable young man.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Whitty
    Although the story’s point is clear, the plotting is thin, and it can be easy at times for viewers to feel as confined as the prisoners. But the production design – all grey cement walls, with that platform cutting through the center of the screen like an infernal dumbwaiter – is superb.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Its quiet humanism and painstaking attention to detail are sure to appeal to the core audience which has faithfully followed her for more than a decade.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Built on a potent mixture of quiet bravery and hard-won access, David France’s new documentary, Welcome to Chechnya, puts audiences in the middle of the literally life-or-death struggle of an already endangered minority.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    The Painter and the Thief suggests, human relationships are complex and multidimensional things. And whenever you foolishly start to try to contain them in a simple frame, they stubbornly burst out.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Whitty
    Instead of intriguing ambiguity, this updated version – which had a long and bumpy development – offers only maddening confusion...With false endings within false endings, it’s the sort of movie whose final fade-out will leave audiences groaning in frustration.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Lit like a Rembrandt, acted like a neo-Realist classic and with all the searing social conscience of a new Dardenne brothers film, Vitalina Varela is both richly familiar and profoundly unique; if occasionally a challenge to watch.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Stephen Whitty
    Badly cast, broadly directed, and hampered by a book that hasn’t aged well since the musical’s 1981 West End debut, it’s hard to imagine just who this film’s target audience is.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Stephen Whitty
    The Irishman is vintage Scorsese, with an often sinuously moving camera, occasional break-the-fourth-wall monologues, wicked wise-guy humour, and explosions of sudden tenderness and casual violence. And its final half-hour pulls something even deeper from the filmmaker – moments of reflection, twinges of regret, worries about chances thrown away.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    An artful, deeply felt documentary, Always in Season has its own, sadly necessary reasons for being.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    Like the sequinned, simpering erotic dancers it spotlights, Hustlers is a lot smarter than it initially looks. Given a story about a gang of larcenous strippers, audiences might expect little more than dirty jokes and steamy sex. But this slyly feminist movie pushes empowerment, too; it’s a film about being in control, not losing it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Whitty
    The result is a careful chronicle that, while staying true to its observational ethos, nonetheless, leaves plenty of questions – and, occasionally, its audience – behind.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Whitty
    Ma
    The script takes forever to get started, and once it’s going, labours to create a single plausible character. Nor can Taylor, who last handled the dreary The Girl On The Train, wring any suspense from his scenes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Whitty
    Like the first film, The Secret Life of Pets 2 is at its best when it concentrates on the unconditional love offered by mankind’s best friends, or gently mocks familiar situations.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Whitty
    Revenge may be a dish best served cold, but Domino dishes it up as a sloppy mess of warmed-over clichés. Instead of his old high style and kinky violence, director Brian De Palma delivers only crude thrills and ugly stereotypes, a soggy bag of junk-food snacks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    17 Blocks ... is packed with gritty realism, and at times its uncensored honesty almost makes you want to look away.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Carefully made and perfectly acted.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    It takes more than simply celebrating rural life and marveling at nature to make someone the next David Gordon Green, let alone the next Terrence Malick. While Yeomans inarguably finds something significant in the slow pace of small towns, the power of narration and the jolt of handheld cinematography, exactly what that is isn’t always clear. In fact, sometimes it’s literally unclear; shots slip out of focus, and some close-ups are so poorly lit the characters’ features disappear.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephen Whitty
    At its core, The Kill Team has one great performance, and some important things to say – about the dangerous appeal of the strong, and the easy malleability of the young. It’s well worth watching, and thinking on. It’s just a shame that that great performance isn’t matched by all the others – and that what the film has to say is said in such a dutifully by-the-book way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    This is a small, carefully crafted film that tries hard to pierce the protective armor of a recluse known to be difficult and domineering. In the end, Stokes still remains slightly unknowable, as she’d undoubtedly prefer. Yet the documentary’s deep dive into her extraordinary archives, and the grainy video treasures it unearths, make for fascinating viewing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Stephen Whitty
    Come to Daddy starts out like a nasty drama, ends up as a gruesomely gory, coldly comic revenge thriller – and desperately loses its way somewhere in-between.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Stephen Whitty
    With authentic spaces like this around them, Ahn’s actors relax into the realism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Stephen Whitty
    Watergate is a fascinating film that both draws disturbing parallels and offers the opposition encouragement.

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