For 1,064 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tim Goodman's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Rectify: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Knight Rider: Season 1
Score distribution:
1064 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    Back is one of the funniest and most intriguingly different comedies in a long time. ... it's Blackwell's intelligent and searing writing--which also has quite a bit of emotional nuance--that makes Back much more than mere joke creation for its own sake. And it's Mitchell and Webb who make it all come to life, with Mitchell's virtuoso performance as the increasingly paranoid Stephen shining through all six episodes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Tim Goodman
    Terrible...The first five minutes of Salem's Lot are great. Well, four minutes. And then Lowe's voice-over kicks in, which essentially starts the poison drip. It's a lot of King-speak, which is annoying and so formulaic it ought to be patented (and might be). There's a line about "dull, mindless, moronic evil," which is pretty much a perfect synopsis of the movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Goodman
    It's edge-of-the-couch good in some spots. The trouble is that it has too many spots. So many that the title should have been changed to "Story That Lasts a Century." When you're done with all six hours of "Storm" you'll be exhausted. And if you're not one of King's rabid fans who will forgive him anything, you'll have a similar thought: "Gee, that was pretty good. Could have done it in two hours, but I'll live."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Tim Goodman
    Based on the two-hour premiere, a hodgepodge of false dramatic starts, bad acting, rambling scenes, a stupendously annoying narrator and a metaphorical anteater that looks like, of all things, ALF, there's only one conclusion to draw: Those things aren't scary. They're stupid.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    The show is good but not great. It feels redundant because it is - two times over, if you count the movie. There's no denying that's a huge drawback, no matter how brooding Gedrick and Welliver get. And, from a pure entertainment stand point, it's less satisfying to see Falcone's wife and family implode than it is to see what's happening with Tony Soprano's home life. Sorry, but it's true.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    Dublin Murders [is] a mess and, in parts, preposterous. Having watched all eight episodes knowing that an intricate (OK, fine, farfetched) set of plot points wouldn’t come together until, at the earliest, the seventh episode, I'll just tell you (since we're still in the Peak TV era with no signs of let-up): Don't bother.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    A wonderfully nuanced story that's both extremely funny and tragically sad, but never leans too hard in either direction to get a reaction. It just exists and, after six episodes, it ends — and when it does you get the full appreciation of how exceptional it is. ... Back to Life is a real, unexpected gem of a series and one of the better surprises of 2019.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    The good news is that season two of The End of the F***ing World stays true to the vibe of the first season, has a decently good but not great story and manages, by the end of the final episode (of eight in total), to have righted most of the wrongs that came before it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    Jack Ryan is still fun, despite being a little bit ridiculous and predictable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Goodman
    You'll find some urgency as episodes wrap, but not a lot. And there's no doubt that the world For All Mankind wants to build is populated with an almost staggering number of people, each getting bits of story, but outside of the women-going-to-space idea, not a lot of it is particularly interesting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    All three of the episodes are very strong and that's a good sign heading to the exit.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    The Cry never feels overtly tricky, even though director Glendyn Ivin plays around with flashbacks at a ferocious pace. The series deftly sets up jealous ex-wife Alexandra as a suspect, while never letting viewers escape the notion that Joanna, who has become essentially non-functional, might have been involved.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Goodman
    Some of the story arc decisions are dubious (it works better at being funny than being serious) and often it feels like Living With Yourself needs to slow down and stretch for a bit, luxuriating in the ease of the idea. Instead, it races into scenarios that feel forced. There's still a lot to like about the series and maybe it will work better as it gets comfortable in its own skin.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    Relentlessly entertaining, odd and creative... Watchmen is a tour-de-force, no doubt, but there's a landing that definitely needs to be stuck.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Tim Goodman
