For 370 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Willa Paskin's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Fleabag: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 34 out of 370
370 tv reviews
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Willa Paskin
    Fleabag Season 2, which I cannot recommend highly enough, is thrillingly deep, funny, and buoyant. ... The ending is hopeful, but, to my mind, a little rushed. What a joy, for my major complaint about a TV show to be that there is not enough of it—the opposite problem of basically every other show on television.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    [A] blandly decent first episode ... Momentum, the idea that we are hurtling toward some conclusion that will explain it all, has been so encoded into the Game of Thrones experience that in the absence of any forward motion, the show is … kind of dull.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    Fosse/Verdon is extremely watchable and totally fascinating. ... But it’s full of the shoddy and cruel compromises it purports to be about. It’s a show in which a grotesque man is made to seem less grotesque than he was, and a brilliant complicated woman seems less brilliant and complicated than she really was.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    A bunch of perfectly adequate episodes that range in quality from pretty OK to bad.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    Wherever Annie is at in accepting herself, she--and the show--is over misery, even as a way to amass sympathy or identification. The show also has a great supporting cast. ... But mostly the show has Bryant, who even when she’s playing self-obsessed--becoming a self-actualized human being may require a wee bit of egomania--is extremely appealing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Willa Paskin
    Russian Doll is a two-hander, and when it gets to that portion of the series--around Episode 4--the whole thing elevates even further, both emotionally and logistically. Russian Doll is a tightly plotted, high-concept puzzle-TV comedy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    The new season has some of this same incomprehensibility [of season 1 and 2], but a relatively small amount. Everything about it is toned down. The creepy totems left at the scene of the crime seem like a willful echo of the first season’s tangles of twigs, but without their eerie power. Ali is excellent as Hays.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Willa Paskin
    An extremely effective piece of entertainment journalism--though it may be more accurate to think of it as an extremely effective piece of activist entertainment journalism. The series is comprehensively damning and powerfully disturbing--while also being riveting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Willa Paskin
    Beach House is a bag of Pop Rocks that don’t fizz, a firework that sputters into nothing much. ... Perhaps the cast will come to seem interesting after a few episodes, but if any of them were switched out after the premiere, I wouldn’t notice. Lohan and her business partner Panos Spentzos—who with his matching yellow hat and caftan, outsize ego, and acid asides has a much cannier grasp on how to be a reality star than anyone else assembled.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    I found her [Florence Pugh as Charlie] extremely appealing and am looking forward to seeing her in whatever she does next (including Greta Gerwig’s adaptation of Little Women), even though her spirited sanity undermines the tension around her character’s psychological torment. Pugh is helped in all of this by the script.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    [My Brilliant Friend] is slavishly faithful to the source material. If this doesn’t make it a particularly inspired or creative adaptation, it does at least restore the books to themselves rather than their talking points.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    Wright’s reserve, unlike Spacey’s bombast, helps keep some of the writing’s mania in check. ... The self-serious drama hasn’t just morphed into a Ryan Murphy fantasy sequence; it appears to have thought more holistically about what promoting women should actually look like. ... Generally speaking, the show feels knowingly ludicrous, so in on its own jokes that it can occasionally transcend them.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    Homecoming doesn’t feel all that bleak. With its lean storytelling, contained plot, and focus on characters as opposed to power structures, it makes chaos feel manageable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    Despite the timeliness of this dialogue, Charmed plays like a throwback to the schlocky original, which aired in the 1990s and to which it is surprisingly faithful in spirit. ... Charmed is more supernatural procedural than serial drama.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    It’s trying to be the moody, teen-tastic interpretation of it. As Sabrina keeps using dark magic in situations she probably should not, Shipka’s bright professionalism wards off any real tension.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    The show works fine without her [Roseanne]. ... The Conners still wants to be a sitcom for both Democrats and Republicans, but instead of making hay of culture war flashpoints, it stays focused on the Conners’ bleakly circumscribed reality--and the foreshortening of opportunity that applies to the have-nots of both political tribes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    What there’s not is Dunham, the volatile agent whose larger-than-fiction persona makes the experiment so singular. Without her, the results are standard: another perfectly serviceable series about awful people, but not a special one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    Three extremely uneven installments (all that were made available for review). ... The first, the very bad “The Violet Hour,” reveals itself to be a toothless and deeply unappealing romantic comedy. ... The second episode, the decent-by-comparison “The Royal We.” ... That third episode--the only one made available to me that I would describe as “good.”
