For 364 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tom Russo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Richard III
Lowest review score: 25 The Oath
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 52 out of 364
364 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The title might trumpet Harley Quinn’s emancipation, but she again feels like a character trapped in a movie that’s mediocre at best.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    It’s a diverting if slightly undercooked throwback that could offer more genuine intrigue, but that’s still worth it to see the cast gamely chuck out the window manners and vanity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    If there’s any way that Roach slips back into a creative pigeonhole, it’s by being overly keen on sticking his actors in prosthetic makeup. Richard Kind’s Rudy Giuliani, for one, elicits an unintended chuckle. And while Theron’s makeover is, again, uncanny, Kidman’s cleft chin is needlessly distracting. We’d buy her performance without it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Middling cop thriller, whose attention-grabbing city-on-lockdown premise is undercut by thin plotting and forced performances from the supporting cast.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    What’s most entertaining here, ultimately, is the performance that Stewart turns in as outspoken, play-it-loose Sabina, a completely unexpected, who-knew mash-up of sexy and offbeat.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Not surprisingly, Doctor Sleep splits the difference, dutifully attempting to honor both King’s writing and Kubrick’s film simultaneously. The movie actually manages to pull it off for a time, until in the last act revisited concepts start to play more like ill-advised retreads.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    What we’re left with, then, is yet another “Terminator” far easier to appreciate for isolated bits of inspiration than for any stroke of genius it manages overall.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    This franchise might be all about shedding light on lost details, but “Mistress of Evil” sometimes leaves us in the dark.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Pattinson and Dafoe dig into their roles, all right, with both actors crazily, mesmerizingly toggling from workaday to recriminating to maniacal and on and on. Together with Eggers they deliver a masterful study of souls trapped on a rock alone, but also trapped together, with all the twisty complexities involved.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The filmmakers and a nifty cast give the characters some clever, amusing flourishes — it’s definitely diverting seeing the Addamses rendered in state-of-the-art animation, given their cartoon origins — but it ultimately isn’t enough to keep the mood from turning dull.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    It’s a deep-thinking character study that’s provocatively if imperfectly presented — at least until the story devolves right along with its subject’s state of mind.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Yes, as it turns out — not only is Abominable as amusing as the competition, it boasts a lyricism and sweetness uniquely, sublimely its own.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Tom Russo
    The biggest narrative justification for “Downton” getting feature treatment might be the sweeping quality to all the character developments and showcase moments being juggled here. The intricacy is managed without ever playing like Fellowes took a couple of routine postscript episodes and simply stitched them together.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    The character-isolating bits furnish us with immolating heroines and dread-laden glimpses of Pennywise unmasked — you know, stuff to fill the quiet moments between arachnophobe nightmares and a predatory scene even more perverse than the saga-opening storm-drain vignette.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    For all of its engaging performances, this thoughtful yarn from the filmmaking tandem of Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz is limited by a quaintly straightforward story line. Every choice the characters opt for, every bit of self-discovery they make, is as scripted as a rasslin’ baddie’s folding-chair cheap shot.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Unless you’re familiar with the various particulars, you’ll likely find yourself experiencing the film in aptly wavelike fashion, cresting with optimism about the crew’s prospects before plunging into apprehension, again and again.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Ma
    This time, the over-the-top craziness that Spencer slyly serves up fills more than just a pie plate.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    You’ll just have to look to your own effects-jazzed inner child to find a kid who’s relatable here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Compared to a second installment that expanded the established Keanuscape in ways the “Matrix” sequels only wish they had, “Wick 3” fumbles for compelling, organically incorporated territory to explore.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Tom Russo
    In the end, the movie leaves us stuck with unmoving drama and increasingly numbing carnage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    One quibble: For such a legendarily elusive spot, the snowmen’s Himalayan hideaway seems awfully well trodden these days. If you thought the similarity between, say, “Coco” and “The Book of Life” was a case of animators not looking resourcefully enough for inspiration, how about the trifecta of “Smallfoot,” “Missing Link,” and DreamWorks’s upcoming “Abominable”?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Shazam! is pretty entertaining. It’s a lark that aims to distinguish itself from too-familiar DC dourness a bit like “Guardians of the Galaxy” playfully tweaked Marvel’s formula.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Maras and his cast craft such a chilling, narratively grueling dramatization of the episode — chaos worsened by the lack of tactical response forces in Mumbai — it’s tough to view quietly-played everyman heroics as the story’s takeaway. These striving unfortunates are just too hopelessly, fatally overmatched for that. Audiences are likelier to leave horrified or, at best, numb.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    It’s the mark of many a standout sports movie that you don’t necessarily have to be a fan to enjoy the story. The real-life pro wrestling portrait Fighting With My Family is a hugely entertaining case in point.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    For all of Alita’s she-Pinocchio charm — and her Cameronian estrogen-charged badass-itude — she can’t quite carry the audience all the way across that pesky uncanny valley.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    An unexpected portrait of the legendary comedy duo on a mostly forgotten stage tour at the twilight of their careers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Aquaman’s first glimpse of Atlantis is meant to convey wonder, but mostly there’s a sense of digitally over-busy déjà vu, as we’re reminded of more inventively designed fantasyscapes in “Thor,” “Avatar” and so on.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    After a point, we’re left wondering whether we’re watching a character study or caricature. Either way, the portrait gradually morphs from intriguing to tedious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    At its best moments, Creed II manages a feat nearly as striking as anything that Michael B. Jordan’s Rocky Balboa protégé pulls off in the boxing ring: It doesn’t play all that much like a sequel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Tom Russo
    The imaginative, touching, and dizzyingly animated Ralph Breaks the Internet is a sequel with a rich, broad vision that addresses all of these issues faster than you can say Fix-It Felix.

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