    The missing ingredient, however, is the writing. Treadstone is all action and no brains. ... While lots of action films require the audience to suspend disbelief at times, Treadstone requires them to saw the tops of their own heads off and remove the gooey blob inside. It's the only way you'll survive the writing. Even the actors sometimes look stunned.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Almost all the choices in Modern Love are the right ones. It's a simple, endearing collection that makes for compelling television.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Some [episodes] are excellent, some strain credibility to the breaking point (a familiar trait in later seasons, but not so damaging as to seriously dent the show's reputation), some feel uniquely contemplative and odd, others seem alive with forward momentum. It's a strong start, but it's very clearly the end that will matter.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 20 Tim Goodman
    A show that's a complete mess almost from the first moments it comes on your screen. ... Nobody acts like an actual person. They act like they are in a sitcom or a weak drama.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    Whitaker is excellent, D'Onofrio's wilder side meshes with Sorvino's quiet one, and Thatch, who has already played Malcolm X before in Selma, is excellent playing off both Whitaker and Esposito. ... By the end of the third episode, the series has leaned in hard to more soap-box and/or convenient moments to tie these massive storylines into something cohesive, but it's too rushed and manipulative, with the episode's ending looking like a music video.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Goodman
    This one just kind of sits there for 30 minutes, pleasant but not particularly funny as it sets up the Hart family. Lots of comedies get better after four or five episodes. It's your call. The downside to Bless the Harts not exactly lighting things up in the pilot is that the one thing it does do is make you want to watch King of the Hill.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    If Stumptown is going to continue beating the odds as something more than an average network drama, it would do well to continue leaning into Smulders and letting her be sarcastic and kick-ass as much as possible, with Johnson's more level-headed advice as her best friend grounding everything. ... At least the pilot finds Stumptown pushing most of the right buttons out of the gate.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    The standout piece is called Quarter Life Poetry, starring, written and created by Samantha Jayne. ... [Oh Jerome] Interesting micro-story? Sure. Funny? Sometimes. Original? Meh. But maybe that's how Cake will go each week — viewers get presented with a grab-bag of visual goodies and if they don't like one thing then something else will be right behind it. ... It's certainly worth checking out future episodes to see if the concept works.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Goodman
    Sometimes the idea for a series is better than the execution. ... The repetition of the will-the-suspect-break idea begins to nag. Worse, and perhaps this is an American-based red flag, the legal counsel in all four countries leaves a lot to be desired. ... Criminal is an interesting if not necessarily original idea, and you can see the appeal for Netflix, but viewers are likely to want something more expansive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    I appreciated loving the parts I wasn't expecting to and often tempered my disappointment in it not getting to the "alt-country" artists I most wanted to see by realizing that Country Music is simply not that kind of niche (or definitive) documentary. It's mostly a brave effort to place it in context with an impressive timeline.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    A brilliantly taut drama — that jams more into its 23- to 25-minute episodes than most hourlong American dramas — with a lingering emotional after-effect. All of those elements remain in the second season. ... Mr Inbetween remains one of the best series people aren’t watching.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    It's hard not to imagine the whole thing working better if it could perhaps last longer and develop its characters more naturally. ... Mrs. Fletcher feels both unfinished and rushed — the seven half-hour episodes failing to cement a story rather than just the feeling of a story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    There are shorthand cliches about duty, country and spying that could have been excised. But, flaws aside, this mostly true story of Israel's most famous spy makes for a compelling story, fueled by Cohen's strongest dramatic work yet.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    It takes a few episodes for the series to introduce and spin out this cobbled mythology — and that will undoubtedly lose some people — but ultimately it works when it gets going. Carnival Row has a strong cast . ... If you're not into fantasy, that probably seems a real hodgepodge of mythos, but Carnival Row succeeds precisely because it's different (and looks expensive while creatively employing its CGI).
