For 208 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Pond's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 95 Belfast
Lowest review score: 30 The Tax Collector
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 3 out of 208
208 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Steve Pond
    It’s a history lesson you can dance to, and at times it’s an unexpectedly mournful and moving portrait of a city that has an intimate relationship with death and damage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Steve Pond
    It’s a potent film that explores the roots of the brilliant but troubled Irish singer ... but it also turns her recent years into an afterthought, bypassing many of the highs and lows that led her here over the last two decades.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Pond
    Eisenberg emerges as a restrained filmmaker who has a clear idea of what he wants to communicate, and a clear, unfussy way of delivering it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Pond
    A film that finds a new way to address a familiar subject.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Pond
    The Western is a genre weighted down with dark history, and Henry is a man in the same position, haunted to a degree that Nelson makes transfixing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 76 Steve Pond
    It’s a very entertaining trip, but it doesn’t really go anywhere: If you go in loving Kenny G you’ll come out that way, and if you go in hating him you won’t change your mind.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Pond
    The Survivor needs to be an unpleasant movie to watch, because you don’t want to simply use Nazi atrocities to advance the plot. So Levinson doles them out, makes them shock and then ties them into the postwar Haft standing in a ring and enduring merciless beatings.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 81 Steve Pond
    Dark and unsettling, The Forgiven doesn’t ask us to like its characters, but it forces us to watch as privilege begins to shatter and people for whom everything feels inconsequential have to deal with consequences.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 76 Steve Pond
    It’s messy at times and melodramatic at others, and its treatment of mental health issues is not the most nuanced, but those feel like quibbles given the joy you can find in its best moments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Pond
    Does the film explain “Hallelujah?” Of course not – the song stubbornly resists explanation, because it’s so many different things and because there’s a beautiful mystery at its heart. Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song is smart enough to embrace that mystery and that beauty, and to know that there’s far more to Cohen than can be summed up in four, or seven, or even 150 verses.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 55 Steve Pond
    For a film that tries to be a bravura piece of genre-hopping cinema, “Encounter” too often feels confused rather than assured.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 95 Steve Pond
    The film feels true in the way it must be exploring Branagh’s memories of a tumultuous and confusing time, and the way it pays tribute to a vibrant community as that community is irrevocably changed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 79 Steve Pond
    Fuqua, like Möller before him, doesn’t really give you time to sit back and think about it. The Guilty stays in one place but moves like a tough, efficient action flick; it’s a thrill ride in an office chair.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Steve Pond
    If you’re a diehard fan, you’ll probably glory in what the film delivers and wish there were more of it; if you’re not, you may find yourself power-chorded into submission sometime before the 2-hour and 17-minute running time comes to an end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Pond
    Villeneuve’s Dune is both dazzling and frustrating, often spectacular and often slow. It’s huge and loud and impressive but it can also be humorless and bleak – though on the whole, it tries valiantly to address the problems of taking on Herbert’s complex epic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 82 Steve Pond
    Clara Sola mixes religion, mysticism and sexuality in a way that feels simultaneously odd, disquieting and richly rewarding. It starts out beautifully restrained and ends up somewhere else entirely, but it’s all the more interesting for its split personality.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 81 Steve Pond
    Everlasting Storm is an anthology film that is as uneven as most anthology films, but one that offers a disquieting and essential snapshot of the time from which we hope we’re emerging. Like the lockdown itself, it can be a slog and it can be a kick.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 79 Steve Pond
    The film is a dark slice of neorealism with a palpable sense of claustrophobia that Ada feels in her life and in her family. But her relationship to what is essentially imprisonment is odd and complex; she seems desperate to get out and exercise some control of her life, but there are strange cracks in that desperation, signs that she’s terrified of what even a modicum of freedom and control might bring.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 84 Steve Pond
    Both actors are riveting in this sad duet, and Lafosse isn’t much interested in giving them a facile reconciliation. Everything is hard in The Restless, a potent drama that never quite succumbs to dread but always keeps it close at hand.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Steve Pond
    The melodrama can be effective at times, and there’s an admirable urgency with which it tackles significant issues in U.S. immigration policy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 81 Steve Pond
    "The Story of Film" is long (though not by Cousins’ standards), it’s infuriating at times (entirely by design) and it overstates its case with defiant glee (again, it meant to do that), but you can’t love movies and not love a good chunk of what Cousins puts on the screen.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 79 Steve Pond
    The director is more interested in quietly telling the story of two specific women, and letting the audience grasp the big picture without much prodding.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 79 Steve Pond
    While the film sometimes struggles with disparate tones, it’s a solid, subtle drama that opts in most cases for restraint over excess.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 79 Steve Pond
    The result is hugely impressive and awfully scattershot, a wry piece of art that is always entertaining but also so excruciatingly detailed that you wonder if it will connect the way the more emotional, more fully drawn stories of “Grand Budapest,” “Moonrise Kingdom” or “The Royal Tenenbaums” did.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 94 Steve Pond
    It’s a dark, disturbing and glorious film about a dark, disturbing and glorious band, and another sign that Haynes knows how to put music onscreen in a way that few other directors do.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Pond
    Val
    Awkward at times and affecting at others, Val doesn’t come across as a story about acting – instead, it’s a pretty straightforward tour through Kilmer’s career with lots of mostly mild anecdotes along the way.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Steve Pond
    For better and for worse, Carax never goes for half measures and Annette never stops being bold and weird.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 72 Steve Pond
    It effectively makes the case for the startling musical genius of Brian Wilson, using celebrity testimony and musical examples to paint a clear portrait of the troubled songwriter, producer and singer as a protean pop creator. And the frustrating thing about “Long Promised Road” is that it makes that case and then keeps making it for an hour and a half.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Pond
    While you can view the film as a companion piece to “How I’m Feeling Now” that is mostly aimed at people who love that album, it also has moments where it transcends that to become is an intimate examination of community in a time of isolation. And in those moments, the film has an impact that reaches far beyond what it shows you about one artist’s music.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 82 Steve Pond
    The old footage puts us in the studio in 1994, the new moments supply some valuable context and the ragged nature of the film eventually begins to feel of a piece with the ragged nature of the album.

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