For 92 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wes Greene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 88 La Última Película
Lowest review score: 12 Happy Birthday
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 53 out of 92
  2. Negative: 18 out of 92
92 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    It’s an unfussy, intimate chamber drama that’s fearless in confronting the attitudes of its exalted subject.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    It's less of an insightful backstage documentary than a gushing, sycophantic love letter to the late Merce Cunningham.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Wes Greene
    Brie Larson’s directorial debut is nothing so much as a series of quirks.
    • 8 Metascore
    • 25 Wes Greene
    In a film that features Charles Manson and his disciples, there’s something unsavory about presenting Sharon Tate as one of the crazy ones.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Writer-director Yeo Siew Hua suggests that becoming another person is as easy as dreaming it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    The title Weightless is an apt description for this stylish but emotionally inert film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Wes Greene
    This a much leaner film in terms of narrative incident than In the Family, though it paves the way for Patrick Wang to step into new artistic terrain.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    What They Had gracefully coasts on its patient observations of one family’s dynamics, but once the third act hits, Elizabeth Chomko goes about neatly tidying up seemingly every loose end.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    Right out of the gate, the film only sees a kind of blunt irony in this blurring of her public and private selves.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    The unflashy, austere visual style of the film is but a veneer over writer-director Susanna Nicchiarelli's deceptively radical treatment of the musical biopic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    Daniel Peddle's film emphasizes, for better and worse, the crushing monotony of living in insolated parts of the Deep South.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The impressionistic tenor of the unabashedly energetic final sequences is so wondrous that you may wish that writer-director Peter Livolsi had utilized it as The House of Tomorrow's guiding principle.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Courtney Moorehead Balaker's film is mostly a sobering dramatization of a true and controversial story in recent Connecticut history.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    After a certain point, Olivia Newman's film treats the womanhood of its main character as an afterthought.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    Cédric Klapisch correlates wine’s complex arrangement of flavors to the complexity of memory itself, which, it should be said, is the most nuanced of the filmmaker’s wine metaphors.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Wes Greene
    The potential comic absurdities of the premise are squandered as soon as the film settles into a tepid coming-of-age tale.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The film displays a sprightly tone and blissful sense of liberation in charting the exploits of characters seeking to live by their own feminine-centric rules.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    The film's pale-hued, Flash-like animation is abundant in detailed backgrounds that make the characters stand out like placards, allowing for Jian's critique of modern China to land with maximum force.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    Laurie Simmons isn’t so much creating art as a means to explore cinema’s effect on identity as she is conducting an act of indulgence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The film's hopscotching-in-time structure, informed by specific remembrances of Chavela Vargas's life, is refreshingly unconventional.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Wes Greene
    Given all its clumsily executed genre detours and tonal fluctuations, Rebecca Zlutowski’s film suggests an amateur juggling act.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Amnesia ultimately delivers rich insights about its main characters’ relationship to their backgrounds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    At its most honest, the film wrestles with the reluctance or unwillingness of women to fulfill ostensibly requisite roles.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    The film plays like one of the Grateful Dead's seminal concerts: protracted and digressive, yet intricate in its design.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Wes Greene
    The film's default mode is to lazily skewer suburbanites as cartoonishly privileged yuppies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Throughout, the content and tenor of certain stories told by Mick Rock ambitiously inform the film’s style.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    The faces in Logan Sandler's film, like the landscapes of the paradise setting, only convey an empty sort of ambiguity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Kelly Daniela Norris and T.W. Pittman's film immediately announces itself as a modest triumph of world-building.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    The documentary advances its cause through an intimately diaristic depiction of hard work done well.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud's Seasons is a nature documentary that reveals itself as a story of tragic usurpation.

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