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    The thing to embrace and appreciate with Succession in this second season is just how superbly and seemingly effortlessly structured it is with its grandiose plotting; other than making us care about the Roys, that's the next-level miracle. The Emmys did recognize Succession but not nearly enough, by the way. This series is doing something special and the rich rewards will be coming.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    The series starts off in a boggle and never really resets, flitting around trying to find both tone and purpose. Any ties to the film are…remote.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 10 Tim Goodman
    There's really no other way around this — the work on Another Life is not good. The writing is atrocious, leaving the actors to follow a jumble of disconnected emotions or pointless journeys within their characters (or maybe they were just looking to escape) and the directing is...off.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Juggling more adult fare, Heller manages to make Pennyworth a compelling modern drama but adds in a darker hint of comic book ink, never letting the tone tilt too much toward the outlandish or over-the-top, but also just unhinged enough to stand out.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    What follows is ridiculous, start to confounding finish, and yet it is so insanely funny that such a thing actually exists and will be available on Netflix, perhaps forever, that it comes off almost as performance art. ... In the end, all that matters is that the rules of old television are broken.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    There are many levels of successful and riveting storytelling in Shangri-La. Rubin's early career is so drastically different from his present life that the evolution is a can't-miss arc. ... If there is one area where Shangri-La falls flat, it's in not getting a little dirtier and messier in the examination of those middle years.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    On top of the nuanced work from Davies and Jones, the six-part series boasts outstanding performances. Looking through the opposite end of the telescope at present (and controversial) history is often a recipe for disaster, but Years and Years is magnificently agile in the creativity it uses to make it all cohere.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    Without the full season to examine at length (out of eight total episodes, I've seen four), who knows what will happen. But I'm loving the direction the third and final season of Legion is going in because the journey has been less about Marvel and more about Hawley and, given the television track record of each, I'll take the latter every time. There's an unmistakable creative energy about each episode of the third season, as if Hawley, his writing staff and collection of directors all gathered around and said, "Let's go out on fire."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    Ultimately, Das Boot looks to be a wonderful find for fans of high-quality international television series with real ambition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    City on a Hill feels like a throwback in 2019 because it's not worried about binge-pacing or whether or not you've overcommitted to too many other shows. It has a confidence in its novelistic approach. That's admirable but not without problems, of course: The world building is impressive but the pace is worrisome.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    An early career-defining performance from Zendaya, who is an absolute revelation here; a similarly fantastic breakout performance from trans actress and model Hunter Schafer in her first major role; and strong work from Levinson, who created, wrote and directed (five of the eight episodes), getting the vehicle that emphatically announces his arrival.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    One offering is clearly lesser than the other two and one of the rare broad misses that the series sometimes delivers. Ah, but the other two episodes this season are exceptional, a timely reminder that Brooker remains restlessly creative and still enormously interested in the genre, having moved it beyond "tech paranoia" to the aforementioned more nuanced exploration of how technology changes our emotional and intimate connections with loved ones, family and friends.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    While two episodes isn't normally enough to fully establish a tone, this pair are beautiful and funny and unleash on the viewer a bevy of excellent characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    The end result is a feel-good romp and creative triumph that is easily digestible and never flags in search of entertainment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 10 Tim Goodman
    What/If basically rips off Indecent Proposal and then admits to doing so, as if that's a clever thing. The series stars a miscast Renée Zellweger as Anne Montgomery. ... [The episodes] are larded with bad writing, dubious editing choices and the kind of weightless fluff that props up most network soap operas.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    Turturro is in many ways the best thing about the show, diving into the material's complexity and bringing a steadying screen presence to what, in short order, becomes a real mess.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    Fleabag the character is as brilliantly funny, damaged and wholly original as when we last saw her, but the show's purpose and direction feel less sharp here (and since there are no plans for a third season, that's how it will go out).
