Tomris Laffly

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For 189 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tomris Laffly's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Eighth Grade
Lowest review score: 0 Roe v. Wade
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 189
189 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Kovgan’s ode to choreography master Merce Cunningham is sensational in every sense of the word. Renewing one’s appreciation of the many wonders of the human body and the space in which it fills and drifts, Cunningham celebrates all the things our joints and flexed muscles are capable of, as seen through the mind and poetic dances of an iconic creator.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    It's a bold, significant piece of work: an investigative thriller with a grave finale that stuns you into silence, then, hopefully, something more.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    A richly textured masterpiece, Roma is cinema at its purest and most human.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    The understated film builds into a gut punch that’s more painful than anything in the superficial, recent Roger Ailes exposé "Bombshell."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Easily among this year’s finest films and laced with an unapologetic social message, Happy As Lazzaro dares one to imagine a reality where each individual would task themselves to be as selfless and morally whole as its main protagonist. If only.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    An aching film on such exquisite pains of impossible love, Paweł Pawlikowski’s Cold War concurrently swells your heart and breaks it, just like the sore memory of a lover that drifted away from your life, or an intensely craved kiss that never was.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    A terrifically juicy, apocalyptic cinematic sacrament that dances around a fruitless relationship in dizzying circles. We are not stuffed inside a cavernous house of horrors this time around. But be prepared to feel equally suffocated by a ravenous family (albeit, a chosen, cultish kind) all the same.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    A devastating scrapbook and a confessional journal of sorts. It’s also a personal cinematic endeavor as opposed to a historical crash course in the vein of “Cries From Syria,” another superb documentary on the subject, but one with different ambitions.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    It’s a delicate drama that flourishes through the liberating power of art, where a hopeful yet consuming love affair sparks between two young women amid patriarchal customs, and stays concealed in their hearts both because of and in spite of it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Lush melodramas are a dying breed, especially masterful ones like Karim Aïnouz’s Invisible Life that wear Douglas Sirkian genre conventions on their sleeve proudly and abundantly.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Little Women solidifies Gerwig’s one-of-a-kind voice on the page and behind the camera, opening up the classic in a blissful and innovative screen adaptation that feels ageless and vastly of today.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Moss continues to deliver what we crave from woman characters: the kind of messy yet sturdy intricacy many of today’s thinly conceived you-go-girl female superheroes continue to lack.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Sylvie’s Love feels downright rebellious, daring to exist with its unapologetic old-fashioned quality at a time when many maddeningly seem to dismiss honest-to-god romances and proud women’s pictures as slight and outdated.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    This is an astonishing filmmaking debut from Burnham, a renowned comedian as well as a musician—you might secretly wonder how a young male not only captured the point of view of an eighth-grade girl so exactly, but also expressed it with such emotional precision. Whatever the secret formula to his experiential accuracy and unexpectedly inventive directorial eye is, the outcome is a deeply serious coming-of-age film that is only light and charming on the surface.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    A giant leap even for the youngest-ever Best Director victor, Damien Chazelle’s technically astonishing First Man is a poetic non-blockbuster of claustrophobic intimacy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Tomris Laffly
    A film of mounting artistic imagination, Sorry to Bother You spirals into a type of mind-bending madness that is both persistently fun and one-of-a-kind.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Tomris Laffly
    This is both an immensely humanist film, and a tough, heartbreaking watch.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Tomris Laffly
    It’s an endless metamorphosis that unfolds like some kind of real-time art installation, and in all honesty, it can be a touch overwhelming to take in at times — which is why the digital release of The Wolf House is a blessing in disguise, as audiences can rewind to fully appreciate this awe-inspiring film’s layers of details.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Tomris Laffly
    Throughout the mostly wordless “Stray,” we wonder with compassion and considerable self-critique whom the society uplifts and supports vs. whom it chooses to disregard and deem invisible.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    The Children Act is perhaps a bit stilted in the overt way it sometimes attempts to spell out its arguments. But director Richard Eyre’s film still poses sophisticated questions around family, religion, marriage, law and the delicate boundaries that can or cannot be crossed in each institution.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    Even if this unique absurdist has not exactly been your cup of tea previously, he might finally win you over with this deliciously “Dangerous Liaisons”-esque and thoroughly female-driven period film, co-written by Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    There is an undeniable neorealist quality to Labaki’s work, bringing to mind not only the first half of Garth Davis’ "Lion," but also the likes of Vittorio De Sica’s "Shoeshine" and Sean Baker’s "The Florida Project" (even though it falls short of the artistic command of these titles).
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    Throughout its majestic 188-minute running time, there is a profound sum of self-negotiation in Turkish auteur Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s The Wild Pear Tree; a slow-burning and unexpectedly humorous character study as reflective and impenetrable as anything in Ceylan’s filmography.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    A thoughtful and dynamic blend of genres, Benedikt Erlingsson’s contemporary environmental fable Woman At War continually thrills with a side of laughs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    Panahi can’t help but flaunt optimism wherever he sees it — he lets it rise above it all despite the odds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    The Mustang becomes an emotional powerhouse in its final act.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    Compared to the inherent compactness of “Dior and I” that crystallizes Dior’s collective craft and process under its new creative director Raf Simons, Halston is vast, and therefore, less of a thrill to watch than the real-life “Project Runway” challenge thrown at Simons. But it will be no less breathtaking for fashion enthusiasts, and anyone dwelling in the tricky intersection of art, history and commerce.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    With weighty things to say about contemporary and corrupt institutions of power and even dangers of male hegemony, Michôd’s non-preachy The King comes with philosophical heft and visual authority to match.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    Expect to be moved to tears during this reflective film as clear-eyed as Souza’s photo books, reliving the memories of dignity that once piloted the country and often pondering, “How could we have gone from this to Trump?”
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    July’s best and most mature work to date, the often hilarious and gradually heartbreaking Kajillionaire.

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