Wesley Morris

Select another critic »
For 1,871 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wesley Morris' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Taboo
Lowest review score: 0 Lost Souls
Score distribution:
1871 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Wesley Morris
    It’s all a mess of ideology and theology, of flowing robes, flying fists, karma, camp, cant and can’t: can’t act, can’t kick, can’t marshal any art.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Wesley Morris
    The only thing I want less than a thriller about a school shooting is a thriller whose other main character is the main character’s iPhone.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    No one tries for anything mightier than put-on dumbness because that’s the outer limit of where the acting, writing (by Jeff Buhler and Rebecca Hughes) and directing (by BJ McDonnell) can take this premise. It’s fun, nonetheless, to catalog everybody’s imperviousness to embarrassment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Wesley Morris
    If anything, The Automat seeks to burnish the mystique — it won’t be hijacked by social politics even if the company’s stance in such matters appeared to be the right one. The movie opts for a starry, top-down vantage.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Wesley Morris
    There’s something here. It’s just undercooked. The cinematic philosophy around these minimalist hallucinations comes down to whether the images ought to amount to anything, as they always do with Weerasethakul and almost always with Reygadas.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Wesley Morris
    Marry Me is a sad tale that’s too busy leaping from plot point to plot point for Lopez to express anything close to real. It tells a lot and shows nothing.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    On one hand, this is just cinema. On the other, there’s something about the way that the editing keeps time with the music, the way the talking is enhancing what’s onstage rather than upstaging it. In many of these passages, facts, gyration, jive and comedy are cut across one another yet in equilibrium. So, yeah: cinema, obviously. But also something that feels rarer: syncopation.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    It’s bad, the sort of bad that knows what it is — campy rather than camp. “Campy” is camp with a diploma and a martini. And “Christmas on the Square” is a drunk.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The King of Staten Island is one of those 10-block-radius life slices whose smallness and intimacy ought to be a virtue. But the movie seems afraid of itself.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Wesley Morris
    The Italian movie, which Paolo Virzì directed, had a marrow-deep instinct for class. There were higher costs. The people in it were stranger, with sharper angles; they were alive. This new movie, which Oren Moverman wrote, Marc Meyers directed and has parts for Liev Schreiber and Marisa Tomei, is a character study that hasn’t done its homework.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Wesley Morris
    There’s no way for Loach to have gone smaller. When the movie’s over, you have, indeed, witnessed a tragedy, just not the usual kind. Nobody dies. No one goes to prison (there is one police-station visit unlike any I’ve seen). But life: that’s the tragedy, what it takes to get by, what it takes be just a little bit happy — for one lousy meal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Wesley Morris
    Wilson has captured Swift at a convincing turning point, ready, perhaps, to say a lot more.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    Berman can’t quite juggle it all.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    The whole thing just makes me miss how horny and violent movies used to be. Here, all the violence is sex. Only, it’s not. It’s just winking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    I liked the deluge of visual information and personalities. The pictures, footage, biography, news and gossip are the opposite of a Halston dress — unruly, busy, fussed over. But they come at you with an energy that feels substantial. Knowing what to do with all of that material is its own kind of intelligence. Why overthink it? Or: why show us what you’ve overthought?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Wesley Morris
    The movie is warm, observant, mildly philosophical and deeply curious about the daily and inner lives of both the people and their four-legged assistants.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Wesley Morris
    All of that observation in Babylon amounts to something that still feels new. You’re looking at people who, in 1980 England, were, at last, being properly, seriously seen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Wesley Morris
    You can see what this movie is after, something cockeyed but sincere, something in the neighborhood of Paul Mazursky, Elaine May or Alexander Payne. But the writing and filmmaking (Snyder directed) just aren’t quick enough.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Wesley Morris
    More than half the reason I went to see this movie is because I miss “Fool’s Gold,” too. But that movie is 11 years old. And the days of low-stakes thingamabobs with some stars and even a little bit of writing are gone. Instead of a caper with Kate Hudson, McConaughey has got a mess written and directed by Steven Knight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Wesley Morris
    Fyre needs another layer. You can locate in it this national moment of brashness and effrontery.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Wesley Morris
    This is Jenny from the blah.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Wesley Morris
    It’s just two and a half years of — sorry, two and a half hours — of oceanic screen savers and hair that won’t stop undulating so we know when we’re underwater.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Wesley Morris
    Something feels off with von Trier’s sense of artistry now. Something feels stuck, like his head’s wound up lodged in his rear, which brings the movie closer to “The Human Centipede” than I would have thought. But this isn’t cinematic horror. It’s proctology.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Wesley Morris
    The more time Khaled’s camera takes to wend its way around Hassane’s suspended body, the more its caresses seem to match all the embracing and caressing Hassane’s friend does. And the more time the movie devotes to the parts of this one man’s body the more that care seems to stand in for a country’s neglected whole.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Wesley Morris
    It’s impressive that Alami can put all this across — romance, suspense and, in the moving final act, a kind of tragedy — and maintain the movie’s nimbleness. But he’s a natural storyteller.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    You get both the most lovely gaze a professional camera’s ever laid upon Aretha Franklin and some of the mightiest singing she’s ever laid on you. The woman practically eulogizes herself. Don’t bother with tissues. Bring a towel.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Wesley Morris
    Mr. Faraut’s impressionistic conflation of humor, wonder, horror and sympathy whisks this movie to the deluxe suite of the pleasure palace.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Wesley Morris
    Ms. Streep’s near total absence leaves a hole Cher is expected to fill. It’s too little, way too late, of course, and because it’s Cher, it’s also too much.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Wesley Morris
    Whitney is too funereal to be a party, too sad, strange and dismaying to cheer. Yet, in its grim, guilt-inducing way, the film works, even on the occasions when it’s working against itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Wesley Morris
    The trouble is that despite how earnest and committed Mr. Zahs appears to be, the story of what’s in the collection might be more be more fascinating than the man who’s collected it.

Top Trailers