For 111 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Thom Ernst's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Agnes
Lowest review score: 16 Nemesis
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 111
  2. Negative: 4 out of 111
111 movie reviews
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Thom Ernst
    I saw Firestarter at a late-night screening. A person in the audience talked loudly on their phone for much of the film's second half. No one asked them to stop. No one cared.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Thom Ernst
    Vogt masterfully—undoubtedly infuriating for some - understates the horror in his film by filtering it through a bright summer Nordic sun while adults mill about oblivious to the violence around them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Thom Ernst
    The Sadness is good. Not just genre-specific good, but cinema good. And even when it arrives at the inevitable ‘who are the real monsters’ scene, The Sadness still has bite.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Thom Ernst
    McCabe-Loko substitutes erratic behaviour and raised voices for tension. But Stanleyville does seem to have something to say. Just because I cannot decipher any significant meaning doesn't mean you won't. Then again, in the words of someone wiser than me, some films are merely meant to be experienced. That could be the case with Stanleyville. I only wish the experience was a bit more enjoyable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Thom Ernst
    It’s not wise to dive head first into Deep Water. But if you dip your toe and slide slowly, you might wade neck deep in a cool erotic thriller.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Thom Ernst
    It would be easy to simply recount the stages and progressions of growing up, coming age, self-discovery, and sexual awakenings. Wildhood is all that, but it also dips into identity issues that run deeper than what is affected visual clues and by the preference of touch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Thom Ernst
    Simply said, there is magic in this film, rising out of simple observations, allowing the camera to linger through moments of play, pausing for glimpses of charity while holding fast to the possibility of tragedy. A film that nurtures a balance of trust with betrayal.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 58 Thom Ernst
    It's harmless fun, enough to achieve a place among music movie curios like Ringo Starr/Harry Nillson's unwatchable Son of Dracula (1973) and the equally cringe-worthy Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park (1978). For what it’s worth, Studio 666 is leagues better than both of those efforts.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Thom Ernst
    Uncharted once again confirms my belief that video games make for bad to mediocre movies. At least Uncharted scrounges up enough fortitude to be mediocre.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Thom Ernst
    This will disappoint those who prefer their werewolves with teeth. Still, The Cursed rises above most standards set by the genre. I only wish I could say it was a Howling success.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    Horror fans will find that Paxton's film is not a straight-ahead feast of digestible thrills and chills. Others might perceive it as an acquired taste. A Banquet requires a deliberate decision to watch as it doesn't pair well with distractions and traditional expectations.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 91 Thom Ernst
    As is required of the story, Branagh isolates and imposes suspicions and conflicts so that every character becomes equal part victim and villain.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    Where a lot of films, particularly in this genre, fall apart in the third act, Scream 2022 holds out for a satisfying payoff. But Scream 2022 spends more time winking to the audience than building tension. And for a horror film, tension is a trope too significant to be overlooked. Even if it is just one more requel to add to the list.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 42 Thom Ernst
    Despite some exemplary action sequences, including an impressive chase scene through the streets of Paris and into the subterranean tubes, The 355 fails to shed the tropes of male gaze and the kickass female fetishes of Kill Bill, Charlie's Angels, and every film Luc Besson has made with a female lead.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Thom Ernst
    The film is blessedly short, which does allow for its quirky pace and oddball plotting to play out without exhausting the viewer’s curiosity, even if it is just a series of head-scratching WTF? scenes leading to nowhere.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Thom Ernst
    Okita keeps a firm grip on the film's action, maneuvering the story through its layers of twists and possibilities without putting too much of a strain on our disbelief.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    Death to Metal is something of a fresh breath of stale air. In a genre long familiar with demonizing nuns, having an evil priest is a nice change of habit.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    The King's Man takes known characters and events perverting truth with fiction. It's an amusing enough exercise even as it can jog free a few lost but freely interpreted high-school history lessons.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Thom Ernst
    Agnes is a genre breaker that veers into unanticipated areas of drama, some of it absurd, some street-wise, and yet inescapably entertaining.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    The Hand of God lacks the imagination and mysticism that elevated The Great Beauty from being just a navel-gazing narrative about film. And the movie's presumptions about sexuality and coming-of-age are far too male-centric to be comfortably amusing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Thom Ernst
    Raccoon City is most fun when showcasing Avan Jogia as a rookie cop who’d been transferred to Raccoon City after accidentally shooting his partner in the butt—a bad joke that Jogia turns into a workable gag.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Thom Ernst
    Tick, Tick…Boom! packs a great deal of joy into a story that pushes a more modern and darker take on the make-it-or-break-it mantra of classic ‘40s musicals. The songs are engaging and staged with a feel-good choreography that consists less of formalized dance (for the most part) than it does gleeful bursts of movement.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 91 Thom Ernst
    Visually, Antlers is stunning as a portrait of a town dying. And there are plenty of gruesome, hide-behind-your-eyes scenes to satisfy most genre fans. But it's Cooper's commitment to his characters and the performance of the film's two youngest leads that make Antlers more than just a movie about killer—well, you'll have to see for yourself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Thom Ernst
    Knocking is a configuration of atmosphere and dread, paced at a speed of unflinching stillness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    Falling for Figaro is a small story about big dreams that soft-peddles through familiar territory. Figaro can be as fluffy as the fur on a blow-dried angora cat but it scores big on its ready-and willing-to-please charm.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    Halloween is still a Michael Myers slasher film. People meet horrible ends in extreme ways, and the plot rarely goes beyond the idea that someone really should put an end to all this nonsense. The difference in Green's film is that he gives us a taste of the emotional aftermath; and that can be more horrifying than the kill itself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Thom Ernst
    The Old Ways might have continued along a path of deception and naïve beliefs and have survived on its bleak and irreverent humour, but director Alender steers the film from dark to darker. It’s not quite an about-face, as the film never reaches a point where it can be taken too seriously, but it does churn out a few unexpected and unpleasant shocks.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Thom Ernst
    Demigod is a small but effective seasonal treat; One of the few independent horror films that get tossed into the October horror real-estate that deserves a look.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Thom Ernst
    Scott contrives a convincing resemblance to events leading up to the last court-sanctioned duel-to-the-death with a meticulous eye for specifics. He transfers a riveting piece of history into a riveting film—mostly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Thom Ernst
    In drawing similes between the then and the now, Goulet juxtaposes history with prophecy. Using conventional science-fiction tropes—the collapse of society, a military state, dystopia, and unidentified flying orbs—she creates a sound case for entertainment to share the screen with stories that have meaning and social impact.

Top Trailers