For 407 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Willa Paskin's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 40 out of 407
407 tv reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    The documentary makes the compelling case that the idea of Spears as a woman unfit to take care of herself, as well as the late-aughts breakdown that got her into the conservatorship in the first place, are the end products of the leering and judgmental treatment she’s always faced. ... If I have one quibble with Framing Britney Spears, it’s that it inhabits the new, gentler celebrity culture a little too thoroughly. It glosses Spears purely as victim of our gross culture.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    Through the first three episodes, the Marvel mythology recedes even as it provides enough stakes and structure to keep the old-timey sitcom riffs from having to shoulder the series. Over the years there have been all sorts of attempts to bring back the laugh-track sitcom, but WandaVision is more successful than most of them (I know, knock me over with a feather) because it’s all icing on the cake—the cake actually being the grim and complex Marvel mythology and backstory.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    It’s TV chick lit, a rom-com in a foreign location where nothing bad ever happens and the cute protagonist gets laid a lot on her way to having it all. But the complicating thing about Emily in Paris—the best thing about it really, the thing that turns it from a trifle people enjoy into a curiosity they enjoy insulting—is how brittle its protagonist is.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    This is a highly professional endeavor, and there’s nothing (too) embarrassing happening here. The show’s self-seriousness leans toward the dull more than the ridiculous, although some ridiculousness would be more fun. It doesn’t help that Rock, who has described this as the best part he’s “ever, ever, ever” had, is in such single-mindedly dramatic mode that he does not bring any looseness or lightness to his role
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Willa Paskin
    The resulting character, swoony in love, a loyal if misguided friend, a competent administrator, a practitioner only of techniques she believes help, is more sympathetic, but also more banal. No longer a chilling avatar of implacable, self-satisfied state violence who needs no reason to exist other than that the system will always find people like her to keep running, Nurse Ratched is now just another poor, misunderstood antihero.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    Like Murphy and Rhimes, Green isn’t concerned that being too entertaining will somehow undermine the series’s capital T themes so much as make you invest in them, and, in the first five episodes, she’s more disciplined than either of them, to boot. Every installment contains its own near-stand-alone pulp fiction, a structure that grounds the show and reminded me a bit of another series full of repartee, monsters, and metaphor: Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Lovecraft Country has an extraordinary ability to wink and keep a straight face at the same time, to be fun and serious simultaneously.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Willa Paskin
    The episode started well. ... But the velocity was disrupted, increasingly frequently, with throws to NBCUniversal content. ... Where there had once been toothless rebellion, now there was eager compliance—even if the show had trained me to see insincerity floating in the air, like the afterimage from decade-old flash.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Willa Paskin
    What I’m really trying to tell you is that it’s good for you, instead of that it’s good. I May Destroy You, though, is fantastic, in ways that both do and do not have anything to do with its multivalent treatment of rape and trauma.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    As the show more or less transforms in flight, each episode becomes a more fitting showcase for Rhys, an actor who projects square decency even when he’s neither square nor decent. ... As Perry becomes his superhero-lawyer self, as he assembles his newly diverse supporting team, the detective show gives way to the more straightforward pleasures of a courtroom drama, where the system can work, even if it’s just barely, because there’s a lawyer to believe in.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Willa Paskin
    Space Force is unhelpfully sprawling, taking place on a vast base in the middle-of-nowhere New Mexico, with a sneakily huge cast. ... The show wants to be acid and cutting but there’s a streak of toothless gentleness that turns the whole thing, unwelcome as a dash of sweet cream in a jar of pickle juice. ... Space Force is not exactly embarrassing—everyone involved is too talented— but it is shockingly unfunny for a show made by people who are so talented.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    No one on BFF is tossing tables, but there is a dull kind of friction. ... The challenges are so overwrought and specific they deny the contestants the chance to do what is most satisfying, for them and us: make something truly inventive from a simple prompt. ... The Big Flower Fight isn’t as lulling as GBBO, but it’s not as jaunty, propulsive, or technically impressive as other competition shows either. Don’t get me wrong, it’s edible, but it’s someone else’s comfort food.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    [Normal People] is so faithful to the letter of the novel (Rooney co-wrote the first six scripts) that it winds up being different in spirit—swoonier, not that swoony is a bad thing. Despite the care and attendance to just about every scene, beat, and glance in the 266-page novel, it has become a proper knee-buckling romance, the sort of show that lodges in one’s mind as if it were filmed in soft focus.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Willa Paskin
