Steve Johnson

Select another critic »
For 80 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Johnson's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Larry Sanders Show: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Luis: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 45 out of 80
  2. Negative: 14 out of 80
80 tv reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Johnson
    This version, 25 years after a first and relatively well-regarded mini-series, more than justifies the considerable effort that went into making it. It's a tale of soullessness with a remarkable depth of soul, of bloodsucking that's pulsing with red blood cells. [19 June 2004]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Johnson
    The predictability of it -- extending even to the fact that, yes, Underwood's and Fox's characters were once engaged -- is a shame. If a series is going to try to be groundbreaking in one respect, it ought to have the guts to do so in others as well, especially midway through the TV season, when the more interesting fare tends to be allowed to surface.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Johnson
    This one should be found in the greeting-card aisle, not on a major network's prime-time schedule.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 0 Steve Johnson
    It's leeringly sexual, ham-handed in its attempt to "confront" stereotypes, and just plain small-brained.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Johnson
    It is shot in the seemingly off-handed manner of an independent film, and its concerns are with fending off boredom as the days drift by. It is invigoratingly easygoing. [10 Sept 1997, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Johnson
    This is adapted, loosely, from the Archie comic books, and it's played in a light, bright comic-book style that is at once winningly broad and smartly sly. [27 Sept 1996, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Johnson
    At least at the outset, there's more than just a lot of potential. There's a lot of everything.... Parental beatdowns! Sibling rivalry! Drug money! Terminal illness! Blackmail! Betrayal! Gold chains! It's all so much, so soon.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 10 Steve Johnson
    In the first two episodes, at least, it plays too over the top to ring true. [24 Sept 2002, p.39]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Johnson
    If Karen Sisco can keep its tart tone, heady pacing and scripts that continue to respect viewers' intelligence, there ought to be an audience for this. [1 Oct 2003, p.C5]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Steve Johnson
    Me critic. You stink. [3 Oct 2003, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Johnson
    One of the finest of the new season series, this shimmeringly intelligent hospital drama returns Andre Braugher ("Homicide: Life on the Street") to series TV. Braugher plays, with typical depth and passion, Ben Gideon, a top cancer doc emotionally shaken after the loss of his wife. [10 Oct 2000, p.C8]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Johnson
    Some nicely realized mother-daughter moments fail to make up for the abundance of bad dialogue in the abundant confrontation scenes. [26 Jul 2000]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Johnson
    If you've never seen "The Sopranos" -- and haven't seen "Goodfellas," "Donnie Brasco" or some of the other morally ambiguous mob tales -- you may well consider it exciting television. Well acted and occasionally trusting the audience not to need everything spelled out for it, it could fairly be called a pretty good watch. [3 Apr 2000]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Johnson
    Turns out to be an engaging new hour, boasting crisp writing, near-cinematic production values and an almost fail-safe plot. [14 June 2002, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Johnson
    Nothing in this show has not been seen before. And nothing particularly deserves to be seen again. [17 Sep 2002]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Johnson
    Watching "Ellie"? Not if I can help it. ... Hacking through the contrivances, you find some strong supporting players ... But Louis-Dreyfus herself seems off. [26 Feb 2002]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Johnson
    What is not so wonderful is the program itself, which takes the ill-received 1995 movie starring Sandra Bullock as its starting point but doesn't seem to venture much further than that entertainment's idea: Put a gal with a fetching smile, a Gap wardrobe and a hacker's aptitude on the run for her life. [17 July 1998, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Steve Johnson
    The series shows signs of rising above its airport-bookstore pedigree, and it just happens to boast the best and deepest cast of any autumn newcomer. [17 Sept 1995, p.7C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Johnson
    Rachel Blanchard plays Cher (Emma), and while she still isn't up to Alicia Silverstone's standard for merging self-involvement and philanthropism she does a much better job with the new, stronger material, tonight dispensing bad advice in a guest stint as her school paper's Ann Landers. [20 Sept 1996, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Johnson
    The main problem is anemic writing that's more concerned with offering up jokes than making sure they make sense in context. The end result is one pooped Party Girl. [9 Sept 1996, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Johnson
    There is only so much time in a day, and Timecop, unless your only demand is for a lightweight diversion, fails to make a sufficient case for one-twenty-fourth of it. [22 Sept 1997, p.3C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Johnson
    L also stands for "lackluster."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Johnson
    Marred by clumsy dialogue, improbable events and characters so cliched as to be inhuman. [22 Sept 2003, p.3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Steve Johnson
    Roswell is, really, not bad. But in a prime-time universe crowded with quality dramas in general and quality supernatural dramas in particular, pretty good is not quite good enough. [4 Oct 1999, p.T1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Johnson
    Instead of trying to run on the fumes of style and attitude, a la "Twin Peaks," Murder One, at least in its premiere, has high octane in its tank. Boasting a tough, savvy script and the cast to handle it, the episode moves at a relentless pace from the discovery of the murder to Cross being charged with it. Along the way it establishes--or at least whets the viewer's appetite for more of--an intriguing assemblage of themes and characters. [19 Sept 1995, p.1C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Johnson
    When this show clicks in its first three episodes, it's because it violates a bigger rule, the one that says every New York firefighter, after the department's World Trade Center sacrifice, sports a halo and maybe a cape, and if he can carry a tune, he gets to sing at baseball games. [21 July 2004, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Johnson
    Back for a second season after receiving way too much praise in its first, the plastic-surgery drama Nip/Tuck continues to be as garish as its Miami setting. [22 June 2004, p.7]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Steve Johnson
    In the same way that "The Wire" showed there is an HBO way to update that staple of regular TV, the cop show, Deadwood demonstrates that the western can be revitalized, too, with a dose of extreme realism. [19 Mar 2004, p.C1]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Steve Johnson
    If audiences get less misogyny and more of the clever, clear-eyed social observation he is capable of, they may come to understand why he has been forever on the brink of stardom. [22 Jan 2003, p.10]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Johnson
    It's nicely cast but pretty much a pure formula piece from the Bruce Helford ("The Drew Carey Show") factory. The welcome diversion from the family sitcom recipe is that it puts a Latino (who happens to be pretty funny) in the lead role. But Helford drops in altogether too much gratuitous crudeness to make this acceptable as family viewing. [27 Mar 2002, p.C3]
    • Chicago Tribune

Top Trailers