Tricia Olszewski

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For 51 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tricia Olszewski's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Weiner
Lowest review score: 20 Careful What You Wish For
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 51
  2. Negative: 4 out of 51
51 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 65 Tricia Olszewski
    Miloni and Rafi’s shy romance becomes sweet because of, not despite, the languid pace of its development.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Tricia Olszewski
    The film is a clunky and at times ridiculous affair, taking a situation that might reasonably happen and turning it into something melodramatic and ultimately unbelievable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Tricia Olszewski
    Shot in black and white and set mostly in a retail environment, the French-Canadian film gives off a “Clerks” vibe as the trio of protagonists slack off, bitch about pay, and talk about life and love.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Tricia Olszewski
    A thriller without thrills is merely a drama, and The Wedding Guest is a dull drama at that.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Tricia Olszewski
    Homelessness among military veterans is a noble subject for a filmmaker to take on. So it deserves a better vehicle than Sgt. Will Gardner, writer-director Max Martini’s clumsy and sometimes downright laughable portrayal of an injured Iraq war vet.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Tricia Olszewski
    With zero romance and nonsensical thrills, the only legitimate theft here is of the viewer’s time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Tricia Olszewski
    Conroy wrote the book upon which the film is based and serves as the film’s central mouthpiece; full of twitchy, animated energy, he makes a terrific storyteller who’s boosted by Martin’s selection of found footage along with a minimum of jangly re-creations.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Tricia Olszewski
    Chomko doesn’t drag on a scene longer than it should be; there’s an expediency to her storytelling that gets the point across without the film feeling rushed. It’s blunt and bold, just like its characters.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 85 Tricia Olszewski
    [A] charming romantic comedy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Tricia Olszewski
    Though it’s fun to watch Pullman and Huston sparring, it’s nearly as pleasant to watch their characters make up.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Tricia Olszewski
    The couple’s talk about dreams deferred is too knee-jerk to warrant sympathy. And though a lot of quiet in between their squabbling is sometimes a relief, it ultimately points to an underdeveloped script that suggests it’s more profound than it is. These two are a little too comfortable with silences.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Tricia Olszewski
    Crime + Punishment is essential viewing for anyone with a suspicion that there’s corruption in law enforcement.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Tricia Olszewski
    Generation Wealth is ultimately a string of subjects in search of a binder. And the director’s interests don’t count.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 85 Tricia Olszewski
    Cummings may have taken the easy way out here and there, but she largely delivers a film that kinda sorta makes you think, which isn’t a characteristic the genre is known for. Throughout, your feel-good chemicals will be flowing.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Tricia Olszewski
    You’ll be surprised to discover that it’s actually smartly written and expertly pulled off.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 55 Tricia Olszewski
    The finale, though a bit cheesy and decidedly telegraphed, is sweet and a welcome antidote to all the bare-skinned romping.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 35 Tricia Olszewski
    Even women will lose their man cards if they buy a ticket to Year by the Sea, a figurative and nearly retch-inducing celebration of the ovary based on a best-selling memoir by Joan Anderson.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Tricia Olszewski
    Heslov, making her debut, therefore largely does an impressive job balancing the contestants’ deeply disturbing stories...with the near giddiness they express while getting dolled up. It’s infectious.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 55 Tricia Olszewski
    Although the filmmakers return to outsize wackiness too frequently, the film mercifully isn’t one chaotic gag after another.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Tricia Olszewski
    In the end, human decency and resilience are this narrative’s common threads. And you needn’t have lost a loved one to recognize it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Tricia Olszewski
    Noxon, a TV veteran making her directorial debut here, had suffered from an eating disorder herself, as did the film’s star, Lily Collins. It’s surprising, then, that the script offers only generalities instead of any real insight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Tricia Olszewski
    The Bad Batch feels less like a coherent film and more like a pastiche.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Tricia Olszewski
    Although Bell herself is fascinating, Letters From Baghdad is less so.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Tricia Olszewski
    Shawkat breaks out subtleties that she’s never been able to show off in other roles.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Tricia Olszewski
    Tower himself contributes to the film’s appeal. Still elegant in his mid-70s, there’s no doubt of his arrogance, though that seems to be a prerequisite of the trade. He knows that his work has been extraordinary, he’s well-spoken, and he cares intensely about decorum and class.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 65 Tricia Olszewski
    Little Boxes has good intentions if not the subtlest delivery.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Tricia Olszewski
    Talk of accepting truths and moving on will knot your stomach; inevitably, you’ll reflect on your own station in life and weigh whether or not you feel like Ryota, who tells his son, “I’m not who I want to be yet.” And isn’t such evocation the point of all art? With this measure in mind, Kore-eda has created a masterpiece.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Tricia Olszewski
    Though the strong performances of Nélisse and Wiggins are key to convince you that they not only care for each other but are capable of thinking on their feet, it’s Paxton who must deliver sufficient menace to propel the story — and he’s terrifying.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Tricia Olszewski
    The most impressive aspect of James Franco’s In Dubious Battle is, by far, its cast.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 85 Tricia Olszewski
    Franco’s fantastic here. He gives a fieriness to Michael as a gay advocate, then seamlessly slides into borderline madness as he starts accepting that the “voice” he hears is God’s. Michael’s confusion is palpable and intense.

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