Todd Gilchrist

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For 76 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 77% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 22% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Todd Gilchrist's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Dark Knight Rises
Lowest review score: 20 Leatherface
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 56 out of 76
  2. Negative: 3 out of 76
76 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 92 Todd Gilchrist
    The Go-Go’s tackles the seminal all-female ’80s rock band with such honesty, openness and effervescence that it not only rises above that clichéd, almost telegraphed arc but transcends the ranks of other music documentaries to offer a story you desperately want to keep watching, even when you already know where it’s going.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 65 Todd Gilchrist
    Lost Girls is a story that works much better if you do a Google search before watching it, not after, since it offers a lot of convenient human truths, but not enough hard facts.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 65 Todd Gilchrist
    Tollman’s promise as a writer and director is evident, but not unlike his ambitious and untested protagonist, an editor might be what he needs most, whether or not he knows it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 85 Todd Gilchrist
    O’Connor’s work here behind the camera is equal to Affleck’s in front of it, as the two of them navigate this character’s complex minefield of shortcomings both earned and adopted, never letting him off the hook but attempting to explore and understand how and why these destructive patterns of behavior settle into rhythm.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Todd Gilchrist
    Funny and honest in equal measures, like a good stand-up routine, Standing Up, Falling Down uses a light touch to teach us there’s always more to learn.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 65 Todd Gilchrist
    Ultimately, “Viral” feels like the sequel or second season in a series where a first (or at the very least, a recap) would have been helpful. As a topic of tremendous ongoing importance with roots that desperately need exploration, anti-Semitism deserves, and needs, a look into its global impact and perpetuation that makes a deeper dive than this documentary provides.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 35 Todd Gilchrist
    The Grudge 2020 is a prestige drama sidelined by lackluster, incoherent horror, ruining the scares and undercutting the humanity of its characters.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 72 Todd Gilchrist
    American Dharma unfortunately brings its audience only to the brink of real discovery.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 65 Todd Gilchrist
    Harper’s is that rare movie that works much better when the characters are finding solutions and working together rather than falling into conflict and creating problems.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Todd Gilchrist
    Queen & Slim is convincingly and unapologetically multidimensional in its portrayal of its characters; as our perception of them shifts from one scene to the next, we realize they’re not ciphers for communities, cultures, arguments or belief systems, but individuals wrestling with who they are and how they present themselves to the world.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Todd Gilchrist
    For an artist who is committed (for better or worse) to always putting out the purest and most unfiltered portrait of who he is and what he believes, the main problem with documenting this particular moment in this way is that it goes by far too quickly, when it’s the first he’s created in a long time that has the potential to truly change hearts and minds — and best of all, not even solely about Kanye West himself.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 86 Todd Gilchrist
    Director and co-writer J.D. Dillard (“Sleight”) delivers a smart, streamlined thriller that skillfully integrates a careful whisper of social commentary into a story that also unfolds masterfully as a straightforward genre workout.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Todd Gilchrist
    It documents the unexpected timelessness underlying a hopelessly contemporary phenomenon by looking at the very specific ways the current generation of teenagers engage the world around them, pointing out the inevitable, inescapable sameness of the way the world always has, and will, look back.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 45 Todd Gilchrist
    No one has ever accused a Gerard Butler action movie of being too smart, but “Angel Has Fallen” operates on such a level of half-considered logic and improbable motivations that even moderately well-mounted action can’t distract audiences from how dumb it is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 78 Todd Gilchrist
    Roberts populates convincingly elaborate underwater sets with a suitably appealing cast for a claustrophobic adventure that manages to deliver some real terror before it somewhat inevitably levels up into absurdity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 72 Todd Gilchrist
    It will probably get the job done for casual jazz fans — after all, it features clips of some of the most incredible, enchanting and inspiring recordings ever made. Those already familiar with the genre may be disappointed to discover that it mostly sticks with the notes they know and very seldom ventures beyond.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Todd Gilchrist
    This particular “Bob Dylan Story” proves that at least in terms of the tour, and possibly Dylan himself, what’s on the surface is plenty fascinating no matter how much or little you get at anything underneath.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 85 Todd Gilchrist
    Howard’s film is a love letter to the icon, but ultimately Pavarotti is a more of a celebration of the individual behind that façade and a reminder that it’s as much his humanity as his talent that made him a star.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 82 Todd Gilchrist
    Even if Echo in the Canyon feels slightly anemic at 85 minutes or so, there are worse ways to revisit this epochal artistic moment than via Andrew Slater’s affectionate, intimate documentary.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Todd Gilchrist
    Quirky, tender and hopeful, “The Tomorrow Man” doesn’t necessarily depict a romance or relationship that everyone will immediately relate to, but Jones’ kindness and generosity as a storyteller encourages his audience to treat these characters empathetically.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Todd Gilchrist
    Long Day’s Journey Into Night is a mesmerizing hallucination of a film, a journey through one man’s memories for a truth that may not exist.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Todd Gilchrist
    Dragged Across Concrete is not a terrible movie, but it’s not so good that Zahler shouldn’t get dragged for it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Todd Gilchrist
    The Kid simultaneously wants to humanize and mythologize its cowboys — and neither effort works.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 85 Todd Gilchrist
    Paddleton is quietly funny and full of compassion — the kind of movie that, much like its characters, feels likely to get overlooked or ignored but proves surprisingly rewarding once you make the effort to look past its surface.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 87 Todd Gilchrist
    Klayman, an increasingly skilled observer as a documentarian, occasionally succumbs to her own curiosity, or maybe incredulity, to ask him a question about these comments, or positions, but mostly, her quiet, unobtrusive gaze exposes his flaws without requiring interjection.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Todd Gilchrist
    Ultimately, American Chaos isn’t bad, it’s just kind of too late to do any real good.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 85 Todd Gilchrist
    It’s Merritt’s devastatingly authentic turn as a kid propelled by good intentions and naïve ambition to scuttle his own life in order to create a better one for his family that makes Demange’s follow-up to the critically-acclaimed “’71” a frequently indelible cinematic experience, charged with unique energy and impact even when its premise is overly familiar.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 45 Todd Gilchrist
    Peppermint ultimately possesses the stale predictability of an unwrapped candy discovered at the bottom of a purse.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 45 Todd Gilchrist
    Kin
    It never feels complete or thought through enough, either as a story or more crucially, an emotional experience — which is exactly what audiences would need in order to want to see more.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 86 Todd Gilchrist
    What ultimately works most profoundly for the film is that its intimacy, its specificity, feels less like the culmination of Joan’s life experiences and more like an epiphany, or maybe an origin story, for what’s yet to come from her.

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