For 148 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 10% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Greene's Scores

Average review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 American Vandal: Season 1
Lowest review score: 42 Life Sentence: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 148
148 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Everything’s Gonna Be Okay” is a perfect balancing act. There’s comfort without feeling too glib. There’s introspection without becoming too self-serious. There’s true affection without losing the tension that comes with being that close to someone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    One of the local reporters who’s been on the Gardner case beat since the beginning says that it’s been “30 years that these masterpieces have been missing. It needs a break.” “This is a Robbery” does a decent job at laying out what’s happened over those three decades — it also does a lot to prove that statement right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The added time and the measured work from the show’s core cast help to show the full psychological toll it takes to both evade justice and to attempt to see it delivered.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    There’s the sleekness and attention to detail of “Abstract: The Art of Design” without the need or pull to burnish the subject’s credentials. It has the biographical specificity and care of “Song Exploder” while taking advantage of the fact that it’s capturing ideas that are already visual.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    So while there’s plenty of shifting around in “Back” Season 2, the humor comes from the same place: melancholy resignation to the fact that something will always be (fittingly, in the words of the new network’s slogan) slightly off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    As inventive as “Solar Opposites” is in spurts, Season 2 shows how much the main four characters are relatively indistinguishable from each other. ... The main exception is Jesse (Mary Mack), who emerges as the main Season 2 bright spot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    The further the season goes on, the more it sheds its procedural strengths and leans toward a more overarching story that gobbles up some of the potential to get to know its main characters better. ... Still, the pieces put in place over the course of these eight episodes provide a sturdy foundation for more exploring.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Each of the opening three episodes conclude with their own little grace notes, neat bows on a new development that, again, in a multitude of other contexts would come across as treacly. By fully embracing the strengths of the show and its franchise predecessors, “Mighty Ducks: Game Changers” has already earned those moments with breakaway speed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    If there’s one “Final Space” weakness, it’s that these early stretches take a few episodes to truly settle in to whatever the heart of the season turns out to be. But once that switch flips, it’s always a treat to see what this show manages to unleash. It’s weird and wonderful and not hemmed in by an overly referential charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The middle stretch of the season lags a bit in parts when the big-picture ideas don’t exactly line up with these individual, isolated incidents. When the built-in advantage of a show is the necessity for conciseness, those chapters don’t necessarily drag down the show’s overall potency. But when “Calls” is locked in, it’s an especially effective slice of horror. That usually comes when the show sticks to the “less is more” side of things.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    It’s surprising to see how much “Staged” Season 2 is a natural build on the first six episodes. The “American remake” structure is a little too high concept at times, but Evans manages to find ways to follow through on those ideas of confronting a past career and being forced to define success in new ways.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Like the best “Last Chance U” seasons, this collection of ELAC episodes strikes a nice balance between highlighting school staff and these players trying to plan for their respective futures.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Sometimes a series like this is only as good as its lucky breaks. In this case, the Heaven descendants and Minden lifers bring a distinct energy to the show, peppering each historical overview and family legend with plenty of good-natured jabs and hearty recollections.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    There’s rarely a time in “For All Mankind” where these big swings are unwelcome, but the show still has a little more to go before all its storytelling tools are calibrated to deliver the kind of imagination it so clearly (and, often, thankfully) has.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Much like the dilemma faced by its main character, this is a spry half-hour comedy trapped inside the body of an hourlong series too expansive too early for its own good. Still, despite the elements that sometimes drag it down, Tudyk and those most locked into the energies of the show’s funnier side are enough to keep you curious about where Harry ends up.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Anchored by a couple of tremendous performances, “Losing Alice” can take an evocative color palette, a well-placed camera, and a few gentle moves to unlock some genuine uncertainty and anxiety. Watching this show is watching a handful of characters try to keep a grasp on their own story. There’s a real potency in seeing that not even they know when they’re successful or not.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    What’s remarkable is how much of that bouncy, vibrant spirit this series is able to retain [of the previous version] while also bucking some of the expectations shows of its kind are usually saddled with.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    This is Scorsese’s version of forwarding you an email with a link and insisting that, trust him, you just gotta read it. When viewed in full, this can’t help but feel more of a curio than a passion project for either of its main contributors. Still, those who share either of this pair’s love for the city or their views on its gradual evolution will likely enjoy the opportunity for time spent in their virtual company.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Even with the protomolecule saga relatively sidelined this season, “The Expanse” draws so much strength from exposing how fragile an expansive society like this is.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    If only more of this show had the visual and narrative daring to take what it posits as a Trial of the Decade and push beyond what’s a matter of public record. But as it is, it still harnesses the innate momentum of the scandal that preceded it and spins a tale that becomes a canvas for whatever you want to bring to help fill in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    At each point in the season when Suzie is faced with a pivotal decision, part of what makes “I Hate Suzie” fascinating is that both paths forward for her seem plausible. For every self-destructive leaning, there’s an equally viable route that won’t erase her past mistakes altogether, but at least will be a step towards alleviating the damage they’ve caused. That this show can present both options and still generate understanding for Suzie — regardless of where she goes next — is an effective trick to pull off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Fortunately, there’s enough warmth and empathy in “We Are the Champions” to keep the final product a well-intentioned look at what powers some of the odder corners of human achievement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    “The Reagans” is largely conventional in its structure. So while the series is compact and has a clear set of theses on the efficacy of his policies and the lasting effects of key rhetorical choices, there is a matching metanarrative in its very existence.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    “The Cost of Winning” barrels forward at such a quick pace that most of those chances to get to know them as people rather than players feel rushed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The narrative tightness of the story is never at odds with its diligent pacing. That combination allows each player in this expanding world to feel like they belong. The final chapter of “Save Me Too” is both a logical endpoint and a pathway to continuing. It’s a constant strength of this show that it’s filled with the kind of moments where other series would be content to bow out.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Like those often caught in the crosshairs, not every choice is a successful one, but there’s always something intriguing in seeing someone trying to navigate the impossible.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Up through the series’ parting sequence, which squares one individual’s punishment with a moment of self-reflection, “Tiger King” manages to tell an electrifying story with an open mind, a shrewd eye, and a delicate touch.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “How To” is filled with the kind of unexpected surprises that lead to belly laughs rather than gasps. Out of context, some of the ways that these episode topics connect to wider-reaching metaphors would seem saccharine or forced. But in the hands of Wilson and co-writers Michael Koman and Alice Gregory, there’s an earned earnestness to how this all plays out. There’s a certain strain of comforting self-awareness as “How To” connects the dots to those heartfelt conclusions the only way it can.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    It’s surprising “neXt” ends up with as much potential as it has. Clearly, no one has any idea what the coming months will bring, so the more that “neXt” sticks to what it can control, the better off it should fare.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Steve Greene
    So many of the characters in “Soulmates” are looking for trust. That search would mean more if the show around them had a little bit more of it.

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