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    It still holds up as a compelling story, even if you're missing the myriad call-back references from the first four seasons. ... It's a testament to Mercurio that just when you think, "Well, this person is clearly guilty, as all the evidence suggests," he's got multiple switch-backs and loopholes to play with.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Surprisingly effective miniseries. ... Even if you haven't read the book or can't quite recall all the participants, it comes back to you, but it's still a challenge to differentiate everyone. Some fans will no doubt wish certain characters had bigger roles or might have minor irritations over how things were condensed, but overall the pacing is strong and the inclusion thorough.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Goodman
    There ultimately isn't much let-up and Chernobyl is both successful for never wincing at the fallout as it gets to the truth of the issue and hampered by the relentless bleakness of the topic and its depiction. ... You should at least know what you're getting into with Chernobyl and if you can face that awful, true story, then by all means take it in. But it won't be for everyone.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    [A] jaunty, funny, smart and touching story.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    It still goes down like a particularly glug-glug-glug-able cocktail, as effervescent and fun and thrilling and smart and witty as ever--which is the heaviest half of the equation. Also: It's still as believable and twisty, an emotional entanglement of motives and obsessions and tactical fun that a psychopathic assassin can have with the in-over-her-head agent on her tail.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 10 Tim Goodman
    They manage to take plenty of good actors and give them nothing, leaving them slipping around in vanilla. Even writer Glen Morgan, who has done excellent work, especially in the original X-Files series, can't bring any of these episodes to life. ... All four episodes are bad, but the first two are terrible.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    There really was no doubt that Veep was going to kill it in this final season. ... This season seems to delight just a little bit more in turning the mirror on present-day American politics, and there are some astoundingly funny send-ups along the way. There is also some sublime humor that proves all targets are in play
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    Turn Up Charlie isn't [a watchable series], mostly because of all the ridiculous conceits added to the premise, which effectively shift the lead of the series to a child actress written to be insanely annoying and who delivers on that in every scene she's in.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Goodman
    Manhunt bleaches out the titillation and zeroes in on the detective work, which is an honorable diversion from the norm even if there are some dramatic trade-offs along the way and some shortcomings on the character-development side. The one fully drawn person here is, not surprisingly, Sutton (played by Martin Clunes of Doc Martin, Vanity Fair, etc.).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    Funny and inventive. ... The real achievement might be in how surprisingly fresh the conceit feels episode after episode, which is no easy feat.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    The last six episodes of Catastrophe are not unlike the 18 that came before--often brilliant, relentlessly hilarious and searing in the process, depicting one of TV's best and most unexpected pairings of two actors (also the creators and writers, of course), who somehow making their coupling, as unromantic as it was, believable, with every episode over the course of the series run giving off an authenticity that allowed viewers to think, "Yeah, I can see how this works for them, even when it's not working." A nice trick, that.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    Season three of Better Things continues to be exceptionally great without him [Louis C.K] — precisely because this is Adlon's experience and POV via a TV show that mirrors aspects of her own life and conveys what she fearlessly wants to put out in the world about being a woman, being a mother, being a daughter. And all of that is keenly evident in this new season, with even more development of her directorial skills.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    A weak-tea and eye-rolling bit of mystery and loss.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    Netflix already has A Series of Unfortunate Events and could have easily titled The Umbrella Academy, its new series, A Series of Pointless Scenes. ... It probably doesn't help that the writing is superficial and the acting suboptimal, or that the whole thing relies on an ostensible quirkiness and viewers' innate sense that they've seen echoes of this many other places.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    Buscemi is wasted on subpar material. So is Radcliffe for that matter. Perky side characters played by Geraldine Viswanathan and Karan Soni have potential, but again, the mediocre material holds them back and lets the mind wander to better shows, particularly one less interested in heaven and more interested in earth (and aliens).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Goodman
    In its best moments, PEN15 is like a juvenile version of Broad City--creatively bold, out there and simple in its directness as it follows two best friends testing the bounds of friendship. ... But the downside is the repetitive sketch feel of the whole thing, which can wear thin over 30 minutes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Like David Simon, Blick is the kind of storyteller who's drawn to a form of bleak realism because that's where the tough stories that need to be told reside. In that sense, his work requires something of a commitment from viewers, but Black Earth Rising and Blick's previous work illustrate that it's one worth making.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    The poignant (get the tissues ready), entertaining and informative documentary hits on a lot of emotions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Brexit is briskly entertaining, driven by a different kind of lead performance from Benedict Cumberbatch--he's less leading man (he's balding and pasty here) and more leading brain, which of course he also excels at. ... For Americans, even if that story isn't our own, it's absolutely relatable and that makes it interesting.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    An idea that works when it probably shouldn't and, in fact, generates a considerable amount of joy and entertainment as it moves quickly through an important and complicated retelling of not only the "browser wars" that kicked off when the internet was something people had never heard of, but also the myriad other elements at play in the period.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Tim Goodman
