For 411 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Davis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Moonlight
Lowest review score: 0 Glitter
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 90 out of 411
411 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    The movie is like an old honky-tonk song, a little sentimental but full of heart. It torches and twangs without getting too hokey.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    As the whimsical setup in Yesterday deteriorates until its unimaginative conclusion, the familiar Lennon/McCartney collaborations (along with a couple written by Harrison) provide the only solace, timeless songs that make it better. Viva Los Beatles!
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    This love letter dedicated to opera’s biggest rock star, the larger-than-life Luciano Pavarotti, achieves something most documentaries about the deceased rarely do: It brings a man back to glorious life.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Times sure have changed since the old Shaft made women swoon by simply treating them like sh*t. As for the new Shaft, is he still a bad mutha? Shut your mouth.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Perhaps the bigger canvas here is a native daughter’s tribute to the resiliency of the people of her homeland. It’s no coincidence that the mascot chicken in this rustic Utopia is named Survive.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    As in the Mercury biopic, an unexpected performance by a relatively untried actor in the central role anchors Rocketman.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    The movie remains patchy as it continues to jump somewhat arbitrarily from day to day without fully realizing its subject matter. The one dependable constant in all of this is Christo himself. Smiling ecstatically one minute, despondently hangdog the next, he exhibits a genius lunacy on par with his life’s work.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    It’s a tale full of sound and fury, signifying something that’s nothing less than appalling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    While the tone of Rafiki is simple and direct, director Kahiu demonstrates a delicate touch when she enhances Kena and Ziki’s early euphoric attraction to one another through a subtle shift in the otherwise vibrant cinematography by Christopher Wessels.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Satan & Adam eschews ebony-and-ivory banality to depict a friendship that refuses to be tinted in black and white.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    For a movie focusing so intently on personal faith, it doesn’t much trust your independent capacity to find religious, spiritual, or other meaning in what is truly an amazing story.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Perhaps the fault lies not in our stars, but in our shameless need for a sappy ending.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Screenwriters Nina Fiore and John Herrera have modernized Keene’s decades-old storyline without completely chucking the quaint qualities of the original.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    You could fault A Madea Family Funeral for its many other shortcomings. It runs about 30 minutes too long; the tempo of the numerous dramatic scenes is on par with drying paint; characters lack consistency from scene to scene; the dialogue sounds like a first draft that needs major editing; its occasional technical sloppiness; and so forth.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    The real delight here, however, is Broderick’s mensch, a middle-aged man painfully aware that he’s become a loser.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Henson aside, the most memorable performance comes from musician Erykah Badu in the smallish role of a trippy, weed-dealing psychic seemingly from another planet.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    The movie’s constant meta-comedy recognition of the endearing yet aggravating earworm quality of the first film’s “Everything Is Awesome” theme song may be its most effectual in-joke.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Some kids may find the whole affair traumatic, particularly when the poor pooch finds herself dehydrated and chained to a corpse in the wilderness. Then again, that’s nothing compared to those same kids’ parents’ recollection of a Disney flick in which a tearful boy must shoot his rabies-inflicted yeller dog in the end. Bless the beasts and the children.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Speaking in a barely audible rasp bordering on monotone, Kidman bravely submerges herself in a performance with some genuinely harrowing emotional moments, and yet the unswerving conviction she brings to the role is conspicuous.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    For no matter how derivative this carefully calculated sentimental journey may be, there’s still an undeniable magic in its voice and its step likely to enchant adults – and hopefully kids – alike. Uncle Walt would be proud.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    In the end, Tea With the Dames peters out as a conversation, given there’s no real beginning, middle or end to the film. It’s a privilege, however, to have been given a tableside seat to listen to this foursome reminisce and ruminate for an hour and a half, with laughter punctuating the conversation every few minutes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    While the movie principally focuses on Flynn’s professional aspirations, including his desire to be accepted as a chef in his own right despite his age (the online trolls had a field day after the NYT article), a prickly relationship with his mother, Meg, provides a subtextual narrative that sometimes feels a bit uncomfortable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    The casting is solid, with an even more pumped-up Jordan once again anchoring the movie as the conflicted young boxer in the title. But it’s the underdeveloped villains of the piece who ultimately prove more intriguing, despite their one-dimensionality.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    In the end, you feel like you’re the victim of a cruel bait-and-switch, lured into thinking Nobody’s Fool would be a crappy but nevertheless entertaining Tiffany Haddish movie, only to have it turn out to be a crappy but nevertheless crappy Tyler Perry movie. Talk about mixed feelings.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    Grant punctuates almost every piece of Hock’s dialogue with an absurd gesture or facial expression – the theatricality of his portrayal of this not-so-street-smart bullshit artist is fascinating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Most important, there are the photographs themselves – lots of them – which director Freyer freely uses to illustrate Winogrand’s genius in capturing the ambiguous now, urging the viewer to fill in the details of the story glimpsed in the shot.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Even the documentary crew, composed of seasoned climbers and longtime friends, can barely watch their buddy painstakingly move up the peak.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    The beauty of Redford’s rock-steady performances over the last six decades or so is that he never showed off, and yet always commanded your attention.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    A serviceable cast of unfamiliar actors (the exception: Thompson as the family matriarch, Marmee); a serviceable script that takes few if any chances, with occasional wordless montages of shiny happy people; and serviceable direction that gets the job done and nothing more.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Don’t expect any hokey scare tactics here. Under the steady hand of Oscar-nominated director Abrahamson (Room), the film is a calculated slow burn, one that plays a cunning head game with those viewers willing to be entranced.

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