Tambay Obenson

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For 38 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tambay Obenson's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 P-Valley: Season 1
Lowest review score: 25 Truth Be Told (2019): Season 2
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 38
  2. Negative: 7 out of 38
38 tv reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Tambay Obenson
    “61st Street” doesn’t make any transgressive choices in its approach to story, style, and/or structure in order to separate itself from the assembly line of similar shows. ... But the bravado performances from its starring cast, and straightforward, non-sensationalized handling of the story — both in the writing and directing — should appeal to hopeful viewers looking for signs of morality and bravery especially within the main branches of government.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Tambay Obenson
    It encourages conversation about mortality, passing along wisdom and wealth across generations, honoring the sacrifices of others, and anticipating the promises of the future. It just takes an unnecessarily laborious path to communicate its themes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Tambay Obenson
    It becomes a narrative house of mirrors, as the viewer is prompted to question the effectiveness of each character’s motives and secrets before yet another potential season-ending twist, the kind of which Shyamalan has become infamous.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 42 Tambay Obenson
    In a bid to be inclusive, it tries to do too much and isn’t navigated by a clear narrative voice. It’s not the first, and likely won’t be the last account of Emmett Till’s murder and aftermath. It’s unfortunate that it doesn’t do enough to separate itself from the deluge.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Tambay Obenson
    It’s ultimately a middling, entirely unnecessary new take on Verne’s classic adventure novel, and its main cast seems aware they’re starring in what amounts to an afterschool special.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 33 Tambay Obenson
    There is some sense of satisfaction to be derived from the last two episodes as it clunkily solves its many mysteries, even if it’s of a self-congratulatory nature for making it that far into the series. But it takes a laborious path to get there, and by the time the gift is fully unwrapped, in a lengthy, exposition-heavy confession, the surprise is, if not anticlimactic, then just plain silly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 33 Tambay Obenson
    “1883” is anything but nuanced. It’s an R-rated “Little House on the Prairie,” even though that heavy-handed 1970s–’80s series, as problematic as it was, handled storylines about settler prejudices and gender inequality more adroitly than it’s given credit for. ... “1883” just feels like a series out of time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Tambay Obenson
    There’s enough early momentum supported by convincing performances, chemistry between the two leads, a setting that is its own character, vampire encounters, and general whoopee vibrations that indicate how much fun co-creators Thornton and Fletcher likely had in making it. It’s palpable and contagious. Let’s hope it doesn’t later betray the promise it kicks off with.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 25 Tambay Obenson
    “Book II” plucks from low-hanging fruit, appealing to its audience’s baser instincts, which isn’t a narrative sin; but the fast-paced, plot-driven spinoff lacks an emotional hook.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 42 Tambay Obenson
    While Hart and co-star Wesley Snipes, in their first onscreen matchup, make for a high-octane duo, the script betrays that effort with uninspired writing from series creator, writer, and showrunner Eric Newman (“Narcos: Mexico”) that doesn’t quite make darkness its ally, and leans too much on plot conveniences and a predictability that mutes suspense.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    If its goal is to foreground the narrative surrounding missing Black girls and women on a highly accessible platform, “Black and Missing” succeeds.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Tambay Obenson
    It’s absolutely brutal, which obviously won’t appeal to all. At times, the general consensus of “See” feels earned: that it’s a discounted “Game of Thrones.” Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t. But even if it were, what of it? Ultimately there’s really nothing new under the sun. You’re either entertained by it or your not. By and large, I was.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 25 Tambay Obenson
    What’s going on? Too much. And too much to not care about. It’s a series that’s trying to rep Robert Altman, but it just doesn’t work.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    The series informs viewers of how slaves passed on a centuries-old story tradition, all the way down to the church’s foundational role as a safe space for African American solidarity where they had no choice but to become one new people. ... It is clear that the Black church is evolving, whether as a competitive, uber-charged contest of thoughts about what it should be, or as a furthering of the civil rights divinatory dictum of social change.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Tambay Obenson
    There’s potential there for a compelling Robin Hood-esque fable that could be exciting. Alas, it’s CBS, and time will tell whether the show’s creators and showrunners, Andrew Marlowe and Terri Miller, will exploit any far more intriguing possibilities.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Tambay Obenson
    The film brings the book to its own visual life, and does so in a creative, engaging style, speaking to the country’s schizophrenia, and tells the truth about America, because history is often told from records left by the privileged.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 33 Tambay Obenson
    It’s unfortunately just tedious. It’s clearly an experiment, but nothing here is particularly groundbreaking. It does not reframe the conversation enough, unless you derive pleasure from self-torment or degradation.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    It’s a thorough history of the effort to restrict and shame Black mobility, and it’s a must-watch.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Tambay Obenson
    “Devils” isn’t compelling, courageous, or sharply observed enough in tackling the real-world issues to speak to today.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Tambay Obenson
    “Woke” has a serious spine, but the tone is light, even goofy, as a dramedy so caught up in what it thinks are teachable moments that it often doesn’t succeed at either.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Tambay Obenson
    “Noughts + Crosses” should be a far more uncomfortable, necessary watch in uncertain times of peak racial and social unrest. It’s clearly striving for that, but it isn’t as radical as it could be.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Tambay Obenson
    “Lovecraft Country” is a chimerical portrait of racism in America, and it couldn’t arrive at a more timely moment, as the nation contends with a vast reckoning. The rules of the world Green has created remain confounding. Still, there’s enough reason to watch, but patience will be necessary to see where it all will ultimately lead.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    Ultimately, the series knows exactly what it wants to be: a sexy, fast-paced drama that sets out to de-stigmatize the world of stripping and shatter misconceptions. It succeeds. “P-Valley” is an engrossing ride into the Mississippi swamp, and like nothing audiences have ever seen on television. Welcome to the Dirty South.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    “I May Destroy You” is moving and, despite the subject matter, at times very funny. It should inspire plenty of conversation about very sensitive subject matter with ever-increasing complexities. It marks bold new territory for Coel, who’s operating at a level unmatched among her peers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Tambay Obenson
    It’s very soapy, but not quite addictive, ending with a cliffhanger that all-but screams a second season is as inevitable as Thanos.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 33 Tambay Obenson
    It feels like a kind of confessional — although it rarely rises above surface-level self-aggrandizing — and it meanders due to the absence of a clearly expressed series arc. ... Except for the occasional one-liner that lands, it’s just not funny, and is often tedious to watch.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    Unsettling and engrossing, “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered” is a must watch. It will leave audiences baffled and enraged over how justice for these wicked, unusually extreme crimes, has yet to be properly served.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Tambay Obenson
    “The Good Fight” is a spin-off that’s better than the original, and, four seasons in, as it settles into its own rhythm, it only continues to get better.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 25 Tambay Obenson
    Don’t expect much of a deep dive into the itinerant history of Walker’s business, which is highly abridged in the series, as are her philanthropic and social work. But what did end up on the screen is very awkward at best.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Tambay Obenson
    At its best, “Black Monday” operates as a satire meant to epitomize everything that has gone wrong with big money culture. At its worst, it’s a muddle. If there is a destination, it takes the most circuitous path to get there. It feels frenzied and forced, as though straining to make the most over-the-top series depicting Wall Street excess ever.

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