    It's hard to imagine that a half-hour comedy set on Wall Street with Don Cheadle and Andrew Rannells in major parts could go off the rails so quickly and spectacularly, but Showtime's latest, Black Monday, does just that. And that's even before you factor in Regina Hall giving arguably the best performance in the bunch. ... A lot of talent wasted working on something that seems thrown together, unstructured and ill-advised.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Not all of it works. But the bulk of it does and there are ongoing surprises along the way that deepen the story. ... Even when Informer hits some potholes (and plot holes), it stays on track because Rizwan, Nsengiyumva and Considine never flag in their performances. It's truly great work from all of them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Goodman
    I think Bandersnatch--yes, technically a movie rather than an episode for Emmy purposes--will rank somewhere below the middle of the pack when all is said and done.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Allowing for the sweetness in Adams' original work to come out in this modern take is part of what makes the BBC-Netflix version of Watership Down work best. The conversations and character development of the rabbits are the bricks that build the story. And while the animation is at first a downside--seemingly retro, too saturated with brown and black tones, making many of the rabbits indistinguishable from one another--that limitation allows the voice work to shine, which of course relies heavily on Adams' lovely descriptions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Early episodes don't leap off the small screen like they did last year (which is understandable, having lost the element of uniqueness) and a proper evaluation will have to wait a little bit longer. That said, all the episodes are strong.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Goodman
    Unfortunately, all the top-notch acting can't quite overcome the pacing problems of Escape at Dannemora. It takes five episodes to get out of the prison and even Stiller's most impressive and creative efforts at illuminating all the discovery, digging and sweat it took to get there can't make it more exciting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    A wonderfully sinister look at what happens when a mostly unhappy person in a mostly unhappy life opens the door to a manic pixie dream girl who also happens to be toxically awful and hard to shake upon further inspection. ... Davis is always doing something audacious with her comedy and it works because she doesn't ever blink or water it down, or laden it with sympathy. She's the master of how to do unlikable characters.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    The delightfully creative series from writer, director and creator Steven Conrad (The Pursuit of Happyness, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty) returns better than ever, a wholly original vision that has distant-cousin connections to the vibe of the Fargo television series and Wes Anderson films, while being its own weird thing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Bodyguard succeeds almost immediately at setting the hook and then races for six episodes and six-plus hours of pulse-pounding action and brain-bending twists, which, when it's all said and done, is more than enough to justify watching.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Writer Payne and director Snellin keep the story intimate (even when one big early twist seems more convenience than coincidence), managing a series of creative choices that bring enlightenment and surprise to a well-worn concept as each episode unfolds.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    All told there's much to like in The Kids Are Alright, partly owing to the era being ripe with possibilities and partly because Doyle's sense of humor about his childhood rings mostly true as it reflects and finds well-earned comedy in nostalgia.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    The casting comes off like it was just Dunham and Konner picking friends to fill out roles, which results in an across-the-board lack of chemistry (or much interest) as the story unfolds. And while Camping is indeed supposed to be a story of misery (because none of these people seem like campers, which is probably the central joke of the original series), making Walt's birthday weekend a torturous affair doesn't work if the humor that it's supposed to generate doesn't materialize. Watching becomes as big a slog for the viewer as getting through that ill-advised camping trip is for the characters.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Goodman
    They won't make you double over laughing (or maybe they will--your mileage may vary when it comes to comedy). But what does work here is the effortless ease with which Mull, Grier, Lawrence and Jordan never miss a beat.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    Television's smartest--and easily one of its best--comedies, NBC's The Good Place, is set to return for its third twist-filled, morally complex season, and we're all better for it. ... The only show on television of any kind where you can get intellectually stimulating and abstract lessons on philosophy and morality while also laughing hysterically at made-up swear words and pop culture.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    Single Parents feels like a comedy that goes for simple snark and believes it's a little more clever than it really is, but then had a bunch of network notes stuck to it about softening those right angles.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    Mr Inbetween was nothing short of a stunning revelation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    Thoroughly (maddeningly?) vanilla in so many devious ways that even the font for the logo and the manipulatively easy theme song and background music feel like a kind of manufactured nostalgia to sedate the masses.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Your results may vary depending on how important it is to you to have mental illness, grief, unhappiness and other important Big Ideas fully explored via characters you come to love. This theory will be put to the test in the middle stretches of the 10-episode run of Maniac, where Fukunaga truly gets unleashed. It's there where aesthetics tend to win over sustained attention to the core issues of the series--but there's no denying that it's hard to look away from almost any portion of what's going on.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 10 Tim Goodman