    Mrs. America has zip to spare, bounding along on a ‘70s soundtrack, limning complex history, ideas, alliances, and personal dynamics with assuredness, tact, and insight. ... The concise episodes are more effective than the diffuse treatment the show gives Steinem, who is by far the most famous figure but who never comes quite into focus. ... Ullman, Paulson, and Martindale all stand out, but Blanchett most of all. She brings all of her tremendous skill to bear on Schlafly, with a level of precision that makes her ring as clear as a bell.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Willa Paskin
    It’s hardly a show. It’s a bunch of reality TV players in search of a drama. ... The Circle is a simulacrum of a reality show, which was itself a simulacrum of real life. I’m not saying it’s not telling us something important; I just couldn’t bear to watch.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    What it lacks in rom-com purity it makes up for in substance. I found myself rooting for the couple to stay together and also get the hell apart. It’s a buoyant, bingeable comedy that’s worth arguing about. Trust me when I say: It feels good enough.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Willa Paskin
    Bad television that’s striving to be great, that’s got ideas and style but sinks under the weight of its own oversize ambition—a sheep with a 50-pound weight tied to its forelegs and dropped in a river. ... Except in Devs, multiple versions of the same sheep inhabit multiple realities. It sinks like a stone in every single one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    High Fidelity has many charms. But it does also have a recurring dissonance, a bunch of vestigial generational and dude behaviors that make the record skip.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Willa Paskin
    Goop Lab’s six episodes generally skirt the most eyebrow-raising of Goop’s nonsense, while mixing up the far-out and the less so. ... Don’t let The Goop Lab’s other experts fool you. Paltrow is the most expert of all: Self-aware, self-actualized, self-improving, and beyond self-reproach, she’s what Goop is actually selling.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    The new version of Party of Five, which premieres on Freeform on Wednesday night, is a timely reinterpretation of the original, a remix with meaning. ... Sadder and more wrenching then the original. Unlike the Salingers, the Acostas are not awfully, simply without their parents. They are in an excruciating limbo.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    Colman intuits that Elizabeth, at the height of her powers and in the middle of a calm stretch, is content. The performance is both believable and emotionally astute: Elizabeth would be settled and comfortable. But this, along with the equilibrium in her marriage, snuffs out some of the little tension there used to be. ... That the show remains appealing through this relatively slow going is largely thanks to the more high-strung characters surrounding Elizabeth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    Stately and extremely boring.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    While it’s hard to imagine this Emily is introspective enough to be any kind of poet, let alone Emily Dickinson, the show is unassuming and charming, mixing things up to convey the jarring weirdness of being ahead of one’s time. I think it would be a hit on Netflix.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Willa Paskin
    Violent, grim, and exceptionally silly. It’s Bird Box meets Game of Thrones, but stupider.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    It’s not good, but it’s bad in an extremely satisfying (to me) way. Like The Newsroom and Smash before it, it is an earnest, mediocre, insider-y look at an insular entertainment world of extreme interest to New York media types.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    He’s packing a punch. Watchmen is a show that will be scoured for clues about yet-to-be-birthed fan theories, even as it’s an intrinsic provocation of the sorts of genre fans who were angered by Star Wars centering women and people of color, or outraged by the suggestion that certain superheroes, James Bond, or Hermione Granger might be black. It’s not just that Watchmen’s main character is a black woman, it’s how the new show reframes what came before it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Willa Paskin
    A baroquely yet dully overstuffed series that hides what makes it genuinely new for Murphy—the focus on a single character—in a familiar-for-him form: a histrionic teen melodrama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    [Transparent] finishes not with a whimper but a choreographed musical number titled “Joyocaust.” It’s the climax of a movie-length “Musicale Finale” that works its way through various stages of OK-ness to crescendo with something so enthusiastically, earnestly nuts it achieves a kind of transcendence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    For a show that is both thoughtful and appropriately cynical about Israeli intelligence services—the Mossad’s concern for the nation turns even its most effective and devoted citizens into expendable cogs—it is surprisingly gentle to Cohen, a gentleness that becomes indistinguishable from shallowness, a spoiled sort of kindness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Willa Paskin
    The series doesn’t minimize the internees’ hardships, even if it somewhat underplays them. But it’s also a little strange to see the only major piece of pop culture about Japanese-American incarceration imply that its characters have even scarier things to worry about.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    The new season is less funny than the first but more urgent.

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