Tom Huddleston

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For 338 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tom Huddleston's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Eraserhead
Lowest review score: 20 Rings
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 338
338 movie reviews
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It’s the most haunted and dreamlike of all American films, a gothic backwoods ramble with the Devil at its heels.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    What 12 Years a Slave is really interested in is creating an honest, believable experience: in culture and context, place and people, soil and skin. The result can, at times, be alienating.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This isn’t just the best-looking film of the year, it’s one of the most awe-inspiring achievements in the history of special-effects cinema. So it’s a shame that – as is so often the case with groundbreaking effects movies – the emotional content can’t quite match up to the visual.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    Forty years on, Taxi Driver remains almost impossibly perfect: it’s hard to think of another film that creates and sustains such a unique, evocative tone, of dread blended with pity, loathing, savage humour and a scuzzy edge of New York cool.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    As befits both its tortuous hand-to-mouth genesis and the devastating conflict it reflects, this is a film of pure sensation, dazzling audiences with light and noise, laying bare the stark horror – and unimaginable thrill – of combat. And therein lies the true heart of darkness: if war is hell and heaven intertwined, where does morality fit in? And, in the final apocalyptic analysis, will any of it matter?
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It’s one of the most insightful films ever made about the British class system.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    Jennifer Peedom’s film is stunningly photographed (how could it not be?) and brilliantly sly: she gives the tour guides and their rich, self-absorbed charges just enough rope to hang themselves, and they duly oblige. But it’s also a heartfelt tribute to the resilience of a people.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    The scene where Sam imparts his wisdom to young buck Bottoms may be the saddest, loveliest moment in 1970s American cinema. And that’s saying something.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It may lack the authority-baiting, satire-with-a-purpose edge of Life of Brian, but Holy Grail is the looser, sillier, ultimately funnier film, packed with actual goofy laughs rather than hey-I-get-that cleverness.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    A film steeped in psychological realism, its rigorously compact plotting and stark, noir-influenced photography perfectly complementing the mounting sense of clammy, metaphysical dread.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Ida
    Pawlikowski’s film may be bleak and unforgiving, but it’s also richly sympathetic and deeply moving.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    [A] calm, reflective, gorgeously uneventful slice of nostalgic romance.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    This is quite simply one of the saddest movies ever made, a tale of loss, grief and absolute loneliness, an unflinching stare into the darkest moral abyss.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    This is a story of identity, and the lack of it. And it’s fascinating.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    A film with a fistful of memorable moments—most of them involving Bridges hurling insults at people—but not a great deal new to say.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    Eraserhead is a singular work of the imagination, a harrowing, heartbreaking plunge into the darkest recesses of the soul.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    We Are the Best! is a joyous celebration of youth, friendship and rebellion, and if there’s a nagging note of regret and bitterness it never manages to undermine the overwhelmingly compassionate tone.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    There aren't many films we'd describe as perfect, but Robert Zemeckis's oh-so-'80s time travel tale fits the bill.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    Best of all is Steven Spielberg’s direction: the camera moves like a predatory animal, gliding eerily across the surface of the vast Atlantic, creating sequences of almost unbearable suspense.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This isn’t quite tense or funny enough to become the masterpiece some Hawks lovers claim. But it is smart, incisive and often very funny.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    It’s a film of stark, superbly judged and beautifully sustained contrasts, the soundtrack hopping confidently from Tammy Wynette to Chopin as Bobby and his waitress girlfriend Rayette (Karen Black) travel from the lusty, sun-baked south to the cerebral, rainswept north to pay final respects to Bobby’s dying father.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    These young women have already witnessed enough horror to last a lifetime, and in this unforgiving society their lot seems unlikely to improve. A grim but necessary watch.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    De Palma’s grasp on King’s material is never in doubt: this is a truly throat-grabbing horror movie, sporting a handful of pitch-perfect set-pieces, not to mention one of the few examples of effective split-screen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    Kore-eda’s insight is so unflinching, his affection for his characters so intimate and sure, that not a moment here feels wasted.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    It doesn’t all work: The pace can feel a little slow, and there are points where Park tries to have his tasty feminist cake and eat it too. But mostly, this is smart, sumptuous and wonderfully indulgent.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    This is a provocative, intelligent movie for those with a strong emotional constitution.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    From the slam-bang direction to the relentless pace to the not-a-word-wasted dialogue and even the driving synth score, everything else about The Terminator just works.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Tom Huddleston
    The supporting cast is flawless, with a special mention owed to Brad Dourif as poor, doomed Billy Bibbit. But the script lacks the woozy, otherworldly subtlety of Kesey’s book, relying instead on pop psychology and finger-pointing: once again, it turns out women are to blame for pretty much everything.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Huddleston
    As a story about how hard it is to make your own way in the world, Kiki’s Delivery Service is truthful and scalpel-sharp. That it manages all this while remaining consistently funny, optimistic and exciting – even for little ones – is a mark of Miyazaki’s genius.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Tom Huddleston
    The LEGO Movie is sheer joy: the script is witty, the satire surprisingly pointed and the animation tactile and imaginative.

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