    Norm Macdonald Has a Show, his new Netflix series, is pretty terrible. It's labor-intensive to get through. In the moments when it's disastrously bad, you wonder if that's the joke; given that Macdonald is notoriously adherent to anti-jokes and anti-stories as a conceit, it's at least a possibility. But no. ... Norm Macdonald Has a Show is a painful thing to watch.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Forever wants to be weird in places, mysterious too--and some but not all of that works, because Yang and Hubbard are biting into some big themes within the limited time frame of eight half-hour episodes. But the series is never uninteresting. It has ambition on many fronts. ... Forever is already a slice of something unique in a crowded TV landscape, with the allure of morphing into something bolder in future seasons.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    Homecoming is a visually dazzling thriller that plays on memory, the military industrial complex, conspiracy and unchecked government privilege to immediately set the hook as an intriguing, ambitious work of television.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    The Deuce, with its brilliant writing, immersive atmosphere and uncommonly excellent acting, is exploring 1977. The four episodes that HBO sent for review reflect a more personal and interesting storyline for Gyllenhaal's Candy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    Showtime's best and most binge-worthy series in a long time. ... The result is funny, wildly inventive and utterly sad. To pull off what is conceptually the implosion of Mister Rogers is a real triumph.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Goodman
    There's not enough good writing here, not enough motivation to follow characters that are either intentionally half-baked or are merely uninteresting. Characters have quirks but the quirks prove there's not much else there. Smart people eventually do exceptionally dumb things. The early trends are not good.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    In no way does it lose the sublime sauce that lubricates everything here--how movies and movie-making, or just the allure of Hollywood, capture the imagination of those outside that world while warping those within it. That's where the best comedy comes from in Get Shorty and there's no letting up on that element in the early going of season two.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Tim Goodman
    Insatiable is trite, way over the top (even for a series that appears to be trying to go there for comedic effect), unfunny and, running at 40-plus minutes per episode, a bloated mess that's labor-intensive to get through.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    The transmutation of Jimmy to Saul (and don’t forget Gene and his season-starting cameos) is likely to produce the best balance of darkness and humor that the series has mustered, if for nothing else than there's a gleeful appreciation on the part of the audience for Saul's shenanigans; their rising occurrence will be amusing while, at the same time, watching the exacting toll it took on Jimmy to get there will be distressing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Lodge 49 is a lovely little show, wonderfully written with a deep, capable cast (David Pasquesi is another standout) and a welcome sense of quirky optimism and dark humor. It uses Long Beach and the ocean itself as characters; it confronts age, philosophy, dreams (both failed and yet to be realized), capitalism, hope and whimsy in ways that few series tackle.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Sacred Games has enough going for it to be considered a strong start. And for those who haven't sampled the impressive depth on Netflix's international TV series bench, Sacred Games provides the kind of intriguing thrills found in the best of those offerings--a worldly mise-en-scene that depicts something familiar but with unique local twists.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Luckily for GLOW, there's just something about the series that made it immensely enjoyable even when it wasn't firing on all cylinders or reaching its fullest potential. That's a real achievement and a testament to how engaging the cast was even in limited minutes. ... It's a testament to them [the cast] that what viewers do get is more than enough to keep watching and not giving up.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Goodman
    One of the tightest and brightest and most sublime miniseries--running at a meager three hours, one hour per episode--that you're likely to see on television in 2018. ... Grant's performance is a tour-de-force. ... Whishaw is also fantastic in bringing multiple shades to his portrayal.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    A big, sprawling mess ... Yellowstone tries to be so expansive and soap-operatic that there's barely any realism in it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Goodman
    Even amid the mad scramble to re-establish plotlines, there are plenty of funny callbacks. ... Luckily, by the third episode of the new season, the cylinders are firing a lot more effortlessly, and the series benefits from having the cast pretty much all back together for shared scenes. Episodes five, six and seven show Arrested Development at its best, taking a full sprint at ridiculously elaborate scenarios.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Goodman
    Motherland has too many parenting cliches to overcome, despite some funny parts. Nearly all of it is too forced, too set up, too predictable. Parents or not, your time is better spent on Catastrophe.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Goodman
    Two of five episodes is not ideal to judge where the miniseries ends up, but there's absolutely no denying that the writing, directing and especially Cumberbatch will make you want to return each week. For such a bleak story, that's quite an achievement.

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