For 187 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tom Keogh's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Almost Famous
Lowest review score: 0 3000 Miles to Graceland
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 38 out of 187
187 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Tom Keogh
    There’s a lot of exposition involved in making all this palace intrigue clear. But Zhang balances the talky sections with breathtaking outdoor scenes. Zhang’s trademark, preternaturally balletic fight sequences also do not disappoint.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Tom Keogh
    The basics of Draper’s story hold promise, but the film derails because Jack and Oliver just aren’t charming as social pariahs.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    The unusual but revealing documentary Matangi / Maya / M.I.A., a hodgepodge of old video diaries, music videos, performances and interviews spanning decades, reflects M.I.A.’s passionate efforts to enlighten fans about victims of government oppression — while also getting people around the world dancing to her music.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Tom Keogh
    Cooke presents a case that the war on drugs in America is not only a no-win scenario, it is no longer (if it ever was) designed to be won as much as fulfill disturbing, narrow agendas in the public and private sectors.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    Perhaps in an effort to tell a PG story about an all-ages storyteller, Te Ata lacks vitality, pulling its punches and sometimes resorting to a cheesy shorthand. (A scene featuring Greene’s reservation leader and a racist senator is especially cheap.) Despite that, Te Ata lingers in the memory as a tale of an artist’s promise — and fulfillment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    There’s plenty here to enjoy.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    Bell can sculpt a funny moment to polished realization, but deprive it of oxygen at the same time. It’s not until late in the film’s third act that a different feeling emerges, a looser hand that provides room for characters to be more warm and human than pieces in a constricted design.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Keogh
    Ripped works best as a middling series of gags about being far too many tokes over the line.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    In more careless hands, Middle Man’s deranged farce could have resulted in an unchecked, undisciplined movie with nothing to say. But beneath the roller-coaster madness here is an earthbound terror that art is meant to reveal.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Tom Keogh
    A riveting and illuminating documentary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 38 Tom Keogh
    That’s a lot for a viewer to take in, and as pleasing as some aspects of Your Name can be, there’s no question Shinkai’s overstuffed movie often trips over itself.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    For Here or to Go? offers an insightful group portrait but lacks imagination in a romantic subplot and (except for a requisite Bollywood-style dance number) is visually dreary.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Tom Keogh
    Despite the stakes, Mendeluk can’t scare up any particular urgency, largely because everything is so contrived and inauthentic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    You feel hints of a strange energy in Emily that remind us we don’t always know why we do what we do in relationships. The hard part is holding on for the ride.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    Driver’s performance as an uncertain man getting through the day-to-day prosaic, quietly buoyed by passion and artistic commitment, is exquisite.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    What follows is a post-setup hour of imaginative action and dazzling stunt work, all taking place on one of cinema’s great self-metaphors: a speeding train changing scenes every few seconds and heading toward an unknown destination.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    Within this uncertain world, Lopéz-Gallego relishes such noir staples as fatalistic shadows, eruptive mayhem and terse, ironic dialogue. But he and his cinematographer, Jose David Montero, also carve out fresh visual territory.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Keogh
    The script by Liu Zhenyun becomes ponderous and redundant, kept on oxygen by its lead actress’s complex performance as a child-woman with enigmatic wisdom.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Tom Keogh
    The Charnel House is watchable, even if you can tell very soon what’s really going on behind mysterious doings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    So compelling is writer-director Joel Potrykus’ unnerving scenario — with its largely ambiguous tone of horror dramatically offset at times by explicit frights — that a viewer isn’t necessarily bothered by a lack of basic story information about who, what, when, where and why.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Keogh
    The film’s bleached colors and Reeves’ trademark woodenness add to its emotional remoteness, though Basso, Zellweger and Belushi create a convincing family in crisis. Zellweger, especially, delivers a fascinating, complex performance as a damaged survivor.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    With its boyhood-to-manhood tropes (growing up means getting a girl’s attention and winning an idol’s respect), London Town can’t be taken too seriously. But it’s nice to see part of the Clash’s populist legacy in a fan’s journey.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    The film distinguishes itself by what it lacks: simple, unrealistic answers to Perry’s regrets and the hole in his soul. His path to authenticity might not lead back to glory days, but contentment is closer than he thinks.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    The best material gives the excellent Scott and Kroll plenty of love-hate energy: Robbie’s condescension, Bill’s passive-aggressiveness. It will look all too familiar to anyone who isn’t an only child.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    A number of Kelly’s scenes play out like stand-alone sketches — some quite funny; not all of them essential — rather than parts of a whole. But that’s easily forgiven considering the candor of his insights and his strong cast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    Brother Nature at least enjoys moments of deep-end mania from Killam and Moynihan.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    Co-writer and director Lars Kraume brings muted colors and a claustrophobic, urgent energy to the procedural part of this story, while reminding us that not every moral hero looks like Captain America — in fact, like Bauer, they can be a rumpled, misanthropic mess.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Keogh
    A harrowing spectacle that makes one forget to breathe.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Tom Keogh
    Miike misses an opportunity to add even more resonance by telling us a little extra about each of the samurai fighting the good fight. But he's also busy shooting nearly an hour's worth of complicated fight choreography. Enthralling as that is, Miike's greatest achievement here is in giving us reason to deeply care.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Keogh
    Director John H. Lee keeps the action taut and often deeply felt when it comes to sacrifices and losses. But the script is often bogged down by deifying MacArthur.

Top Trailers