For 113 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 10% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Greene's Scores

Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 The Good Place: Season 2
Lowest review score: 42 Life Sentence: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 97 out of 113
  2. Negative: 0 out of 113
113 tv reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    For a show with an occasionally impressive exterior (the interplay between Klaus and Ben gets an impressive-looking added wrinkle), the emotional heartbeat underneath is largely absent. Part of that comes from being stretched thin enough that characters without a well-established core are often left flailing, but it’s mostly due to the show’s continued affinity for the reset button.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    There’s an element in this season of “Frayed” getting all its pieces in place. The closing moments of the finale feel like both the logical culmination of episodes’ worth of careful buildup and a gateway to an exciting chapter if the story continues. If it follows the steady path it’s already plotted out, “Frayed” has all the makings of something really special.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Last Chance U” finds success in taking its cues from the people in frame. Rather than try to graft on a predetermined narrative, directors Whiteley and Daniel McDonald, along with DP Terry Zumalt, try to take in a season that’s not sensational and that can move at the players’ pace.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The anxiety that marks the show is here channeled toward embracing the way weirdness and stupidity seem to blanket the realities of corporate life. In finding new ways to torque these office mainstays, “Corporate” has given the rest of the Hampton DeVille team plenty of ways to transform some of that simmering rage of previous seasons into a kind of office-centered goofiness. Lance Reddick remains an episode-to-episode comedic powderkeg.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    “Hanna” finds space in Season 2 for a flurry of fantastic performances that fill out the murky, grey area surrounding Hanna herself. Where the show used to feel like two blunt objects rammed together in different cities around Europe, this season is a more artful balancing act.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Even with all that uncertainty, “Dark” has maintained that highwire act for three of the most thrilling sci-fi TV seasons ever made. To see it make it across the chasm with its ambitions and technique intact is certainly something worth remembering.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Though this special still has more jokes per minute than just about any other show on TV, one tradeoff of this doubled runtime is that there aren’t quite as many blink-and-you-miss-it gags as in the regular episodes. But the core idea of having jokes in as many forms as possible still holds. Salahuddin is still a pro at delivering a punchline under his breath. ... If this “Black History Month Spectacular” proves anything, it’s that this is a show with both a timelessness and specificity to thrive in any era.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    With so much of the tonal groundwork taken care of by that first episode, each new attempt to go back to that well gets less and less shocking. ... Yet, even when those people around Patrick seem thin, it’s the voice work on the show that becomes another saving grace.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The show isn’t as comprehensive in its scope as it might be intending at points, but there’s still plenty of fertile storytelling ground where it does focus its attention.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    It takes all the messiness of affection and heartache and loss and instead of affording it to a central couple dealing with someone on the outside, it treats these three characters as partners each worthy of attention in their own way. Like any good relationship, it’s hard work. But there’s enough communication between characters (and between the storyteller and audience) to build something special.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Where most historical fiction seems like it’s arcing toward some grand thesis statement of a fixed point in time, “Barkskins” is just as much about foreshadowing the problems of the resulting generations as it is capturing a bygone moment. It might not always lead to the tidiest, easy-to-wrangle storytelling, but it ends up reflecting its time and our current one in a way these kinds of shows are not always able.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    This is a show that rarely takes its time. Watching things escalate from tiny misunderstandings to disasters threatening to destroy a city or reconstitute the fabric of timespace is this show’s sweet spot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    “Upload” feels like a spiritual tug-of-war between a handful of thinly sketched starting points that never coalesce into anything significant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The first four episodes of this opening season definitely have their charms — Jason’s meet-up with an ex to try to heal some open emotional wounds has some unexpected push-pull moments — the back half is really where “Trying” settles into a groove.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Most comedy specials arrive fully formed. “Middleditch & Schwartz” gives you the joy of working things out together.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “The Last Dance” isn’t necessarily an evidence-gathering operation, but as the series goes on, the input from teammates, coaches, and members of the Jordan inner circle all seem to ask whether the outcome of June 1998 was worth all the turmoil. For many viewers lifted by the way “The Last Dance” captures the sweep of history, the likely answer will be “yes.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Even when the plot machinations later in the season grow exponentially more designed for maximum stakes, there’s still enough goodwill built up in the show’s opening chapters to see how the crew sees their way past a mounting list of obstacles.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    The result is a straightforward, few-frills retelling of the web of conversations that ensnared Dawkins and led to the charging of a number of his regular collaborators from inside college teams and apparel companies alike.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Season 4 finds the ideal line between evoking both the debauchery of his past and squaring one man’s outsized legend with his more understanding current form.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    “Dirty Money” episodes tend to function as cleanly produced explainers, recounting chapters from the recent past while nodding to their ramifications in the present. Whenever the show has an opportunity to roust itself from the more clinical on-camera interviews and chart firsthand some of these aftereffects, there’s a sharper final product.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The most valuable part of “Cosmos: Possible Worlds” is its merging of boundless optimism and the necessity of urgency.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    Fluffy and safe, it’s not the strongest endorsement of what the rest of the series might bring. (At the time of this writing, no additional episodes were made available to press.)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    The main issue is that so much of what the show presents of them are their surface-level emotions, not the characters themselves. By Episodes 4 and 5, the selectively hidden parts of not just Paul and Ally’s relationship but their past individual histories do float to the surface. The question is if audiences will stick around long enough for those breadcrumbs to guide their way out of the cold.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    As the show’s emotional swings match Syd’s various states, Lillis provides the necessary bridge between them. ... In the rare moments when Syd, Dina, and Stan get the chance to operate as a group, there’s a glimmer of what the show could be if it moves beyond these first seven chapters. Even when they’re split apart, “I Am Not Okay With This” exists in a comfortable cross-section of pace and scope that gives Syd’s story the breathing room it needs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    “Babies” is akin to watching a documentary about falling in love that spotlights couples but also leans primarily on the testimony of dating app experts. There’s a story to tell there, but the priorities seem skewed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The show’s best energy and ability to subvert expectations of a show set in this time and place is evident right from the pilot. Even still, there’s a sense that this series’ best moments could still be ahead of it. ... What’s on offer right now from “Year of the Rabbit” is a chance to see some very gifted performers add a goofy curveball to the London of centuries past.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Viewers expecting a tight, compact album might be pleasantly surprised to see this season take on a more open-ended Spotify playlist feel, designed to keep playing and be enjoyed knowing that the end is still far in the future. At times, it’s an eclectic mix of ideas and execution, but there’s a great amount of satisfaction in just letting it all wash over you.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    These new episodes show how both the construction of the character and Pullman’s performance are a foundation worth building on again and again.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Aside from a few orienting establishing shots here and there, many of these episodes commit so fully to this alien approach that it’s a legitimate surprise to be snapped back to reality when more traditional looks at various creatures start to sneak through. ... It scratches the human need to be reminded that there is more left to discover, that there are still some quasi-mystical elements of nature that science has barely had a chance to observe, much less explain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Everything’s Gonna Be Okay” has an infectious, energetic momentum to it. ... There’s enough of a sturdy foundation of what this family is to each other that seeing them take turns as the show’s driving force gives the series some well-deserved wonder.

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