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Willa Paskin
    Murphy Brown’s political chatter has been reduced to a lot of Trump jokes. The reboot is much more interested in the current state of the media. The first three episodes are unsatisfying sitcom disquisitions on Conundrums in Contemporary Media Coverage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    For better and worse, it’s like a psychedelic Hallmark card: gorgeous, clever, weird, but maybe you’ve heard the sentiment before.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Willa Paskin
    Despite Rudolph and Armisen’s tremendous comic talents, their characters aren’t even particularly funny. Indeed, there’s something false about Oscar and June’s dynamic, the love story at the very center of the show. They fill hours debating questions like, What’s the all-time best way to sit? It’s supposed to be cute, a kind of laborious in-joke, but it’s mannered, like the behavior of people in a new, fragile relationship.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Willa Paskin
    The First is a glossy, often-inert tale of devotion and spaceflight. Its first two episodes treat inevitabilities as questions, and unfold with the zip of a DVR-ed sporting event for which you already read the box score. ... But The First does get better after its first two episodes (before getting worse again) by jettisoning inevitability. ... As flawed as I found the first season, I’ll admit, it hooked me enough that I’m interested to see how they live life on Mars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Willa Paskin
    Through the first two episodes, Kidding has the slightly whimsical but basically naturalistic vibe of an indie family drama. ... When the series turns to Sebastian, a cold and implausible father, and his plotting, it feels as though Kidding is not quite confident that its two elegiac central questions--how to be sad and how to be good--are interesting enough. If the show could make itself comfortable with Mr. Pickles’ gloom, they could be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    In Poehler and Offerman, Making It has the funniest and most accomplished hosts a competition show could ask for, and it makes the most of them.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    Like all of Baron Cohen’s work, Who Is America? has skirmishes with bro humor and punching down, but in sequences like the one mentioned above [Kinderguardians and as Nira Cain-N'Degeocello]--in which conservatives state the abhorrent things they truly believe because they think it’s safe--it justifies all of its inconsistency.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Willa Paskin
    Sharp Objects is a horror story of matrilineal dysfunction, a feminist series that reminds us that women can do anything, and it represents a new benchmark for series by and about women—that they too, can make pure, grim prestige television. ... Sharp Objects also seems to me to be utterly burdened by the clichés of prestige TV--if very likely to reap all of that format’s awards.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Willa Paskin
    Their in-ring roles reduce complicated women to simplified cartoons. In this way the wrestling personas are the exact opposite of the roles on Netflix’s GLOW, which are the kind of rich, meaty, more-than-just-likeable parts that actresses always wish they could find.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 Willa Paskin
    Invigoratingly dumb new dating show. ... It has no ambiance, no emotional connections. It has a premise, not promises. And it has no dramatic throughline. The Proposal trying to manufacture romance is like a chef trying to make a meal out of half a Rice Krispies Treat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Willa Paskin
    Very watchable but totally missable: not urgent, not escapist, and not even the best premium cable show about hugely entertaining rich people. ... But the show is not quite scathing or indicting enough to bring a sense of urgency to its study of the super-rich.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Willa Paskin
    Certain details suggest the show’s underlying analysis might be lacking--is the beauty industrial complex really more complicit in perpetuating rape culture and disempowering women than, say, misogyny and sexism? But watching the show toss a million balls in the air is riveting, even if I have no particular expectation it won’t ultimately drop most of them.

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