Metascore
81

Generally favorable reviews - based on 23 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 23
  2. Negative: 0 out of 23
Buy On
  1. Sep 6, 2012
    70
    Although expansive, sometimes beautiful, and occasionally fun, Darksiders II is mediocre at best, a rambling bore of a game and a shoddy sequel. You may have liked the original, and you may enjoy action RPGs, but you've played this game before, and not just once.
  2. Aug 24, 2012
    60
    I can say, though, that Darksiders 2 plays really, really well on a decent PC, so what it lacks in fidelity it at least partially makes up for in smooth framerates.
User Score
7.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 782 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 65 out of 782
  1. Aug 20, 2012
    9
    Yes I have it for PC, yes you can tell its a port. No there are no graphic options. Does it look good? Does it play good? Hell yes it does.Yes I have it for PC, yes you can tell its a port. No there are no graphic options. Does it look good? Does it play good? Hell yes it does. Force V sync through you card, Force the AA, and shut up. There can always be patch down the road to add these features. It does not break the great game these guys made. Tons of content, great voice acting, killer gameplay. You would have to be a fool to not realize that PC gamers are not the main revenue for developers, deal with it. Consoles took over years ago. That doesn't mean we should be neglected, but it also doesn't help to cry about it and miss out on a great game like this and pretend your 0 metacritic score is enough to matter. 0 really? Grow up. You are probably playing it right now with a **** eating grin on your face. I'm 31 and have played more games than I want to admit, this is a great one. Pick it up, you won't regret it. Full Review »
  2. Aug 16, 2012
    8
    A terrible PC port, but Amazing game. Gorgeous characters and world design, great voice work and a real old school dungeon crawler feel withA terrible PC port, but Amazing game. Gorgeous characters and world design, great voice work and a real old school dungeon crawler feel with all the modern day bits from classic's like Zelda, Prince of Persia and Devil May Cry all thrown into the mix. You can quite readily approach the game at your own pace. Choosing to go off and pilfer and loot forgotten chests to your hearts content or follow the quest line and learn new abilities as you level up, earn ever improving weapons and armor and progress through this great tie in of a story to it's predecessor. Outside of the main game you have the new Arena mode which allows you to fight against wave after wave of enemies for increasingly better loot , be warned however, if you die you lose everything. This can really force you to up your game and gives the Arena a great sense of urgency, making each battle increasingly tense. The feeling when you know you've earned a great reward and chosen to risk it all for the taste of something even sweeter is invigorating and how a game should be enjoyed. The combat indecently is very satisfying and pacey. Gone is the brute force and strength of War and in it's place a new sleeker combat system. If I were to liken it to something, then it would be a 'Devil May Cry light' style of combat. You have your standard enemy grapple and main dual wielded weapons, intended for quick combos, pummeling your enemy before you dodge out of range again. Death is a lean combatant, he cannot parry or block enemy strikes so dodging will become your friend here. You also wield a heavier and incidentally slower secondary weapon which deals greater damage and can break through some tougher enemies defenses that Death's scythes cannot. A ranged pistol will soon become your ever present companion also, good for quick bursts of ranged damage. The pistol is less of a focus in Death's combat in comparison to his other weapons, the pistol being more integral to the games vast puzzles, which you frequently encounter along Deaths journey through conveniently parkour friendly architecture. Death will encounter environmental blockages he must traverse with an assortment of talents, from wall running, to climbing, to a ghostly grapple; swinging from point to point. All sprinkled with certain environmental items and golem helpers . Death can also often be found blowing holes in wall after wall with a toss of a bomb and a quick shot from the hip of your pistol, opening a new passage. Puzzles will reveal areas unreachable through standard adventuring and will reap the player rewards such as hulking chest which Death rips open in a triumphant smash of nether world magic to poor more loot into you hulking inventory or the ever elusive quest keys, which can be found throughout dungeons or as rewards from defeating the games many bosses. A boss battle in Darksiders II joins a rank of so few, that only games of the caliber of Shadow of the Colossus and Dark Souls can hope to rub shoulders with what's been accomplished in this game. Gone are the quick time events of old and anew we find a game where each Boss encountered is as gleeful and exhilarating to the player to enjoy as it clearly was for the creators to craft. Enemies will employ varyied tactics hoping to stop Death in his quest to reap them. Each encounter is compelling, often lasting several minutes and challenges the player to adapt, track the enemies patterns and discern how best to tackle these determined and monstrous opponents. These bosses may be the highlight of the game, but as Death you find yourself in a world so vast you will need to travel great distances to reach these encounters. Compared to the original, the game world and the playground Death now inhabits has grown in spades. Totaling 3 times it's predecessor. The environments are richly varied and detailed, the occasional muddy textures will be forgiven in the wake of such a masterfully crafted world. Death will not be alone on his journey. He can summon his trusty stead outside of cities and traverse the games many environments in a flash. The game offers a quick travel system also, making some task far less trivial and hastening you towards your next encounter. Many players may want to take the extra time to travel the land my horse back however. The music is exquisite and finds that balance so few games can find in allowing the music dip seamlessly into the background as you feel it express your adventure, your trials emote the world, it's environments. Death's journey through the game brings many joys to the player. The game seems to scream at the top of it's lungs it's unashamed to borrow from it's peers whole hardheartedly and concoct a new formula, blending the old with the new. When Death's adventure comes to a close, you will have learned many facts and stories about the world you inhabit. However, this game demands to be played again, going so far as to offering a Game+ mode for those who have completed it Full Review »
  3. Aug 15, 2012
    3
    I thoroughly enjoyed the first title, and I was looking forward to this sequel all year. The game itself is great. It even outshines the firstI thoroughly enjoyed the first title, and I was looking forward to this sequel all year. The game itself is great. It even outshines the first in many areas. Unfortunately, I cannot recommend enough to STAY AWAY from the PC version if you can. It's a 100% console port. And that means control issues, stability issues, and no graphics options whatsoever.

    I'd be giving this game a 9 IF IT WEREN'T FOR THE FACT that at a certain point, I crashed to desktop which bugged out my game, preventing me from continuing the main quest line 13 hours in. This particular crash also happened to others, not just me. THQ, a game that breaks half way is a game not worth playing at all.

    I am extremely disappointed that such game breaking bugs exist, given that THQ's excuse for the delay of the game's release was to 'polish it up'.

    I want to love this game, I really do. But it doesn't look like I'll get to see the last half of the game unless I start from scratch, and I sure as hell ain't doing that.
    Full Review »